Too many businesses falling short on green issues

Thursday 13 December 2012

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Too many UK businesses are merely paying lip service to green issues, it has been claimed.

According to Justin Vroone, commercial director at energy management provider IMServ Europe, companies are failing to implement the necessary behavioural changes needed to make a real difference to energy reduction.

He said that while many companies are developing energy strategies, often as part of their corporate social responsibility, they do not know where to start when it comes to analysing energy usage and introducing behavioural changes.

"Generally, there is board-level enthusiasm for energy saving strategies and often a clear business benefit for embracing energy efficiencies," Mr Vroone stated.

"But organisations are struggling to put into practice a measurable energy saving programme."

He said that in many cases, the biggest challenge is implementing a shift in employee attitude and behaviour.

Staff may be happy to turn off lights at home, but this is not always the case in the workplace, Mr Vroone noted.

"Many organisations address these obstacles by introducing a combination of persuasive and incentivised measures to get everyone on board," he said.

The expert claimed the first priority for any organisation is to monitor current energy consumption by obtaining accurate data for electricity, gas, water, and heat usage, as well as information on carbon emissions and temperature.

Once this information has been obtained, businesses need to analyse it to gain valuable energy intelligence, Mr Vroone said.

"This intelligence can then be used to communicate to and persuade the company and employees to make the necessary behavioural changes," he noted.

The government believes demand for power will rise by 30 per cent to 100 per cent by 2050.

By this time - in accordance with undertakings already given - the UK will need to have reduced its greenhouse gas emissions by 80 per cent.

Reducing electricity demand could not only enable individual businesses to keep their energy expenditure under control, but save the economy £4 billion per year by 2030.

Posted by Dan Smith