Looking for savings with an open source-only approach? Consider this first…

07 August 2012 | Michele Bedford Thistle, Business Manager, Government, National Security, and International Organizations, Worldwide Public Sector

Over the past decade, many government organizations have turned to open source technologies in an effort to cut costs, improve citizen services, and drive innovation. However, many organizations have found that an open source-only approach to achieving these goals has not fully delivered on expectations.

At Microsoft, we’ve made a big commitment to embracing openness and interoperability. From this work, we’ve been able to offer our government customers solutions that can augment current open source deployments, or even replace them, with greater savings and better outcomes than previously attained through an open-source only approach. It’s an initiative that’s received a lot of interest in recent years.

Take, for example, the Government of Albania, which hosts key applications in a private cloud environment based on Microsoft technologies. As a result, productivity increased 70 percent and government users experienced faster, more reliable services.

To learn more about Microsoft’s work in the open source space, check out my colleague James Utzschneider’s post to Microsoft’s Openness blog (@openatmicrosoft). There, he has many other examples of customers that have benefitted by moving beyond an open source-only technology strategy.

Have a comment or opinion on this post? Let me know @Microsoft_Gov. Have a question for the author? Please e-mail us at ongovernment@microsoft.com.

Michele Bedford Thistle
Business Manager, Government, National Security, and International Organizations, Worldwide Public Sector

About the Author

Michele Bedford Thistle | Business Manager, Government, National Security, and International Organizations, Worldwide Public Sector

Michele is focused on sharing stories from government customers creating real impact for citizens, employees, economies, and students. She joined the worldwide team from Microsoft Canada, where she was also marketing lead for several technology start-ups.