Exam 70-564:

Pro: Designing and Developing ASP.NET Applications Using the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5

Published:January 29, 2009
Language(s):English
Audience(s):Developers
Technology:Microsoft Visual Studio 2008
Type:Proctored Exam

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Preparing for an Exam
This exam is scheduled to retire July 31, 2013.
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We recommend that you review this preparation guide in its entirety and familiarize yourself with the FAQs and resources on the Microsoft Certification website before you schedule your exam.
Audience Profile
Questions that contain code will be presented in either VB or C#. Candidates can select one of these languages when they start the exam.
 
Candidates for this exam work on a team in a development environment that uses Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2008 and the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 to build ASP.NET applications. Candidates should have a minimum of three years of experience developing Web-based applications including one to two years of experience developing ASP.NET-based applications and a thorough understanding of the ASP.NET technologies in the .NET Framework 3.5.
Additionally, candidates should be able to demonstrate the following by using the .NET Framework 3.5:
A solid understanding of the ASP.NET applications event model
Experience creating ASP.NET applications that access data
Experience planning and designing user interaction solutions
Experience in the full cycle of software applications
Credit Toward CertificationExam 70-564: Pro: Designing and Developing ASP.NET Applications Using the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5: counts as credit toward the following certification(s):
  • Microsoft Certified Professional Developer (MCPD): ASP.NET Developer 3.5
Note This preparation guide is subject to change at any time without prior notice and at the sole discretion of Microsoft. Microsoft exams might include adaptive testing technology and simulation items. Microsoft does not identify the format in which exams are presented. Please use this preparation guide to prepare for the exam, regardless of its format.
Skills Being MeasuredThis exam measures your ability to accomplish the technical tasks listed below.The percentages indicate the relative weight of each major topic area on the exam.The higher the percentage, the more questions you are likely to see on that content area on the exam.

The information after “This objective may include but is not limited to” is intended to further define or scope the objective by describing the types of skills and topics that may be tested for the objective. However, it is not an exhaustive list of skills and topics that could be included on the exam for a given skill area. You may be tested on other skills and topics related to the objective that are not explicitly listed here.
Designing and Implementing Controls (13 percent)
  • Choose appropriate controls based on business requirements.

    May include but is not limited to: user controls, server controls, built-in controls, custom controls, third-party controls, Web parts
  • Design controls for reusability.

    May include but is not limited to: user controls, server controls, inheritance for changing behavior
  • Manage states for controls.

    May include but is not limited to: control state, view state, accessing form elements
  • Leverage data-bound controls.

    May include but is not limited to: use gridviews, use sorting and paging callbacks when available, when to use custom sorting and paging, server-side pagination
  • Choose appropriate validation controls based on business requirements.

    May include but is not limited to: server-side page validation (Page.IsValid), custom validator, validation groups, validation summary
  • Identify the appropriate usage of ASP.NET AJAX.

    May include but is not limited to: implementing partial page updates with update panel, using ASP.NET AJAX controls, script services
  • Manage JavaScript dependencies with server controls.
Designing the Presentation and Layout of an Application (16 percent)
  • Design complex layout with Master Pages.

    May include but is not limited to: strongly typed master pages, nested master pages
  • Plan for various user agents.

    May include but is not limited to: markups for different browsers for mobile devices, screen readers, accessibility
  • Design a brandable user interface by using themes.

    May include but is not limited to: shared themes across multiple applications, run time master page selection
  • Design site navigation.

    May include but is not limited to: when to extend site map provider, treeview menu vs. site map path, programmatically manipulating site map nodes, overriding menu rendering by using control adapters, filtering site map nodes based on user roles
  • Plan Web sites to support globalization.

    May include but is not limited to: custom resource provider vs. resource files, localize applications
Accessing Data and Services (18 percent)
  • Plan vendor-independent database interactions.

    May include but is not limited to: IDBconnection, IDBcommand, IDBadapter, IdataReader, Datareader vs. dataset
  • Identify the appropriate usage of data source controls.

    May include but is not limited to: SQLDataSource, ObjectDataSource, XMLDataSource
  • Leverage LINQ in data access design.

    May include but is not limited to: LINQtoSQL, lambda expressions, LINQtoObjects, LINQtoXML
  • Identify opportunities to access and expose Web services.

    May include but is not limited to: WCF, ASMX, REST
Establishing ASP.NET Solution Structure (13 percent)
  • Determine when to use the Web Site model vs. a Web Application Project.

    May include but is not limited to: project file, references, namespace, user profile object, precompilation
  • Establish an error-handling strategy.

    May include but is not limited to: Global.asax events, Web.config elements, TRY/CATCH blocks, error logging
  • Manipulate configuration files to change ASP.NET behavior.

    May include but is not limited to: machine key, tracing, encrypting Web configuration data, custom configuration sections
  • Identify a deployment strategy.

    May include but is not limited to: mangement application pools, Web deployment projects, pre-compilation, custom action classes
Leveraging and Extending ASP.NET Architecture (17 percent)
  • Design a state management strategy.

    May include but is not limited to: Cache, ViewState, Application object, Session object, cookies, cookieless session
  • Identify the events of the page life cycle.

    May include but is not limited to: appending controls, PostBack model, accessing state, data binding
  • Write HttpModules and HttpHandlers.

    May include but is not limited to: URL rewriting, SSO application, dynamically retrieve data
  • Debug ASP.NET Web applications.

    May include but is not limited to: debug JavaScript, tracing, debug tools in IDE, examining HTTP headers
  • Plan for long-running processes by using asynchronous pages.

    May include but is not limited to: AddonPreRenderCompleteAsync, RegisterAsyncTask
Applying security principles (23 percent)
  • Identify appropriate security providers.

    May include but is not limited to: membership, role, profile, extending custom providers
  • Decide which user-related information to store in a profile.

    May include but is not limited to: create user profile properties, extend membership objects, custom types
  • Establish security settings in Web.config.

    May include but is not limited to: identity/impersonation, authentication, authorization (location nodes in Web.config)
  • Identify vulnerable elements in applications.

    May include but is not limited to: SQL injection, cross-site scripting, protecting against bots
  • Ensure that sensitive information in applications is protected.

    May include but is not limited to: hash and salt passwords, encrypting information
Preparation Tools and ResourcesTo help you prepare for this exam, Microsoft Learning recommends that you have hands-on experience with the product and that you use the following training resources. These training resources do not necessarily cover all of the topics listed in the "Skills Measured" tab.
Learning Plans and Classroom Training
Microsoft E-Learning There is no Microsoft E-Learning training currently available.
Microsoft Press Books There are no Microsoft Press books currently available.
Practice Tests
Microsoft Online Resources
  • Microsoft Learning Community: Join newsgroups and visit community forums to connect with your peers for suggestions on training resources and advice on your certification path and studies.
  • TechNet: Designed for IT professionals, this site includes how-to instructions, best practices, downloads, technical resources, newsgroups, and chats.
  • MSDN: Designed for developers, the Microsoft Developer Network (MSDN) features code samples, technical articles, downloads, newsgroups, and chats.
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