October 1999

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Setting User Rights

In Windows 2000 you can turn on the Lock Pages in Memory user right by performing the following steps:
Open the Computer Management snap-in by right-clicking on the My Computer desktop icon and selecting Manage from the context menu.
If the Console menu is not visible, click the application icon on the title bar and select User Options from the menu. Select the "Always Open Console Files in Author Mode" checkbox, then click on the OK button and close the application. Restart the application.
If the Local Computer Policy item is not visible in the left-hand pane, select Add/Remove Snap-in from the Console menu. On the Standalone tab, select Computer Management (Local) from the Snap-ins Added To combobox. Now click on the Add button to display the Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box.
Select Group Policy from the Available Standalone Snap-ins list, and click on the Add button. On the Select Group Policy Object dialog box, leave the defaults as is and click on the Finish button. Click on the Close button in the Add Standalone Snap-in dialog box, and click on the OK button in the Add/Remove Snap-in dialog box. At this point, the Local Computer Policy item should be visible in the left-hand pane of the Computer Management console.
In the left-hand pane of the console, double-click to expand each of the following items: Local Computer Policy, Computer Configuration, Windows Settings, Security Settings, and Local Policies. Select the User Rights Assignment item. In the right-hand pane, select the Lock Pages in Memory attribute.
Select Security from the Action menu to display the Lock Pages in Memory dialog box. Click on the Add button. Use the Select Users or Groups dialog box to add the users or groups to whom you want to assign the Lock Pages in Memory user right. Exit each of the dialog boxes by clicking on the OK button.
User rights are granted when a user logs on. If you just granted the Lock Pages in Memory right to yourself, you must log off and log back on before it takes effect.

From the October 1999 issue of Microsoft Systems Journal. Get it at your local newsstand, or better yet, subscribe.

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