Training
Certifications
Books
Special Offers
Community




 
Microsoft® SQL Server™ 2000 Administrator's Companion
Author Marci Frohock Garcia, Jamie Reding, Edward Whalen, Steve Adrien DeLuca
Pages 1168
Disk 1 Companion CD(s)
Level All Levels
Published 09/27/2000
ISBN 9780735610514
ISBN-10 0-7356-1051-7
Price(USD) $59.99
To see this book's discounted price, select a reseller below.
 

More Information

About the Book
Table of Contents
Sample Chapter
Index
Related Series
Related Books
About the Author

Support: Book & CD

Rate this book
Barnes Noble Amazon Quantum Books

 

Table of Contents


Acknowledgmentsxxv
Introductionxxvii
PART I  INTRODUCTION TO MICROSOFT SQL SERVER 
1   Overview of Microsoft SQL Server 2
    SQL Server Systems 3
    New Features and Enhancements of SQL Server 2000 6
    Summary 13
2   The Microsoft Windows 2000 Platform 14
    The Windows 2000 Family 15
        Windows 2000 Professional 15
        Windows 2000 Server 16
        Windows 2000 Advanced Server 16
        Windows 2000 Datacenter Server 16
        Windows 2000 Operating System Family Differences 17
    Windows 2000 Components and Features 17
        Reliability 17
        Security 19
        Ease of Use 20
        System Administration and Deployment 22
        The Mobile Experience 26
        Performance 27
        Internet Access 29
        Active Directory 30
    Summary 33
3   Roles and Responsibilities of the Microsoft SQL Server DBA34
    Basic and Optional Duties of the SQL Server DBA 35
        Installation and Configuration 36
        Security 37
        Operations 38
        Service Levels 39
        System Uptime 40
        Documentation 42
        Design and Development 45
        Miscellaneous 47
    DBA Tips and Techniques 48
        Dealing with the User Community 48
        System Tuning 49
        Dealing with a Crisis 50
    Summary 51
PART II  INSTALLATION AND SETUP 
4   Designing a Microsoft SQL Server System54
    System Requirements 55
        System Application 56
        Service Level Requirements 58
    System Components and Options 59
        Windows 2000 Versions 59
        SQL Server Versions 61
        Version Comparison 62
        System Options 62
    Database Layout 64
        Transaction Log 64
        Data Files 65
    Application 65
        Architecture 66
        Performance and Scalability 68
    Summary 68
5   I/O Subsystem Configuration and Planning70
    Disk Drive Performance Characteristics 71
        Disk Drive Construction 72
        Disk Drive Characteristics 73
        Disk Drive Specifications 75
        Disk Drive Performance 76
        Solutions to the Disk Performance Limitation Problem 78
    RAID Overview 78
    I/O Subsystem Concepts 79
        Caching Controllers 79
        Disk Drive Caches 80
        Internal vs. External RAID 80
        Storage Area Networks 81
        Controller and Bus Bandwidth Issues 82
        High-End I/O Subsystems 82
        Elevator Sorting 82
        Disk Reliability 84
    Overview of Common RAID Levels 84
        RAID 0 85
        RAID 1 86
        RAID 5 88
        RAID 10 91
    RAID Level Performance Comparison 92
        Read Performance 92
        Write Performance 93
        Disk Calculations 94
        RAID Comparison 95
    I/O Latencies and SQL Server 96
    Planning the SQL Server Disk Layout 97
        Determine I/O Requirements 97
        Plan the Disk Layout 99
        Implement the Configuration 100
    I/O Subsystem Tips and Recommendations 102
    Summary 103
6   Capacity Planning104
    Types of Capacity Planning 105
    History of Capacity Planning 107
    Transaction Processing 109
        OLTP Transactions 109
        DSS Transactions 110
    Principles of Capacity Planning 111
        CPU Utilization 112
        Page Faulting 116
    Capacity Planning for Memory 118
        Collecting Memory Usage Data 120
        Analyzing Memory Data 121
    Capacity Planning for the Processor 123
        Fault Tolerance 124
        Collecting Usage Data for a Single CPU 129
        Collecting Usage Data for Multiple CPUs 130
    Capacity Planning for the Disk Subsystem 131
        Disk Drives for Windows 2000 and SQL Server 132
        Disk Drives for the Log Files 133
        Disk Drives for the Database 134
        Disk Drives Needed for the System 136
        Collecting Disk Usage Data 136
        Analyzing Disk Usage Data 137
    Capacity Planning for the Network 138
        Collecting Network Usage Data 139
        Analyzing Network Usage Data 139
    Choosing the Data to Collect 140
        Collecting Process Data 140
        Analyzing Process Data 141
    Summary 143
7   Installing Microsoft SQL Server 144
    Server Installation 145
    Upgrading from Earlier Versions 153
    Client Installation 161
    Summary 161
8   Managing Microsoft SQL Server Services162
    SQL Server Services 163
    Using SQL Server Service Manager 165
    Using Windows 2000 Service Control Manager 166
    Using SQL Server Enterprise Manager 168
        Managing SQL Server 168
        Managing Other Services 175
    Summary 177
9   Creating Databases178
    Database Structure 179
        Files 179
        Filegroups 180
        Rules and Recommendations 184
        Automatic File Growth 185
    System Databases 186
    Database Creation 187
        Using the Create Database Wizard 188
        Using Enterprise Manager 193
        Using T-SQL Commands 195
    Database Viewing 198
        Using Enterprise Manager 198
        Using SQL 200
    Database Deletion 200
        Using Enterprise Manager 200
        Using SQL 201
    Summary 202
10   Creating Database Tables204
    Laying the Groundwork 205
    Reviewing Table Basics 206
        Defining a Database Table 206
        Using System Data Types 207
        Working with User-Defined Data Types 212
    Creating Tables in a Filegroup 218
        Creating the Product_Info Table in a Filegroup 219
    Using Null Values 220
        Creating the Product_Info Table Using NULLs 221
    Adding the IDENTITY Property to the Product_Info Table222
    Creating a Table Using Enterprise Manager 223
    Summary 227
11   Microsoft SQL Server on the Network228
    Overview of Network Services 229
    SQL Server APIs 231
        DB-LIB Connectivity 232
        ODBC Connectivity 232
        ODBC Connection Pooling 232
        Other APIs 233
    Network Libraries 233
        The SQL Server 2000 Server Network Utility 234
        The SQL Server 2000 Client Network Utility 235
        SQL Server Net-Libraries and Protocols 239
    Network Components and SQL Server Performance 240
        The Software Layer—Network Protocols 241
        The Hardware Layer 242
    Network Monitoring 244
        Monitoring Performance 244
        Determining Whether You Have a Problem 245
        Finding Solutions to Network Problems 246
    Summary 247
12   Microsoft SQL Server and Microsoft Cluster Services248
    Types of Failure 249
    Overview of MSCS 250
        Basic Concepts 252
        Cluster Components 253
        Cluster Application Types 260
        MSCS Modes 260
    Examples of Clustered Systems 263
        Example 1—High-Availability System with Static Load Balancing 263
        Example 2—Hot Spare System with Maximum Availability264
        Example 3—Partial Server Cluster265
        Example 4—Virtual Server Only, with No Failover266
    SQL Server Cluster Configuration 266
        Planning Your Configuration 267
        Installing SQL Server for Clustering 268
        Using a Three-Tier Application 273
    Beyond MSCS 273
    Summary 274
PART III  USING MICROSOFT SQL SERVER 
13   Introduction to Transact-SQL and SQL Query Analyzer276
    What Is SQL? 277
        DDL 278
        DML 279
    What Is T-SQL? 281
    A Review of New T-SQL Features 281
        System Stored Procedures 281
        System Tables 282
        Functions 283
        Data Types 284
        Statements 285
    How to Use T-SQL 285
        The ISQL Utility 285
        The OSQL Utility 286
        The Query Analyzer 287
        T-SQL Scripting 289
    Summary 291
14   Retrieving Data Using Transact-SQL292
    The SELECT Statement 293
        The SELECT Clause 294
        The FROM Clause 298
        The INTO Clause 304
        The WHERE Clause and Search Conditions 305
        The GROUP BY Clause 317
        The HAVING Clause 320
        The ORDER BY Clause 322
        The UNION Operator 325
    T-SQL Functions 329
        Aggregate Functions 330
    Other Uses for SELECT 332
    Summary 333
15   Managing Tables Using T-SQL and Enterprise Manager334
    Modifying a Table Using T-SQL 337
        Altering Columns 337
        Adding Columns 340
        Dropping Columns 342
        Renaming Columns 342
    Modifying a Table Using Enterprise Manager 343
        Altering Columns 344
        Adding Columns 347
        Dropping Columns 347
        Creating and Using a Database Diagram 348
    The Effects of Altering a Table 351
    Dropping a Table 352
        Using T-SQL to Drop a Table 352
        Using Enterprise Manager to Drop a Table 353
    Summary 355
16   Creating and Using Defaults, Constraints, and Rules356
    Defaults 357
        Defining and Modifying Defaults by Using T-SQL 358
        Defining and Modifying Defaults
by Using Enterprise Manager
364
    Constraints 370
        Creating and Modifying Constraints by Using T-SQL 370
        Creating and Modifying Constraints by Using Enterprise Manager 381
    Rule Objects 394
        Creating a Rule Object by Using T-SQL 395
        Creating a Rule Object by Using Enterprise Manager 395
    Summary 397
17   Creating and Using Indexes398
    What Is an Index? 399
    Indexing Concepts 402
        Index Keys 402
        Index Uniqueness 405
        Types of Indexes 406
    Creating Indexes 409
        Using the Create Index Wizard 409
        Using Transact-SQL 415
        Using Fill Factor to Avoid Page Splits 416
        Using the Full-Text Indexing Wizard 418
        Creating Full-Text Indexes by Using Stored Procedures 422
        Using the Full-Text Index 423
    Rebuilding Indexes 424
        Updating Index Statistics 425
    Using Indexes 426
        Using Hints 427
        Using Query Analyzer 428
    Designing Effective Indexes 430
        Characteristics of an Effective Index 430
        When to Use Indexes 431
        Index Guidelines 432
    Summary 432
18   Creating and Using Views 434
    What Is a View? 435
    View Concepts 436
        Types of Views 436
        Advantages of Views 436
        View Restrictions 437
    Creating Views 437
        Using T-SQL to Create a View 437
        Using Enterprise Manager to Create a View 446
        Using the Create View Wizard to Create a View 449
        Tips for Views 452
    Altering and Dropping Views 453
        Using Enterprise Manager to Alter and Drop Views 453
        Using T-SQL to Alter and Drop Views 456
    View Enhancements in SQL Server 2000 457
        Updatable, Distributed Partitioned Views 457
        Indexed Views 464
    Summary 465


Next




Top of Page


Last Updated: Saturday, July 7, 2001