To create a mounted drive

Using the Windows interface

1.

Open Computer Management (Local) 

2.

In the console tree, click Disk Management.

Where?

Computer Management (Local) > Storage > Disk Management

3.

Right-click the partition or volume you want to mount, and then click Change Drive Letter and Paths.

4.

Do one of the following:

To mount a volume, click Add. Click Mount in the following empty NTFS folder, type the path to an empty folder on an NTFS volume, or click Browse to locate it.

To unmount a volume, click it and then click Remove.

Note

To open Computer Management, click Start, and then click Control Panel. Click Performance and Maintenance, click Administrative Tools, and then double-click Computer Management

You must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group in order to complete this procedure. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may also prevent you from completing this procedure. 

When you mount a local drive at an empty folder on an NTFS volume, Disk Management assigns a drive path to the drive rather than a drive letter. Drive paths are available only on empty folders on basic or dynamic NTFS volumes.

If you are administering a local or remote computer, you can browse NTFS folders on that computer.

When using server clusters, make sure that you create unique mounted drives so that they do not conflict with existing local drives on any node in the cluster 

When using server clusters, do not create mounted drives between disks on the cluster storage device (cluster disks) and local disks.

When using server clusters, do not create mounted drives from the cluster disk that contains the quorum resource (the quorum disk). You can, however, create a mounted drive from the quorum disk to a clustered disk.

When using server clusters, mounted drives from one cluster disk to another must be in the same cluster resource group, and must be dependent on the root disk.

For more information on server clusters, see Server clusters overview

When creating mounted drives, use Event Viewer to check the system log for any Cluster service errors or warnings indicating mount point failures. These errors would be listed as ClusSvc in the Source column.

For more information on how to use Event Viewer to check the system log, see Related Topics.

For more information on how to resolve errors with mounted drives on server clusters, see Server clusters overview

Using a command line

1.

Open Command Prompt

2.

From the NTFS drive\folder that you want to mount elsewhere, type:

diskpart.

3.

At the DISKPART prompt, type:

list volume

Make note of the number of the simple volume that you want to mount elsewhere.

4.

At the DISKPART prompt, type:

select volume n

Select the simple volume, n, that you want to mount elsewhere.

5.

At the DISKPART prompt, type:

assign [mount=path]

ValueDescription

list volume

Displays a list of basic and dynamic volumes on all disks.

select volume

Selects the specified volume, where n is the volume number, and shifts the focus to it. If no volume is specified, the select command lists the current volume with focus. You can specify the volume by number, drive letter, or mount point path. On a basic disk, selecting a volume also gives the corresponding partition focus.

assign

Assigns a drive letter or mount point to the volume with focus. If no drive letter or mount point is specified, then the next available drive letter is assigned. If the drive letter or mount point is already in use, an error is generated.

Using the assign command, you can change the drive letter associated with a removable drive.

You cannot assign drive letters to system volumes, boot volumes, or volumes that contain the paging file. In addition, you cannot assign a drive letter to an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) partition or any GPT partition other than a basic MSDATA partition.

mount=path

Specifies an empty, existing NTFS folder where the mounted drive will reside.

Note

Related Topics

View more details about an event

Event Viewer overview

Using Event Viewer

Mountvol

DiskPart

Using NTFS mounted drives

Assign, change, or remove a drive letter

To open command prompt, click Start, point to All Programs, point to Accessories, and then click Command Prompt

You must be logged on as an administrator or a member of the Administrators group in order to complete this procedure. If your computer is connected to a network, network policy settings may also prevent you from completing this procedure. 

Drive paths are available only on empty folders on basic or dynamic NTFS volumes.

To modify a drive path, remove it and then create a new drive path using the new location. You cannot modify the drive path directly.

When using server clusters, make sure that you create unique mounted drives so that they do not conflict with existing local drives on any node in the cluster 

When using server clusters, do not create mounted drives between disks on the cluster storage device (cluster disks) and local disks.

When using server clusters, do not create mounted drives from the cluster disk that contains the quorum resource (the quorum disk). You can, however, create a mounted drive from the quorum disk to a clustered disk.

When using server clusters, mounted drives from one cluster disk to another must be in the same cluster resource group, and must be dependent on the root disk.

For more information on server clusters, see Server clusters overview

When creating mounted drives, use Event Viewer to check the system log for any Cluster service errors or warnings indicating mount point failures. These errors would be listed as ClusSvc in the Source column.

For more information on how to use Event Viewer to check the system log, see Related Topics.

For more information on how to resolve errors with mounted drives on server clusters, see Server clusters overview

For more information about DiskPart, see Related Topics.

You can also create a mounted drive using the mountvol command. For more information about mountvol, see Related Topics.



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