To configure an incoming connection to use TCP/IP

1.

Open Network Connections

2.

Click Incoming Connections, and then, under Network Tasks, click Change settings of this connection.

3.

On the Networking tab, click Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and then click Properties.

4.

If you want incoming users to be able to access the local area network on which the dial-up computer resides, select the Allow callers to access my local area network check box.

5.

Do one of the following:

If you want to automatically assign TCP/IP addresses, click Assign TCP/IP addresses automatically using DHCP.

If you want to specify TCP/IP addresses, click Specify TCP/IP addresses, and do the following:

In From, type the starting IP address.

In To, type the ending IP address.

Based on the addresses you type in From and To, the number of addresses that are allocated is displayed in Total. The starting and ending IP addresses that you choose depend on the originating address space and the number of addresses needed. For more information on defining IP addresses for incoming connections, click Related Topics.

6.

If you want incoming connections to be able to use a specific TCP/IP address, select the Allow calling computer to specify its own IP address check box.

Note

To open Network Connections, click Start, click Control Panel, click Network and Internet Connections, and then click Network Connections

Most TCP/IP networks use subnets in order to effectively manage routed IP addresses. The closest matching subnet is calculated for the range that you specified in From and To. The range of addresses in the closest matching subnet may exceed the range that you specified. Unless the addresses specified in From and To are subnet boundaries, the range based on the calculated subnet will be larger than the range that you specified. To avoid this, specify a range that falls on subnet boundaries. For example, if you are using the 10.0.0.0 private network ID for your intranet, a range that falls on subnet boundaries is 10.0.1.168 to 10.0.1.175. Or, if you are using the 192.168.0.0 private network ID for your intranet, a range that falls on subnet boundaries is 192.168.1.0 to 192.168.1.255.

Allowing remote clients to specify their own TCP/IP address is a potential security risk to your network. A client can impersonate a previously connected client and gain access to network resources that were accessed by the other client.

If you select Allow callers to access my local area network or Allow calling computer to specify its own IP address, these changes take effect immediately.

If you select Assign TCP/IP addresses automatically using DHCP, but there is no DHCP server available, random address from the range 169.254.0.1 to 169.254.255.254 are assigned.

Related Topics

Configure a default gateway

Incoming connections and IP addresses



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