Troubleshooting

What problem are you having?

A router is not advertising itself as a default router.

Cause:  A computer running Windows that is being used as an IPv6 router will not advertise itself as a default router unless it is configured with a default route (::/0) that is configured to be published.

Solution:  Add a default route to the router computer and configure it to be published with the ipv6 rtu command.

See also:  To add an IPv6 route; IPv6 utilities; Setting up an IPv6 test lab

A default route is not present on the host.

Cause:  A computer running Windows that is being used as an IPv6 router will not advertise itself as a default router unless it is configured with a default route (::/0) that is configured to be published.

Solution:  Add a default route to the router computer and configure it to be published with the ipv6 rtu command.

See also:  To add an IPv6 route; IPv6 utilities; Setting up an IPv6 test lab

Address has unexpected interface identifier.

Cause:  A local router is configured to advertise a global prefix. By default, an anonymous address that is based on the global prefix is automatically configured.

Solution:  Use the ipv6 gpu UseAnonymousAddresses no command to disable anonymous addresses.

See also:  IPv6 interface identifiers; IPv6 utilities

Internet Explorer is not connecting when literal IPv6 addresses are used in the URL.

Cause:  The version of the Internet Explorer provided with Windows does not support the format for literal IPv6 addresses in URLs that is described in RFC 2732, "Format for Literal IPv6 Addresses."

Solution:  Create DNS AAAA resource records that resolve Web server names to an IPv6 address and then use Web server names in the URL.

See also:  IPv6 applications; Name resolution

Off-link routes are in the routing table.

Cause:  When a router running Windows advertises off-link prefixes, it sets a reserved bit in the Prefix Information option of the Router Advertisement message. When a host computer running Windows receives an off-link prefix with this bit set, the host adds a route to its routing table for the advertised prefix with the forwarding address of the advertising router.

Solution:  None. This is intended.

See also:  IPv6 routing

Ping6 fails Echo Request messages when specifying a link-local destination.

Cause:  The scope ID is not specified.

Solution:  This is a common problem when a link-local destination address is used. Link-local addresses are often configured automatically for multiple interfaces. To specify the exact interface over which to send Echo Request messages, use the ping6 Address%ScopeID syntax where ScopeID is the interface identifier for the interface over which the ping6 traffic is sent.

See also:  Single subnet with link-local addresses; IPv6 utilities

IPSec traffic is not encrypted.

Cause:  The IPv6 protocol for Windows does not support the use of IPSec Encapsulating Security Payload (ESP) encryption. However, the use of ESP with NULL encryption is supported. Although NULL encryption uses the ESP header, only data authentication and integrity services are provided.

Solution:  None. This is a current limitation of the IPv6 protocol for Windows.

See also:  Security features; Using IPSec between two local link hosts

IPSec in IPv6 is not operating according to local or domain-based IPSec policies.

Cause:  IPSec support for IPv4 traffic is separate from IPSec support for IPv6 traffic. Local or domain-based IPSec policies configured with the IP Security Policies or Group Policy snap-ins are for IPv4 traffic only. These policies have no effect on IPv6 traffic.

Solution:  None. This is a current limitation of the IPv6 protocol for Windows.

See also:  Security features; Using IPSec between two local link hosts

Tunneled traffic is not reaching the destination.

Cause:  Routers or firewalls are dropping IPv4 traffic that has the IP Protocol field value set to 41.

Solution:  All IPv6 traffic that is encapsulated (tunneled) inside of an IPv4 header has the IPv4 Protocol field in the header set to 41. IPv6 tunneled traffic includes traffic that uses IPv4-compatible addresses, 6over4 addresses, and 6to4 addresses. To allow IPv6 tunneled traffic to be forwarded, configure your routers or firewalls to pass IPv4 traffic that has the Protocol field set to 41.

See also:  Security features; Using IPSec between two local link hosts

No IPv4-compatible address is automatically configured on my Automatic Tunneling Pseudo-Interface.

Cause:  You do not have a public IPv4 address assigned to any of your interfaces.

Solution:  Because IPv4-compatible addresses have a global scope and are globally unique, IPv4-compatible addresses that are derived from private addresses are not allowed. Private addresses for the IPv6 protocol for Windows are defined by the following ranges: 10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12, 192.168.0.0/16, and 169.254.0.0/16. Configure a public IPv4 address on one of your interfaces.

Unable to reach other 6to4 sites or the 6bone by using the 6to4 router.

Cause:  Your firewall or Internet router is dropping IPv4 traffic that has the IP Protocol field value set to 41.

Solution:  All IPv6 traffic that is encapsulated (tunneled) inside of an IPv4 header has the IPv4 Protocol field in the header set to 41. IPv6 tunneled traffic includes traffic that uses IPv4-compatible addresses, 6over4 addresses, and 6to4 addresses. To allow IPv6 tunneled traffic to be forwarded, configure your firewall or Internet router to pass IPv4 traffic that has the Protocol field set to 41.

Cause:  You are unable to resolve the DNS name 6to4.ipv6.microsoft.com.

Solution:  By default, the 6to4 service attempts to first resolve the name 6to4.ipv6.microsoft.com to its IPv4 addresses and then choose a relay router. If you cannot resolve the name 6to4.ipv6.microsoft.com, a relay router is not configured and you cannot reach any locations on the 6bone. Type ping 6to4.ipv6.microsoft.com to determine whether you can resolve the name 6to4.ipv6.microsoft.com.

Cause:  You do not have the correct route.

Solution:  View the display of the ipv6 rt command. You should see a 2002::/16 -> 3 route. This route causes all 6to4 traffic to be sent by using the 6to4 tunneling interface.

Cause:  You do not have the correct address.

Solution:  Verify that you have a 6to4 address assigned before attempting to reach a destination. For example, without a 6to4 address, you might be using a link-local address to reach a 6to4 global address. Use the display of the ipv6 if command to determine your address configuration.



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