Administration Guide - Connection Point Services

Version 1.0 

Welcome to the Connection Point Services Administration Guide

Welcome to Connection Point Services Administration Guide. This guide provides instructions for setting up and operating Connection Point Services. Connection Point Services consists of a server and an administration tool. It works in conjunction with Microsoft® Connection Manager, configurable connection software. When implemented, Connection Point Services automates the process of updating your users' computers with new access numbers.

How to Use this Document

The guide is written for network administrators who are familiar with Microsoft® Windows NT® Server version 4.0 or later. Knowledge of Microsoft® Internet Information Server (IIS), World Wide Web (WWW), and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) services is assumed.

The following topics are covered:

Introducing Connection Point Services

Previews Connection Point Services, discusses its purpose, and gives a brief overview of its functionality

Connection Point Services Fundamentals

Describes how Connection Point Services works, including technical details of the external and internal architecture

Setting Up Connection Point Services

Explains how to install and configure the software

Operating Connection Point Services

Discusses the operation and maintenance of Connection Point Services software, including tasks associated with system monitoring as well as server maintenance

Note For more information about using or administering Microsoft Windows NT Server and Microsoft Internet Information Server, see Microsoft Windows NT documentation, Microsoft Windows NT Resource Kit, or Microsoft Internet Information Server documentation.

Hardware Requirements

The minimum hardware requirements for each component are as follows:

Software Requirements

The software requirements for each computer are as follows:

Connection Manager

Connection Manager can run on any of the following operating systems:

Microsoft Windows® 95 

Windows NT Workstation® version 4.0 

Windows NT Server® version 4.0 

Phone Book Administrator

Phone Book Administrator can run on any of the following operating systems:

Windows NT Workstation version 4.0 

Windows NT Server version 4.0 

Important If you are running Phone Book Service and Phone Book Administrator on the same computer, use at least the minimum hardware specified to run Phone Book Service.

Phone Book Service

The Phone Book Service platform includes the following components:

Microsoft Windows NT Server version 4.0 (Windows NT file system recommended) 

Windows NT Service Pack 3 

Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) version 4.0 

Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) version 3.0 (included in Connection Point Services Setup) 

Note To ensure that you have the correct service pack installed, open the Windows NT Server Manager, click Help, and then click About. If the dialog box includes information about Service Pack 3, you are running the correct version of Windows NT. You can find out how to get the latest service pack from the Web site http://www.microsoft.com/ntserver/support/default.asp .

Network Requirements

Phone Book Service requires access through a TCP/IP connection. Phone Book Administrator posts to the server database using the File Transfer Protocol (FTP), and users access the server using the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP). Either posting to the server or accessing the Phone Book Service requires a Point-to-Point Protocol (PPP), Point-to-Point Tunneling Protocol (PPTP), or Ethernet connection.

Introducing Connection Point Services

This section provides a brief introduction to Connection Point Services. It describes the features and benefits of Connection Point Services, outlines the general architecture of the software, discusses Connection Point Services' external dependencies, and provides examples of its use.

Overview of Connection Point Services

This section provides an overview of Connection Point Services software to illustrate how Internet service providers (ISPs) and corporations use Connection Point Services. Topics include the business need addressed by Connection Point Services, the Connection Point Services solution, and the benefits of using Connection Point Services.

The Business Need

A growing ISP faces the challenges of providing an easy way for new users to get online and keeping current users aware of changing Points of Presence (POPs). Many Internet users do not have the level of expertise or the time needed to configure their connection software. In the absence of a Connection Point phone-book update mechanism, Internet users have needed technical support to find out which new POPs and connection types are available and to reconfigure their computers accordingly.

The Connection Point Services Solution

Connection Point Services was developed as a way for ISPs and corporations to easily keep their users aware of their online presence and to provide access numbers, thereby dramatically reducing the need for technical support staff.

Connection Point Services has two components:

Phone Book Service. A Windows NT service that compares users' connection configuration with the most recent files available and downloads the appropriate phone book updates. 

Phone Book Administrator. A tool that updates the phone book database and posts new phone book information to Phone Book Service. 

Key Features

Connection Point Services offers ISPs and corporations the following features for ease of administration, scalability, security, and minimization of bandwidth:

Automatic updating of your users' or employees' access and connect options 

The ability to create a phone book database containing customized information about your POPs 

The ability to create multiple phone book files that post to the server 

Easy archiving of backup copies of phone book data 

Compression of data before posting to the server 

Connection Point Services Architecture

Connection Point Services consists of a server and an administration tool: Phone Book Service and Phone Book Administrator. Connection Point Services works in tandem with Microsoft Connection Manager, configurable connection software, to update users' connection options.

Phone Book Service

Phone Book Service is an Internet Information Server (IIS) extension that validates variables and queries the Connection Point Services database to retrieve and download appropriate files to the copy of Microsoft Connection Manager on a user's computer. For security, the administration tool can be situated behind a firewall. Update information is posted through the firewall to the server by the administration tool.

Phone Book Administrator

Phone Book Administrator is an administration tool used to populate new phone books or edit existing ones. The administration tool interface makes it easy to organize access information in the phone books. Before posting to the server, the administration tool uses a compression utility to create cabinet (.cab) files that increase the speed at which you can download information to your users.

The following diagram is a model of Connection Point Services basic architecture.

 

For more information on Connection Manager, see the next section or refer to the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation. 

Getting the Most out of Connection Point Services

Connection Point Services relies on Microsoft Connection Manager for full functionality. Connection Manager is configurable connection software that resides on your users' computers. The Connection Manager Administration Kit enables Internet service providers (ISPs) or network administrators to create customized versions of Connection Manager for Microsoft Windows NT version 4.0 and Microsoft Windows 95.

With the Connection Manager Administration Kit, you can build a Connection Manager service profile that reflects your organization's identity, setting up a profile with the features that allow users to connect seamlessly to your service. The wizard enables you to specify a phone book that Connection Manager will use. Your service profile can automatically retrieve updates for your users' local phone book file, and your staff spends less time answering user requests for access numbers.

For more information on Connection Manager Administration Kit, see the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation.

Sample Implementations

The following hypothetical scenarios illustrate how Connection Point Services can be used to support an expanding Internet service provider (ISP) and help a corporation provide a solution for secure connection.

ISP Scenario

The following scenario illustrates how Connection Point Services can be used to support an expanding Internet service provider.

ByteComp, Inc., an Internet service provider, is faced with rapid growth and needs to accommodate increasing numbers of subscribers. Much of the ISP's growth is local to its calling area. But ByteComp also has corporate customers whose employees want increased access capabilities while traveling. At the same time, ByteComp wants to replace their expensive 800-number access charges with a lower-cost Internet remote-access solution.

To accommodate its expanding business needs, the company plans to expand its existing remote access infrastructure and also offer a "Business Class" set of higher-quality POPs (Points of Presence) for their demanding corporate customers. ByteComp joins an alliance of ISPs in order to provide coverage outside its service area.

Because many of its new subscribers are inexperienced computer users, ByteComp realizes that increasing the number of regional access numbers and providing remote POPs will generate a higher volume of calls to technical support. The company, faced with an immediate need to automate the process of updating subscribers with access numbers, decides to deploy Connection Point Services.

Phone Book Service is installed on a server running Windows NT 4.0, and Phone Book Administrator is installed on a computer running Windows NT Server or Windows NT Workstation with an Ethernet connection to the server. Personnel authorized by ByteComp use the administration tool to create a phone book that contains all of the trunk-line and connect information that the ISP offers for Internet access. When changes to access numbers occur, the personnel quickly and easily make the changes, using the administration tool to publish the changes.

Publishing creates the updated phone book files and copies them to the server. For each of ByteComp's corporate customers (or different access account types), ByteComp keeps all the phone books on the server running Phone Book Service. In addition, ByteComp may deploy a number of Connection Point servers within the infrastructure to guarantee accessibility for users who are connecting to the Internet from various geographical regions.

With Content Replication System (CRS) version 2.0 or later, the phone book can easily be automatically distributed from a master Connection Point server to a number of slave Connection Point servers. CRS is available in Microsoft Site Server 2.0. For more information on using CRS, see the CRS documentation.

ByteComp uses the Connection Manager Administration Kit wizard to create a customized Connection Manager whose profile includes the company logo, tailored online Help, and a customized Connection Manager. ByteComp then packages the profile and Connection Manager for distribution on compact disc or the World Wide Web.

After Connection Manager and the service profile have been installed on the subscribers' computers, the subscribers are automatically provided with a list of current access phone numbers for their location. Each time subscribers connect, they will effortlessly receive phone book updates.

For more information on Connection Manager and the Administration Kit, see the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation.

Corporation Scenario

The following hypothetical scenario illustrates how Connection Point Services can be used to help support a corporation's need to offer a cost-effective means of telecommuting.

Five Lakes Publishing is a multinational company that spends a significant amount of money on 800 numbers and long-distance dial-up fees so that its employees can telecommute. The 800 numbers are used by home-office employees who live outside the calling area and by employees on business trips. Home-office employees living inside the calling area use a local access number.

The company decides to use Connection Point Services to merge select access numbers in its existing phone book with the phone book of an ISP, because their administrators understand that using the ISP's local phone numbers save money on long distance charges while maintaining a high level of security. Five Lakes Publishing uses Microsoft Connection Manager to automatically differentiate between its local access numbers and the ISP's Points of Presence outside the local calling area. As a result, the difference between local access to the corporate private network and the extended remote access over the Internet using a secure connection is transparent to the employee. Connection Manager connects to the corporate private network when a local remote access number is used and establishes a secure connection to the corporate private network when an ISP phone number is used.

Based on the agreement made with the ISP, Five Lakes Publishing can use the Connection Manager Administration Kit to build a branded version of Connection Manager that includes customized Help files and its own support numbers. Five Lakes Publishing can even use Phone Book Administrator to publish updated phone books to the Connection Point server.

For more information on Connection Manager and the Administration Kit, see the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation.

Connection Point Services Fundamentals

This section provides technical background on how Connection Point Services works. Topics include platform and software architecture, relationships among various components, integrated functionality, and related products.

Platform Architecture

This section describes the Connection Point Services platform architecture—the computers, network configuration, operating systems, services and service components, protocols, and administration.

Platform Overview

Phone Book Service is a Microsoft Internet Information Server (IIS) extension that runs on Windows NT Server version 4.0, with IIS version 4.0 running both the World Wide Web (WWW) and File Transfer Protocol (FTP) services. The WWW service allows the remote client's computer to access the server, and the FTP service accepts updated phone book information posted from Phone Book Administrator.

The Phone Book Administrator allows you to create and edit multiple phone books. It runs on Windows NT Workstation version 4.0 or Windows NT Server version 4.0. The administration tool and server need a TCP/IP connection in order to post phone book information via FTP.

Architecture Model

To enable security, Connection Point Services relies on your private network and Internet site. In a typical configuration, WWW and FTP services reside on the same host, and the private network has a file server behind the firewall.

The basic design of Connection Point Services requires the server to run on the primary WWW/FTP host. Phone Book Administrator resides on a file server shared by workstations on your private network.

Internet sites that require multiple Connection Point servers can use Content Replication System (CRS) version 2.0 or later. Once installed, CRS makes it possible to post phone book updates to one staging server and then automatically update other servers hosting Phone Book Service software.

Configuration Options

Connection Point Services can be installed using several configurations. The following diagram illustrates possible configuration options.

Software Architecture

This section describes Phone Book Service and Phone Book Administrator software architecture, including required data files and WWW and FTP services under IIS. Topics include product design goals and service component descriptions.

Software Overview

The server and administration tool rely on services, software, and data files to perform the functions of updating the database, posting the database and data files to the server, querying the server database, and downloading the appropriate file to Connection Manager.

Key Elements

The server compares phone book versions based on the query variables sent by Connection Manager and responds with the appropriate compressed phone book (.cab) file. The administration tool creates the database and files for the server and then transfers the data using the File Transfer Protocol (FTP).

Phone Book Service Elements

The major elements utilized by the server can be divided into software elements and data elements.

Phone Book Service software elements are described in the following table.

ElementDescription

PBServer.dll

An Internet Information Server (IIS) extension, created using the Internet Server Application Programming Interface (ISAPI). PBServer.dll compares query variables sent by Connection Manager to the PBServer database, and then determines which phone book update is to be downloaded.

ODBC drivers

A set of Open Database Connectivity drivers that read the data residing in the PBServer database.

WWW service

A service used when receiving query variables from Connection Manager or downloading .cab files. The WWW service relies on the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and is available under IIS.

Phone Book Service data elements are described in the following table.

ElementDescription

Cabinet (.cab) files

Compressed data files that contain phone book information for Connection Manager. There are two types of .cab files, Full.cab and Delta.cab files. For more information, see the section "Phone Book Administrator Process Relationships," later in this section.

PBServer.mdb

A database that contains an index of query variable values to enable phone book updates.

Phone Book Administrator Elements

The major elements utilized by the administration tool can be divided into two groups: software and data.

Phone Book Administrator software elements are described in the following table.

ElementDescription

FTP service

A protocol interfaced through IIS that allows the administration tool to transfer the phone book database and .cab files to the server.

User interface

A graphical interface consisting of an executable file (Pbadmin.exe) and supporting drivers. The executable file and supporting drivers allow you to create and maintain phone books, automatically create partial phone books, and compress phone books into .cab files.

Phone Book Administrator data elements are described in the following table.

ElementDescription

Cabinet (.cab) files

Compressed data files that contain phone book information for Connection Manager. There are two types of .cab files, Full.cab and Delta.cab files. For more information, see the section "Phone Book Administrator Process Relationships," later in this section.

Phone book (.pbk) files

Text files that contain lists of POP information. Phone book files are compressed before they are transferred to the server.

Region (.pbr) file

Text file that helps categorize POPs. A POP can reference one of many geographical regions listed in the Region file.

Version (.ver) file

Text file that keeps track of the latest phone-book release.

PBServer.mdb

A database that contains updated query tables for Connection Manager. Phone Book Administrator transfers the database to the server as Newpb.mdb every time a phone book is published.

Phonebook.mdb

A database that contains POP information entered by means of the user interface. See "Phonebook.mdb," of the Connection Point Services Reference for the list of tables contained in the database.

Component Relationships

Connection Point Services relies on the relationship among software, data elements, and external components. The server relies on IIS services using Internet protocols to receive data from the administration tool and download data to Connection Manager.

The following diagram illustrates the basic relationships among some of the elements and components.

Integrated Functionality

Phone Book Service relies on WWW service, provided through IIS, to receive query variables from Connection Manager and download .cab files. Phone Book Administrator relies on FTP service to post the Connection Point Services database (PBServer.mdb), full .cab, and delta .cab files to Phone Book Service.

This section describes the Connection Point Services process flow, detailing each segment of the process.

Key Processes

The key internal processes of Connection Point Services are based on the following two operations:

Phone Book Administrator updates the Connection Point Services database and posts new phone book information to the Phone Book Service. 

Phone Book Service compares query variables sent from Connection Manager with the Connection Point Services database and then downloads the appropriate files. 

Phone Book Service Process Relationships

The following diagram illustrates the processes by which Phone Book Service queries the server database with variable values sent by Connection Manager and then downloads the appropriate .cab file.

The identifiers (S1, S2, S3, and so on) correspond to process steps in the diagram and are described below.

Process stepExplanation

S1

Phone Book Administrator posts server database and .cab files to Phone Book Service. Phone Book Administrator connects to port 20 or 21 to transfer the database and files using FTP.

S2

The .cab files are placed in a phone book directory. The administration tool transfers each .cab file to its corresponding directory, which has the same name as the phone book. A .cab file can be either a partial phone book update (Delta.cab) or a full phone book update (Full.cab).

S3

The database and monitor files are placed in the \Data\Database directory. Phone Book Administrator transfers Newpb.mdb and the text file Newpb.txt (monitor file) to the database directory. Phone Book Service then renames Newpb.mdb to PBServer.mdb.

S4

Connection Manager sends query variables to Phone Book Service. Using the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP), the Phone Book Service receives query variables from Connection Manager.

S5

Query variables are validated by Phone Book Service. They are then used to determine which .cab file the server should retrieve. The following is a list of query variables. Variables preceded by *are sent by Connection Manager but are not queried in this version of Connection Point Services:
*OSArch. CPU Architecture
*LCID. Local ID
PB. Connection Point Phone Book
PbVer. Phone Book version
*Osver. Operating system version
*Cmver. Connection Manager version
Ostype. Operating system
Phone Book Service reads the query variables sent by Connection Manager (PB, PbVer, OSType), and then uses the PB variable to select the correct phone book database. Phone Book Service references the phone book table located in the phone book database and uses the PbVer and OSType variables to determine whether the phone book version located on the user's computer is current and what type of operating system the user is using.
If the phone book version is more than five updates old, a full .cab file is downloaded. If the phone book version is five or fewer versions old, a corresponding delta .cab file is downloaded.

S6

The .cab file path is retrieved. The server uses the path specified in the database to download the indexed .cab file to the client. If no matching .cab file is found, an error message is returned. For a list of error messages, see Connection Point Services Reference Guide.

S7

The .cab file is retrieved by Phone Book Service. The server retrieves the .cab file from the directory specified by the database.

S8

Connection Manager receives the .cab file. The server downloads the .cab file to Connection Manager, which updates the user's phone book.

Phone Book Administrator Process Relationships

The following diagram illustrates the release processes used by the administration tool to create full and partial phone books (delta files) from the database. The administration tool then incorporates the version and region files into .cab files. As part of the posting process, the Connection Point Services database and accompanying .cab files are placed in a posting directory and then transferred to the server.

Note The following diagram uses ByteComp as a fictional phone book name to better illustrate how Connection Point Services uses file, database, and directory naming conventions.

The identifiers prefixed by C (C1, C2, C3, and so on) correspond to process steps in creating phone book files, .cab files, and phone book database updates. The identifiers prefixed by P (P1, P2, P3) correspond to process steps in posting information to Phone Book Service.

Process stepExplanation

C1

Generate full phone book file, up to five delta phone book files, version file, and region file. The tool creates an array of files and puts them into a release directory when building a phone book release.

C2

Create the full .cab file by using the phone book, version, and region files. The tool compresses the full phone book file, version, and region files into a full .cab file.

C3

Create delta .cab files, using delta phone book, version, and region files. The tool compresses delta phone book, version, and region files into delta .cab files.

P1

Add query values to the Connection Point Services database. The values are indexed to match particular .cab files needed to update Connection Manager.

P2

Create new post directory. The tool creates a new post directory unique to the phone book version and post attempt.

P3

Copy .cab files from the release directory to the post directory. The tool copies the .cab files into the unique post directory. It then copies PBServer.mdb and renames it newpb.mdb.

P4

Post the Connection Point Services database and .cab files to the Phone Book Service host. The administration tool uses FTP service to transfer the database and .cab files to the server.

Installing Connection Point Services

This section details the process of installing Connection Point Services at your site. It begins with platform preparation and ends with testing your installation. Each phase provides beginning-to-end steps.

Preparing the Platform

This section describes procedures for preparing the platform on which Connection Point Services runs. The platform consists of the hardware, operating system and companion software.

Important Before installing Connection Point Services, read "Introducing Connection Point Services," and "Connection Point Services Fundamentals." The concepts presented in "Connection Point Services Fundamentals" are critical to installation.

To prepare the platform for Connection Point Services

1.

Design the initial system. 

2.

Gather the necessary hardware and software. 

3.

Establish a test network environment. 

4.

Install and configure the basic platform on the network, including companion software products, services, and service components. 

5.

Test and troubleshoot the platform to be sure it is functioning properly. 

Before You Begin

Hardware and software requirements for Connection Point Services are listed at the beginning of this manual. Connection Point Services relies on your existing Web host configuration to receive HTTP queries from Connection Manager and download phone book updates to your users. The suggested configuration requires that the server to be a primary WWW/FTP host and the administration tool resides on a file server that can be shared on a private network behind a firewall.

Connectivity Requirements

Your connectivity hardware and software should meet the following requirements:

All components must share TCP/IP connectivity. 

Network access is recommended between computers running Phone Book Administrator and Phone Book Service for optimal performance and reliability. 

Remote connection is required to test Connection Point Services full functionality using Connection Manager. 

Setting Up and Configuring the Platform

This section describes how to prepare the computer platforms for the service and administration tool in a pilot or preproduction mode. Pilot mode is strictly for evaluation. Preproduction mode is designed for "going live" with the configuration.

Each server running Phone Book Service must have the Windows NT Server version 4.0 operating system installed and configured with Service Pack 3 or later. In addition, Internet Information Server (IIS) 4.0 must be installed, running WWW and FTP services.

Depending on your need, the computer hosting the administration tool can be configured with Windows NT Workstation version 4.0 or Windows NT Server version 4.0. If you are planning to run the administration tool from workstations operating on your private network, you must specify the directory containing Phone Book Administrator as a shared resource. For more information, see "Setting Up Phone Book Administrator on a File Server," later in this section.

TCP/IP

Phone Book Service is designed to use the standard Internet protocol, Transport Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). Install the Windows NT TCP/IP network protocol on every computerserver, giving each a valid TCP/IP address. To enable this communication, register the computer names and respective TCP/IP addresses in the network's Domain Name System (DNS) server.

Computer Names and IP Addresses

Before you begin, determine and verify the computer names and IP addresses of all the computers on which you will be installing Connection Point Services..

To determine and verify the computer name

1.

In Control Panel, double-click Network. 

2.

Click the Identification tab. The computer name should appear in the dialog box. 

To determine and verify the IP address

1.

On the Start menu, point to Programs, and then click Command Prompt. A Command Prompt window appears. 

2.

At the command prompt, type IPConfig.

Verifying IP Connectivity By Using the PING Utility

The PING utility is useful in testing IP connectivity and Domain Name Server (DNS) entries. The following example shows how to check the DNS entry as well as connectivity between the administration tool computer and the Connection Point server by "pinging" the server name from the computer on which you have installed the administration tool. For more PING command instructions or for more suggestions on what to do if the test fails, see Windows NT Networking Supplement Version 4.0.

To ping a computer by computer name

At the command prompt, type the following, where computer name is the name you have assigned to the computer: 

ping computer_name 

The following is sample output from the command:

C:\>ping computer_name

Pinging computer_name [138.57.7.27] with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 138.57.7.27: bytes=32 time=10ms TTL=126
Reply from 138.57.7.27: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=126
Reply from 138.57.7.27: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=126
Reply from 138.57.7.27: bytes=32 time<10ms TTL=126
If Ping by Computer Name Fails

If you have completed a successful ping by IP address, but a ping by computer name fails, it is likely that the DNS has not been properly configured. In this case, check your DNS settings. (To check DNS settings, open the Network utility in Control Panel, double-click TCP/IP, and then click the DNS tab.) If you are running Windows NT Server 4.0 on your DNS server, you can find information about DNS in the Windows NT Server documentation.

If the ping by computer name fails to confirm a correct DNS entry, you can ping by IP address to test for network connectivity and platform functionality.

To ping a computer by IP address

At the command prompt, type the following, where IP_address is the IP address you haveassigned to the computer: 

ping IP_address 

If Ping by IP Address Fails

If the ping by IP address fails, the administration tool computer and the Connection Point server are not properly networked. Examine the network card and network cables to be sure that each computer is properly connected to the network. Check to be sure that TCP/IP drivers are loaded.

Internet Information Server (IIS)

The server must be using Internet Information Server (IIS) to run Default FTP Site and Default Web Site in order for the Phone Book Service to receive posts from the administration tool and download .cab files to Connection Manager. For more information about IIS, refer to the Internet Information Server Installation and Planning Guide.

To see whether Default FTP and Web Sites are installed

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, then point to Microsoft Internet Information Server, and then click Internet Service Manager. The Microsoft Management Console (MMC) appears. 

2.

Click IIS to expand the tree. 

3.

Click on the server name. FPT and Web Sites are listed. 

If Default FTP and Web Sites are not installed, refer to your Internet Information Server Installation and Planning Guide for installation procedures.

If No Services Are Listed

If Microsoft Management Console does not display a list of services, click Connect to Server on the Properties menu and type the name of the computer. (For details on how to open the ISM window, see "Setting Up and Configuring the Platform: Internet Information Server.") If this does not resolve the problem, see the Internet Information Server (IIS) documentation for further information.

Setting Up and Configuring Connection Point Services

The Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack Setup program has a graphical interface to help you install the server and the administration tool.

Installing Phone Book Service

Phone Book Service Setup creates directories and copies all of the executable and supporting files that the server needs. In order for registry updates to take effect, you must restart Internet Information Server (IIS) services. In addition, you must allow users other than "anonymous" to access FTP services.

To install Phone Book Service

1.

Log on to your Connection Point server as a Windows NT administrator. 

2.

On your server computer, install Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack with Internet Information Server version 4.0. 

3.

Read the license agreement, and if you accept it, click Accept. 

4.

When prompted, click Custom. (If you have already installed any part of the Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, click Add/Remove) 

5.

In the Select components list, click Internet Connection Services for RAS, click Show Subcomponents, and then click the components you want to install.

6.

Click Connection Point Services, click Show Subcomponents, and then make sure Phone Book Service is selected. 

At the end of Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack Setup, you will need to restart your computer.

Confirming that Phone Book Service Setup Was Successful

Confirming that the server setup was successful includes verifying that virtual directories are listed in IIS services and that all physical directories are created and files copied. Verifying virtual directories helps ensure that Setup allows data to be posted to the server. Verifying the created directories and copied files indicates that Setup was successful.

Verify that Virtual Directories Are Listed

Verify that FTP and WWW services list the correct virtual directories by seeing that the FTP service lists PBSData as a virtual directory and that the WWW service lists PBServer as well as PBSData.

To verify the virtual directory through the FTP service

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Microsoft Internet Information Server, and then click Internet Service Manager

2.

Double-click the name of the computer running the FTP service. 

3.

Double-click Default FTP Site

4.

The following directory and alias appear. 

NamePath

PBSData

C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service\Data

To verify virtual directories through the WWW service

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Microsoft Internet Information Server, and then click Internet Service Manager

2.

Double-click the name of the computer running the WWW service. 

3.

Double-click Default Web Site

4.

The following directories and aliases appear. 

NamePath

PBServer

C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service\Bin

PBSDATA

C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service\Data

Verify Physical Directories and Files

For the required directory structure and files, see the "Directories and Files Location" section in the Connection Point Services Reference Guide. 

To verify physical directories and files

Using Windows NT Explorer, double-click the \Data directory under C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service. 

Verify that physical directories were created and files were copied. 

Setting Up and Configuring Phone Book Administrator

You have the option of installing the administration tool, Phone Book Administrator, on a dedicated computer or on a file server and workstations. The administration-tool Setup option copies to the administration computer all of the executable and supporting files needed to run Phone Book Administrator.

Setting Up Phone Book Administrator on a Dedicated Computer

The following steps describe how to set up the administration tool to run on a dedicated computer.

To install Phone Book Administrator

1.

Log on to your Windows NT computer as a Windows NT administrator. 

2.

On your server computer, install Windows NT 4 Option Pack with Internet Information Server version 4.0. 

3.

Read the license agreement, and if you accept it, enter the license holder's name and company.

4.

In the Select components list, click Internet Connection Services for RAS, click Show Subcomponents, and then click the components you want to install.

5.

Click Connection Point Services, click Show Subcomponents, and then make sure Phone Book Administrator is selected. 

File Server and Workstations

Following are the steps for setting up the administration tool to run from a file server.

To set up Phone Book Administrator on a local area network

1.

Follow the instructions in the previous section for installing Phone Book Administrator on a dedicated computer. The dedicated computer in this case would be your file server. 

2.

Specify the directory on the file server that contains Phone Book Administrator as a shared resource. 

3.

Install Phone Book Administrator on the desired networked workstations. The setup process copies the required .dll and .ocx files to the \System32 directory. 

4.

Delete the following directory: C:\Program Files\PBA. 

5.

Edit the Start menu item for Phone Book Administrator so that it points to the PBadmin.exe file located on the file server. 

Removing Connection Point Services

This section discusses some issues that may arise when you remove Connection Point Services on a computer on which you have previously installed components of the service.

Removing Phone Book Service

If you need to delete data or remove the server, you may have to change Windows NT security settings so that you will have access to do so. The following steps outline this process.

To change directory access (for NTFS partitions only)

1.

In Windows NT Explorer, right-click the Data folder under C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service. 

2.

Click Properties

3.

Click the Security tab, and then click Permissions

4.

Select Change as the Type of Access. 

To remove Phone Book Service

1.

In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs

2.

Select Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack

3.

Click Add/Remove

4.

In the Select components list, click Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Show Subcomponents.

5.

Click Connection Point Services, click Show Subcomponents, and then make sure Phone Book Service is not selected. 

When you remove Phone Book Service, you will have to manually delete the data that you want completely removed.

To delete phone book data from the server

1.

Click Start, click Programs, and then click Windows NT Explorer

2.

Delete the Data folder under C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service. 

Removing Phone Book Administrator

If you need to uninstall Phone Book Administrator, you should first remove it. To remove Phone Book Administrator

1.

In Control Panel, double-click Add/Remove Programs

2.

Select Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack

3.

Click Add/Remove

4.

In the Select components list, click Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Show Subcomponents.

5.

Click Connection Point Services, click Show Subcomponents, and then make sure Phone Book Administrator is not selected. 

The process does not remove certain data files, including phone book databases and .pbk, .pbr, and .cab files. If you want a clean installation, you will have to delete those files manually.

To delete phone book data from Phone Book Administrator

1.

Click Start, click Programs, and then click Windows NT Explorer

2.

Delete all folders under C:\Program Files\PBA. 

Testing Your Installation

This section describes procedures for testing Phone Book Service to make sure the preproduction configuration works. Topics include an overview of the testing process, what and how to test, and tips for resolving problems that may arise.

Overview of the Test Process

To test Phone Book Administrator you will need to create a test phone book and post it to the server. However, to test the server's full functionality, you will need to connect to the server with Connection Manager, using a service profile built by the Connection Manager Administration Kit wizard.

The following sections walk you through creating and posting a test phone book using the administration tool. For instructions on how to configure Connection Manager and the needed Connection Manager test profile, see the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation.

Before You Begin

Below is a list of test data for you to use to create a test phone book. It is recommended that you print this table before continuing.

ItemTest data

Phone book name

ByteComp
Note: The phone book name must match the phone book name that was specified with the Connection Manager Administration Kit wizard as the phone book file for downloading when the test profile is created.

POP name

POP1

Country

Canada

Region

<all> (the default selection)

Area code

<none> (press spacebar)

Access number

555-0011

Status

In Service

Server address

Server address 

User name

anonymous

Password

anonymous

Note Some of the fields in the administration tool do not accept certain characters. For a list of reserved characters, please see the section "Fields with Special Requirements."

For information on creating the test profile, refer to the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation. The test profile contains the basic information needed in order to connect, query the server, and download an updated .cab file.

Creating a Test Phone Book

This section tells you how to create a test phone book.

To create a test phone book

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

On the File menu, click New Phone Book

3.

Type the phone book name specified in the preceding table. 

Adding a Test POP

Use the following procedure to add test POP entries. Phone Book Administrator must be running before you begin.

To create POP entries in the test phone book

1.

Select the test phone book, ByteComp, in the administration tool Phone books list. 

2.

On the Edit menu, click Add POP

3.

In the POP name box, type POP1. 

4.

In the Country drop-down list, select Canada

5.

Type a space in the Area code box. 

6.

Type 5550011 for the Access number

7.

In the Status drop-down list, select In Service

Publishing a Test Phone Book to the Server

Publishing the test phone book to the server helps determine that Phone Book Administrator has created the .cab files and database and that there is a connection between the administration tool and server.

Publishing a phone book to the server is a two-step process: creating phone books and then posting them to the server.

To release and post the test phone book database and files

1.

Select the test phone book, ByteComp, in the Phone Book Administrator Phone books list. 

2.

On the Tools menu, click Publish Phone Book

3.

Click Create. The phone book, .cab, region, and version files are created and deposited in the release directory, and the Connection Point Services database located in the C:\Program Files\PBA directory is updated. 

4.

Click Post to transfer the .cab file and database to the server. 

Verifying the Tests

Because Phone Book Administrator creates a .cab file and posts it to the Phone Book Service, one way to verify that the post was successful is to see that the database and .cab file are on the server.

Note To verify that Connection Point Services has full functionality, you will need to use Connection Manager to verify that the new phone book downloads. For information on how to configure Connection Manager by building the needed test profile, see the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation .

To verify that the database and .cab file were posted successfully

1.

Log on to the computer running Phone Book Service as a Windows NT administrator. 

2.

Click Start, click Programs, and then click Windows NT Explorer

3.

View the C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service\Data folder. A new folder called ByteComp should be there, containing a file called 1Full.cab.

4.

View the C:\Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service\Data\Database folder. It should contain the files Newpb.mdb and Newpb.txt.

To verify that the Phone Book Service can transmit the phone book.

1.

Start Internet Explorer. 

2.

Click Address, and then type
http:///PBServer/PBServer.dll?OSArch=0&OSType=2&LCID=1033&OSVer
=4.0.1381&CMVer=6.0.10.0&PBVer=0&PB=ByteComp. 

If the Phone Book Service is working with Internet Information Services properly, it will send the contents of the ByteComp.cab file to your computer, and Internet Explorer will prompt you for whether you want to open it or save it to your computer.

3.

Click Open. If the Phone Book Service is working with your phone book properly, the contents of this file appear. If Phone Book Service is not working, an error message appears.

Operating Connection Point Services

This section provides instructions for operating Connection Point Services. It includes strategies and procedures to use in managing Connection Point Services components under production conditions. A production environment is one in which the process of automating your users' Connection Point Phone Books goes live.

Preparing to Create a Phone Book

Establishing a new phone book is as easy as giving it a name and configuring it for the server, user ID, and password. The name you chose for the phone book must match information in the service profile created by the Connection Manager Administration Kit wizard.

To establish and populate a phone book

1.

Specify the phone book name. The file name must contain eight characters or fewer. 

2.

Determine the server host name or address. 

3.

Determine user names and passwords needed to publish the phone book. 

4.

Specify regions or create a region file. Region name must contain 30 characters or fewer, and can not include commas. By using regions, you can reduce the number of POPs that Connection Manager displays per country, giving the user a more refined list of POPs to choose from. For more information on region files, see the Connection Point Services Reference Guide. 

5.

Specify POP names, access numbers, and access speed. 

6.

Choose POP country and region. 

7.

Determine the service you will be providing for the POP. The following is a list of service types. 

Service flagDescription

Sign On

This POP may be used for sign-on. (Must be checked if the access number is to be displayed by Connection Manager.)

Sign Up

This POP may be used for sign-up.

Surcharge

This POP may have additional charges. (Displays in the More Access Numbers dialog box of Connection Manager.)

Modem

This POP accepts modem connections.

ISDN

This POP accepts Integrated Services Digital Networking (ISDN) connections.

Multicast

This POP supports multicast protocols.

Custom 1

This POP accepts settings specified in the Connection Manager service profile. (Editing the profile for this custom feature will be described in a future knowledge-base article.)

Custom 2

This POP accepts settings specified in the Connection Manager service profile. (Editing the profile for this custom feature will be described in a future knowledge-base article.)

DUN Entry

This POP will use this Dial-up Networking entry when connecting. The entry must match the name in the Connection Manager service profile.

Note Large phone books containing many POPs and duplicate access numbers may cause Connection Manager to pause slightly before displaying the list of access numbers to the user. It will also take longer to download large phone books.

Fields with Special Requirements

The following is a list of fields in Phone Book Administrator that have character restrictions, and the characters that each does not accept.

FieldRestricted Characters

Server host name

Space

Phone Book name

*<>|"?'/\:=%

POP name

Comma ,

DUN entry

Comma ,

Region name

Comma ,

User name

Space

The following is a list of the types of characters that Phone Book Administrator does accept.

FieldCharacters allowed

Area Code

All numbers # * - space

Access Number

All numbers # * - space

Min analog speed

Numerical digits 0-9

Max analog speed

Numerical digits 0-9

Note Phone book names created using double-byte characters cannot be posted to a Connection Point server running on a single-byte version of Windows NT Server version 4.0.

Creating, Configuring, and Deleting Phone Books

Creating a new phone book for use with the Phone Book Service requires two procedures:

1.

Naming the phone book 

2.

Configuring the phone book options 

Phone Book Administrator is capable of posting multiple phone books to the server. However, Connection Manager must be configured to query the Phone Book Service database for those phone books. For more information about the ability of Connection Manager to query for multiple phone books, see the Connection Manager Administration Kit documentation.

Phone books should be named according to their use. For example, you can simply enter all POPs in one phone book, which easily facilitates the roaming feature, or you can create phone books based on areas. After you name a phone book, you need to configure it with the server hostname and the administrative user ID and password.

To name a phone book

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

On the File menu, click New Phone Book

3.

Type the phone book name. 

4.

Click OK

To configure the phone book options

1.

Select the phone book in the Phone books list. 

2.

On the Tools menu, click Options

Type the following information:

Server host name/address (friendly name or IP address) 

Administrative user name 

Administrative password 

3.

Click OK to save the new phone book settings. 

To copy a phone book

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Select the phone book in the Phone books list. 

3.

On the File menu, click Copy Phone Book

4.

When prompted, type the name for the new copy of the phone book. 

Note All phone book data in the original phone book file is maintained in the copy except for the version number, which reverts back to 1.

To delete a phone book

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Select the phone book in the Phone books list. 

3.

On the File menu, click Delete Phone Book. A dialog box appears asking whether you want to delete the phone book. 

4.

Click Yes

After a phone book is deleted, the indexed references are removed. However, released .cab files remain on the administration tool as well as on the server. If you want to remove the .cab files, you must do it manually.

Creating and Editing Region Files

By using regions, you can reduce the number of POPs that Connection Manager displays per country, giving the user a more refined list of POPs to choose from.

Connection Manager requires a phone book file and region file pair. If you do not create a region file, an empty one is created at the same time a phone book is published. The file has the same name as the phone book file and has a .pbr extension. It is located in the phone book directory.

To add a region

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

On the Tools menu, click Regions Editor. The Regions Editor dialog box appears. 

3.

Click Add, and then type the region name. The region is then added to the phone book. 

4.

Click OK

To edit a region

1.

Click the phone book in the Phone books list. 

2.

On the Tools menu, click Regions Editor. The Regions Editor dialog box appears. 

3.

Click the region you want to edit, and then click Edit

4.

Type the change, and then click OK to save the region. 

Phone Book Administrator includes a model region file. See "Sample Region File," in the Connection Point Services Reference Guide.

To import region files

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Click the phone book in the Phone books list. 

3.

On the Tools menu, click Regions Editor. The Regions Editor dialog box appears. 

4.

Click Import

5.

Browse for the region file, and then click OK. The new region will be added to the list.

Note Duplicate regions will be ignored. The regions editor is case-insensitive.

Managing POPs

After a phone book is created, you can use Phone Book Administrator to add or make changes to POP information. You can change a variety of POP information, including POP name, country, region, area code, access number, service status, POP settings, dial-up networking entries, and analog speed.

Before You Begin

POP information specifies how Connection Manager establishes a connection and how access numbers are displayed to the user. For example, when you use the administration tool to indicate a POP surcharge, Connection Manager displays the POP in the "More access" pane instead of the main "Access" pane. This feature can be used to differentiate automatically between remote-access numbers for corporate private networks and secure connections.

To create a POP entry that works with your access-number network configuration, you will need to answer the following questions:

In which country does the POP exist? (The list of countries provided by the administration tool associates the needed Telephony Applications Program Interface (TAPI) country code with the POP so that when the access string is created the correct country code is attached to the area code and access number.) 

Does your POP belong to a region? 

What name will you give the POP? 

What is the area code for the access number? 

What is the access number? 

What POP settings will you require? 

What special Dial-Up Networking settings will you need? The Connection Manager Administration Kit must use the same entry name. 

What is the minimum baud for the POP? 

What is the maximum baud for the POP? 

What is the POP status: In Service or Not In Service? (Only in-service POPs are used in creating phone book files). 

Adding, Editing, and Deleting POPs

The primary purpose of adding and editing POP information is to make updated access information available to your users.

To create POP entries in a phone book

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Select the phone book in the Phone books list. 

3.

On the Edit menu, click Add POP

Click the Access Information tab and type or select the following information:

POP name 

Country 

Region (optional) 

Area code (For countries that do not have area codes, type a space in the Area code dialog box to continue.) 

Access number 

Status: In Service or Not In Service 

Click the Settings tab and enter the following optional information:

Set the service flags available for the POP. 

In the Dial-up Networking entry box, type a name that matches the entry used by the Connection Manager Administration Kit wizard. 

In the Analog speed lists, select the minimum and maximum rate. 

4.

Click the Comments tab and type any comments. Comments are used as an administrative reference and are not published as part of the phone book. 

5.

Click OK to add the POP to the phone book. 

To edit POP information

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Select the phone book in the Phone books list. 

3.

Select a POP entry in the POP information list. 

4.

On the Edit menu, click Edit POP

5.

Follow steps 4 – 6 of the previous procedure, "To create POP entries in a phone book," to configure the phone book. 

6.

Click OK to save the edited POP to the phone book. 

To delete POP entries

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Select the phone book in the Phone books list. 

3.

On the Edit menu, click Delete POP

Publishing Phone Books

After you have created a phone book and added POPs, you are ready to make the phone book available to your users, a step known as publishing the phone book. To publish a phone book, you create a phone book release, and then you post it to the server.

Before you begin publishing phone books, you should verify that the POP status of the POPs you want to publish is set to In Service. Unless changes were made to POPs since the last successful publishing, Phone Book Administrator will not publish the phone book.

To release and post the phone book database and files

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Select the phone book in the Phone books list. 

If you have not done so already, specify the Connection Point server address to which to post the phone book files and database by first clicking Options, and then typing Server address, user name, and password

3.

On the Tools menu, click Publish Phone Book. The Publish Phone Book dialog box appears. 

4.

Type the path name of a release directory. 

5.

Click Create. The phone book, .cab, and version files are created and placed in the release directory. 

6.

Click Post

Notes 

If you specify a release directory on a remote computer, you may have to reset the directory every time you publish a phone book.

Every time you propagate a phone book by posting, it increments the version number of the phone book. If you post to multiple servers, the version numbers will be inaccurate. To propagate a phone book to multiple servers, use the Content Replication System (CRS) in Microsoft Site Server 2.0.

Performing Maintenance Tasks

Maintenance involves preserving the links and processing within and between computers. This section describes procedures for maintaining Connection Point Services, including starting and stopping Phone Book Service, administering security, and backing up files. Use these procedures to keep Connection Point Services running and available to clients.

Starting and Stopping Phone Book Service

For maintenance reasons, Phone Book Service may have to be manually stopped and restarted.

To manually stop and restart Phone Book Service

Move the PBServer.dll file from the \bin directory to another directory. 

To stop WWW service

1.

Open Microsoft Management Console (MMC). 

2.

Click the IIS folder to expand the tree, and click the server name. 

3.

Pause the WWW service. Pausing prevents new client connections but continues to service existing client connections. 

Administering Security and Access Permissions

Phone Book Service relies heavily on the security and access-control features built into Windows NT Server and Internet Information Server (IIS) version 4.0. This section describes an approach to managing permissions, access rights, and other security-related issues for Phone Book Service. If you are not familiar with the Windows NT administration process, you may want to have the network administrator set up the necessary account and permissions.

Administering security and access involves the following tasks:

Setting up an account on the server host 

Setting up account permission for the \Inetpub\wwwroot\Phone Book Service directory 

Typing an administrative user name and password in order to post phone books 

Allowing FTP logons other than "anonymous" 

For more information about administering Windows NT accounts and setting permissions, see the Windows NT Server version 4.0 documentation and online Help.

Setting Up an Account on the Server Host

In order to post to the server securely, you will have to have a valid account on the computer.

Note Phone Book Administrator uses FTP to send the user name and password in an unencrypted format, which may be a security issue for some providers.

Setting Up Administrative Permission for the Phone Book Service Directory

Allowing only system administrators or designated personnel to access the data directory on the server host limits inadvertent phone book updates and keeps the data secure from tampering.

The following instructions assume that you have a Windows NT network security account and that the server hardware is formatted with the Windows NT File System (NTFS).

To create and modify a Windows NT account for posting to the \Phone Book Service directory

1.

Click Start, click Programs, and then click Windows NT Explorer

2.

Right-click the Phone Book Service folder located under C:\Inetpub\wwwroot. 

3.

On the pop-up menu, click Options

4.

Click the Security tab. 

5.

Click Permissions

6.

Select Replace Permissions on Subdirectories

7.

Click Everyone, and then click Remove

8.

Click Add. The Add Users and Groups dialog box appears. 

9.

Point to the administrative group, and then click Change in the Type of Access list. 

Entering the Administrative User Name and Password for Posting

After you limit the permissions to the \Phone Book Service directory, all phone books require an administrative user name and password in order to be posted to the server.

To set up a phone book with an administrative user name and password

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Internet Connection Services for RAS, and then click Phone Book Administrator

2.

Point the phone book you want to post. 

3.

On the Tools menu, click Options

4.

Click the Phone Book Service tab. 

5.

Type the server hostname or address and the administrative user name and password, and then click OK

Note Phone Book Administrator stores your password. You may want to clear your administrative password from the dialog boxes to prohibit unauthorized posting to the server before you close the phone book.

Allowing Users Other than Anonymous to Connect to FTP Services

It is not a requirement to set up FTP service for use with users other than "anonymous." However, for added security it helps ensure that the person posting to the server has an account on it with special permissions.

To allow users other than anonymous

1.

Click Start, point to Programs, point to Windows NT 4.0 Option Pack, point to Microsoft Internet Information Server, and then click Internet Service Manager

2.

Click the IIS folder to expand the tree, and then click the server name. 

3.

Double-click Default FTP Site

4.

Click the Security Accounts tab. 

5.

Clear the Allow only anonymous connections check box. A warning appears indicating that unencrypted passwords can be transmitted over the network. 

6.

Click Yes, and then click OK

Backing Up and Restoring

The process of backing up and restoring data can vary greatly depending on your network configuration. Backing up and restoring is critical to preserving POP and region information. Backing up the database and .cab files on the server is not as critical as backing up the phone book databases and other important files located on the administration-tool computer. The suggested measure is to use a tape drive or some other mass storage device to back up the complete \PBA directory. However, if the computer running the administration tool is a laptop or if mass storage is not possible, you will want to back up the following three key data files by some other means, such as copying to disk:

PBServer.mdb 

phone_book.mdb 

PBadmin.ini 

If you need to reinstall the administration tool and restore the files listed in this section, "Backing Up and Restoring," follow the instructions in the section "Reinstalling Phone Book Administrator." For information on where to copy the files, see the section "Directory and File Location" in the Connection Point Services Reference Guide. The final step is to post the newly restored phone books to the server. If you also have to reinstall Phone Book Service, you will need to republish your phone books.



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