By the numbers

Limited access to digital skills threatens to widen the income gap between those who have the skills to succeed in the 21st century and those who do not.
To reduce the gap, all young people need the opportunity to learn computer science, especially those least likely to have access.

  • More jobs than graduates

    According to Code.org, in 2016, there were 530,472 open computing jobs in the United States but only 42,969 computer science graduates to fill them.

  • Greater economic opportunity

    Computer science majors can earn 40 percent more than the average college graduate according to an economic analysis completed by The Hamilton Project.

  • Closing the gender gap

    According to The Case for Improving U.S. Computer Science Education report, only 22 percent of students who take the Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science exam are female, the largest gender diversity gap of any AP exam. The report also shows that females who try AP Computer Science in high school are 10x more likely to major in it in college.

  • Empowering minority students

    Less than 10 percent of students who take the Advancement Placement (AP) Computer Science exam are Hispanic, and less than 4 percent are Black according to The Case for Improving U.S. Computer Science Education. In addition, the College Board reported that Black and Hispanic students who try AP Computer Science are 7x more likely to major in it in college.

  • Increasing access to AP exams

    Studies such as The Case for Improving U.S. Computer Science Education and STEMtistics reported that only 18 percent of schools accredited to offer Advanced Placement (AP) exams offer the AP Computer Science exam, with the most economically-disadvantaged students least likely to have access.

  • Shrinking the digital divide

    According to Change the Equation, just 53 percent of 12th graders in the US have access to any computer science classes, and the gap is even greater in rural areas where just 30 percent have access.


arabia

Growing up and giving back

Arabia Simeon grew up in a low-income area of Brooklyn, NY, where she didn’t have access to computer science education until her school administration and teachers had the insight to start offering it. She then saw hope not only for herself, but also for her community. Arabia now dreams of combining computer science, art, and social justice to give back to the neighborhood where she grew up.

READ ARABIA'S STORY

Our approach

We partner with nonprofits, governments, educators, and businesses to help increase access to computer science education, so more young people like Arabia Simeon are prepared for a prosperous future.

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