What is supplier diversity?

At Microsoft, it means fostering greater levels of diversity in our supplier base to reflect the global diversity of our customers.

Our commitment to helping people realize their potential extends from our products to our procurement practices to you, the supplier. The Microsoft mission encompasses all people and every area of our enterprise. We embrace a core set of values, and we look for suppliers who share those values and can help us in fulfill our mission.

In fiscal year 2017, we spent more than US$2.6 billion dollars working with suppliers that are minority, disabled, veteran, LGBT, and woman-owned businesses. This is a significant milestone as we seek to achieve year-over-year (YoY) growth in our annual spend with diverse suppliers.

We see no limit to the potential we all might realize together. We believe in creating opportunities for people to succeed—and expect our suppliers to embrace these same values.

Fernando J. Hernandez

“Microsoft serves diverse markets globally,” says Fernando Hernandez, director of Responsible Sourcing at Microsoft, “and we are convinced that our supplier diversity initiatives are a key competitive advantage, helping us win new business, retain customers, and reinforce the Microsoft brand.”

Fernando J. Hernandez,
Supplier Diversity Director

RequirementsAccreditation organizationsFAQ and glossary

Requirements

Who qualifies as a “diverse” business at Microsoft?

For US-headquartered businesses, a diverse business is 51 percent or more owned, operated, and managed by someone who fits in one or more of following categories:

  • Woman who is a US citizen or permanent legal resident of the United States
  • Minority who is a US citizen or permanent legal resident of the United States
  • Veteran who is a US citizen or permanent legal resident of the United States
  • Disabled person who is a US citizen or permanent legal resident of the United States
  • Disadvantaged business (business owner must be a US citizen or permanent legal resident of the United States)
  • LGBT business owner who is a US citizen or permanent legal resident of the United States

Or if the business is:

  • Located in a HUBZone: operates and employs individuals residing in a Historically Underutilized Business Zone (HUBZone), as defined by the US Small Business Administration (SBA)

For non-US headquartered businesses, local regulations and standards apply to the definition and recognition of a diverse supplier.

Microsoft requires that businesses categorized as “diverse” be certified by a third party, and partners with multiple resources to help diverse businesses obtain the necessary information, accreditations, and contacts to get started working with Microsoft.

Accreditation organizations

Official accreditation organizations

Any Microsoft vendor claiming to be diverse must be officially certified as 51 percent or more owned, operated, and managed by minorities, women, or veterans, or must be an SBA-certified HUBZone (Historically Underutilized Business Zone).

Preferred third-party certifications (United States only):

Women's Business Enterprise National Council

Women's Business Enterprise National Council

A national organization that certifies women-owned businesses (WBE)

Visit WBENC.org
National Minority Supplier Development Council

National Minority Supplier Development Council

A national organization that certifies minority-owned businesses (MBE)

Visit NMSDC.org
National Veteran Business Development Council

National Veteran Business Development Council

A national organization that certifies veteran-owned businesses

Visit NVBDC.org
US Business Leadership Network

US Business Leadership Network

A national organization that certifies disabled-owned businesses (DBE)

Visit USBLN.org

National LGBT Chamber of Commerce

A national organization that certifies gay/lesbian-owned businesses (LGBTBE)

Visit NGLCC.org

Federal agencies

Standards for small disadvantaged, HUBZone, and small businesses

Visit SBA.gov

The Microsoft Supplier Diversity Program will accept many other state, county, or city certifications. Please contact Supplier Diversity at mwvbe@microsoft.com if you have questions about other Microsoft approved third-party certification agencies/organizations.

Microsoft board memberships and partners:

Billion Dollar Roundtable

Billion Dollar Roundtable

National Minority Supplier Development Council

National Minority Supplier Development Council

Northwest Mountain MSDC

Northwest Mountain MSDC

Women’s Business Enterprise National Council

Women’s Business Enterprise National Council

Women’s Business Enterprise Council - Pacific

Women’s Business Enterprise Council - Pacific

United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Women Presidents’ Organization

Women Presidents’ Organization

Women Presidents’ Educational Organization

Women Presidents’ Educational Organization

National Veteran Business Development Council

National Veteran Business Development Council

Technology Industry Group

Technology Industry Group

US Business Leadership Network

US Business Leadership Network

National LGBT Chamber of Commerce

National LGBT Chamber of Commerce

University of Washington Foster School of Business

UW Foster School of Business

Stanford School of Business

Stanford School of Business

Business Consortium Fund, Inc.

Business Consortium Fund, Inc.

Registering your interest

If you are a certified diversity supplier interested in becoming a Microsoft supplier, please register your interest below. This information will be used to create an account at the Microsoft Procurement Supplier Portal site. Once registered, you will have access to the registration web site and may update your profile at any time. Registering does not guarantee that your company will become a supplier for Microsoft, however, by registering, you alert Microsoft buyers of your interest and provide them with information to help them determine whether your company is appropriate for consideration.

Register your interest