Microsoft Research Blog

The Microsoft Research blog provides in-depth views and perspectives from our researchers, scientists and engineers, plus information about noteworthy events and conferences, scholarships, and fellowships designed for academic and scientific communities.

  1. Searching for Your Information? Go PHLAT Out

    By Rob Knies, Managing Editor, Microsoft Research When you’re looking for information you have stored on your computer, you have a couple of choices. You can search for it, using, for example, Windows® Desktop Search. Or you can browse for it in your file structure. Those tactics commonly are considered two separate, discrete options. But are they, really? When you’re gathering all the information relevant to a particular project, you have to comb through your…

    March 14th, 2006

  2. Too Many E-Mails? SNARF Them Up!

    By Rob Knies, Managing Editor, Microsoft Research Vacation’s over. You’ve had a grand time: intriguing locales, fun events, delicious food, memorable moments. You’re relaxed, your batteries recharged. Life is good. You get home and fire up your laptop to see how things have been going at work while you were gone. That’s when you’re accosted by grim reality: hundreds upon hundreds of e-mails, each demanding your attention, your action, your time. How can you even…

    November 30th, 2005

  3. Sensor Networks Get a Kick-Start

    By Rob Knies, Managing Editor, Microsoft Research Feng Zhao has a vision. He sees a future in which a Reality Browser enables people from around the world to query the physical world, live and up close, from anywhere. He sees a virtual global observatory, a Macroscope, if you will, that enables a user to monitor Earth’s entire environment simultaneously. To underscore Microsoft Research’s continuing commitment to such innovations in the discipline of sensor networks, Zhao’s…

    November 12th, 2005

  4. Keeping E-Mail Safe: Microsoft Co-Sponsors Conference on E-Mail and Anti-Spam

    By Rob Knies, Managing Editor, Microsoft Research Joshua Goodman’s grandfather recently got himself a new computer. He’s a medical writer who had been accustomed to typing his columns and mailing them to his publishers. But the publishers increasingly began to ask that he submit his material via e-mail, so he went out and purchased a new PC. Joshua Goodman’s grandfather is 90 years old. Such stories—we’ve all heard them—illustrate the importance society has come to…

    July 14th, 2005

  5. OMM: Mantra for Mobile Devices

    By Rob Knies, Managing Editor, Microsoft Research Eric Horvitz is sitting at his desk in his Redmond, Wash., office, discussing Microsoft Outlook Mobile Manager 2.0 (OMM), a just-released, downloadable add-in for Microsoft Outlook, when something on his computer monitor catches his eye. The new application has flagged as urgent an incoming e-mail from somebody wanting to join the discussion. Moments later, she calls in, gratefully. OMM has made its latest convert. OMM brings the power…

    July 6th, 2005

  6. Using Wi-Fi to Make Your Device Find Where You Are

    By Rob Knies, Managing Editor, Microsoft Research John Krumm, a researcher for Microsoft Research, is one of four co-writers of Accuracy Characterization for Metropolitan-Scale Wi-Fi Localization, a research paper accepted for presentation during MobiSys 2005, the Third International Conference on Mobile Systems, Applications and Services, to be held June 6-8 in Seattle. In the days before the event, Krumm, whose co-writers included Yu-Chung Cheng, of the University of California, San Diego; and Yatin Chawathe and…

    June 6th, 2005

  7. Susan Dumais: Changing the Way People Search for Information, Through Algorithms and User Interfaces

    Senior Microsoft Corp. Researcher Susan Dumais predicts that in 10 years, we will look back on today's search interfaces and recognize them as a simple and limited way to interact with information. After all, she explains, a 5-inch-long rectangle with a long list of text results beneath it doesn't do much to help people make sense of the billions upon billions of unorganized bits of data in the world. Dumais sees plenty of room for…

    April 5th, 2005

  8. Hugues Hoppe: Redefining Computer Graphics

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research Hugues Hoppe is a quiet man. He sits quietly, he talks quietly, and his smile, which he uses often, is as calm as Mona Lisa. For such a quiet man, he's made himself heard in the world of graphics research. ACM SIGGRAPH has recognized his achievements with a Computer Graphics Achievement Award for his work in progressive meshes, surface reconstruction, geometry texturing and geometry images. The award is a…

    January 3rd, 2005

  9. The Language of Biology

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research If you want to go to another country, it would behoove you to learn the language of the land. Luca Cardelli, an Italian researcher working in England, knows this lesson well. He wants to help scientists travel to an unknown country — the membranes and cells of our bodies — and feel right at home. To do this, he is developing a computer language to model the processes of…

    December 15th, 2004

  10. What A Way to Go

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research Go is more than a game. It spans centuries, it's integrated into religion, politics, and business, it's been embraced by poets and warriors, and it's considered one of the great artificial intelligence challenges today. Thore Graepel, a scientist in the Machine Learning and Perception group at Microsoft Research Cambridge, and a Go player with the status of first Dan, has spent many years contemplating a computer program that could…

    December 13th, 2004

  11. How to Build a Smart World

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research Isaac Asimov, the famous science fiction writer, had a vision of a world called Gaia. Gaia was a world that was aware of its inhabitants — it could heal them and react to them. It was a part of them. We'd have to wait a million years or so for this type of biological utopia. However, we can create a physical world that is more aware and helpful -…

    November 26th, 2004

  12. Diving in the Deep End of the Web

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research The Web is more complex than it seems on the surface. There is a hidden Web that lies below the Web that we see in our daily surfing. This hidden Web contains structured information dynamically generated by online Web databases that aren't easy to access or crawl. Researchers from Microsoft Research Asia are developing datamining techniques that they hope will make it easier to simultaneously search multiple backend databases…

    November 22nd, 2004