Microsoft Research Blog

The Microsoft Research blog provides in-depth views and perspectives from our researchers, scientists and engineers, plus information about noteworthy events and conferences, scholarships, and fellowships designed for academic and scientific communities.

  1. Susan Dumais: Changing the Way People Search for Information, Through Algorithms and User Interfaces

    Senior Microsoft Corp. Researcher Susan Dumais predicts that in 10 years, we will look back on today's search interfaces and recognize them as a simple and limited way to interact with information. After all, she explains, a 5-inch-long rectangle with a long list of text results beneath it doesn't do much to help people make sense of the billions upon billions of unorganized bits of data in the world. Dumais sees plenty of room for…

    April 5th, 2005

  2. Hugues Hoppe: Redefining Computer Graphics

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research Hugues Hoppe is a quiet man. He sits quietly, he talks quietly, and his smile, which he uses often, is as calm as Mona Lisa. For such a quiet man, he's made himself heard in the world of graphics research. ACM SIGGRAPH has recognized his achievements with a Computer Graphics Achievement Award for his work in progressive meshes, surface reconstruction, geometry texturing and geometry images. The award is a…

    January 3rd, 2005

  3. The Language of Biology

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research If you want to go to another country, it would behoove you to learn the language of the land. Luca Cardelli, an Italian researcher working in England, knows this lesson well. He wants to help scientists travel to an unknown country — the membranes and cells of our bodies — and feel right at home. To do this, he is developing a computer language to model the processes of…

    December 15th, 2004

  4. What A Way to Go

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research Go is more than a game. It spans centuries, it's integrated into religion, politics, and business, it's been embraced by poets and warriors, and it's considered one of the great artificial intelligence challenges today. Thore Graepel, a scientist in the Machine Learning and Perception group at Microsoft Research Cambridge, and a Go player with the status of first Dan, has spent many years contemplating a computer program that could…

    December 13th, 2004

  5. How to Build a Smart World

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research Isaac Asimov, the famous science fiction writer, had a vision of a world called Gaia. Gaia was a world that was aware of its inhabitants — it could heal them and react to them. It was a part of them. We'd have to wait a million years or so for this type of biological utopia. However, we can create a physical world that is more aware and helpful -…

    November 26th, 2004

  6. Diving in the Deep End of the Web

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research The Web is more complex than it seems on the surface. There is a hidden Web that lies below the Web that we see in our daily surfing. This hidden Web contains structured information dynamically generated by online Web databases that aren't easy to access or crawl. Researchers from Microsoft Research Asia are developing datamining techniques that they hope will make it easier to simultaneously search multiple backend databases…

    November 22nd, 2004

  7. Find Your Lost Data

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research The more data you have, the more you know The more you know, the more you forget. The more you forget, the less you know. So why have data? Microsoft Researchers have an answer for this old, slightly twisted riddle. They've put together a nifty interface that will find all the data on your PC that you need, be it email, documents, tablet notes or spreadsheets. You can find…

    November 12th, 2004

  8. How Much is Your Time Worth?

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research How would you feel if a co-worker barged into your office every few minutes to blurt out updates about their life or project? You might tell them that you are busy, but the damage has been done. You've been interrupted, and getting back on task might be difficult. Eric Horvitz and his team in the Adaptive Systems and Interaction group have been working for a number of years on…

    November 10th, 2004

  9. New Ways to Search the Web

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research Sometimes the whole is not greater than the sum of its parts. Sometimes the whole doesn't even represent its parts. Take a Web page for instance. Is all the text on a Web page a variation on the whole? Probably not. There might be weather reports mixed with tips on the newest hairdos, opinion pieces mixed with ads for whiter teeth, articles about national security mixed with links to…

    November 8th, 2004

  10. Squeeze the Screen

    By Suzanne Ross, Writer, Microsoft Research If you've never seen some of the ingenious ways that researchers have invented to make viewing data on a small screen easy, you might say, "I'll never do all my computing on a PDA or Smartphone." You might concede that it would be nice, handy even, but refuse to believe that it's practical. Patrick Baudisch is one of the researchers who could convince you otherwise. An expert in the…

    October 27th, 2004

  11. Zooming in on Small Displays

    By Suzanne Ross Bigger used to be better, but smaller is suddenly superior. The only problem with small versus big in high-tech gadgets is that our eyes weren't designed to peer at small screens on mobile phones. Even if we are under forty. Eric Horvitz, the research manager for the Adaptive Systems and Interaction group, knew that as small devices such as cell phones and PDAs became an essential part of our lives, we'd want…

    October 20th, 2004

  12. Show and Tell

    By Suzanne Ross Remember when you brought your favorite toy, household object or bug and shared it with the class on Show and Tell day? Most kids were excited about sharing anything and everything with anyone. But then we grew up and started being selective about who would share our toys. In the workplace, and at home, the computer has given us a great opportunity for collaboration and sharing. But who should we share our…

    October 19th, 2004