Summer School on Internet of Things 2016

Summer School on Internet of Things 2016

Summary

The Microsoft Summer School on the Internet of Things took place in Kazan, Russia, from July 17 to 23, 2016. Our summer schools provide a unique opportunity for students to learn about fundamental and state-of-the-art results and to mingle with world leaders in the field.

The 2016 Microsoft Research summer school approached the broad field of the Internet of Things (IoT) by considering the models and concepts surrounding distributed computations, ubiquitous computing, architectures for sensor networks, infrastructure support for smart real-world objects, interaction in smart environments, and privacy and security concepts. We will look at flexible platforms for experimental research that connect devices in homes and beyond.

Invited speakers and courses

  • Nilanjan Banerjee, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA – Applications on the Lab of Things
  • Carlo Alberto Boano, Graz University of Technology, Austria – Dependable IoT communications
  • Gerd Kortuem, TU Delft, The Netherlands and Claire Rowland, Independent UX Consultant, UK – Designing Connected Products and Services for the Internet of Things
  • Dimitrious Lymberopolous, Microsoft Research, USA – Indoor Location
  • Luca Mottola and Mikhail Afanasov, Politecnico di Milano, Italy – Networked Embedded Software
  • Thomas Ploetz, University of Newcastle, UK – Sensing and Sense Making: Wearables, Ubiquitous Computing, and (Applied!) Machine Learning
  • Atul Prakash, University of Michigan, USA – Security of Smart Things

Executive Speakers

  • Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research – Microsoft and Your Future
  • Denis Makrushin, Kaspersky Lab, Russian Federation – From smart homes to smart cities: how secure is smart world around us?
  • Irina Selezneva, Kaspersky Lab, Russian Federation – Kaspersky Academy
  • Alberto Silitti, Innopolis University – Agile Approaches to the IoT

Organizing team

  • Judith Bishop, School Director
  • Alexander Popov, Microsoft Russia – management
  • Marina Neverova, Microsoft Russia – management

Dates and Schedule

The school begins with an information session and dinner on Sunday, July 17, 2016, and ends with student demos and a banquet on Saturday, July 23, 2016. Lectures and practical sessions will run from Monday to Saturday, with a half day on Wednesday. Thus travelling on Sunday July 17 and Sunday July 24 is possible.

Each course has six hours and may consist of lectures and/or hands-on sessions. In the morning and afternoon, there are also half-hour slots for contextual talks or additional activities.

Participation

Advanced undergraduates, MS and PhD students, young scientists (35 or younger), and developers who are interested in the Internet of Things are encouraged to apply. The school is aimed at Russian residents primarily, but students residing abroad who do not need a visa to enter Russia may apply (see Russian-language FAQ).

English is the working language of the school. Fluency in English is required and knowledge of Russian is strongly recommended. Minimal necessary background includes an introductory algorithms class and basic programming skills.

Students who are accepted into the summer school pay no tuition, and the school covers their accommodations, meals, and social program. The students do pay for their travel to Kazan and back. A limited number of partial or full travel grants may be provided.

Application

Dates: Qualified candidates should complete their applications and submit them by May 6, 2016. Acceptance decisions were made on June 6, 2016.

Application materials: A transcript, short CV, a term or research paper, and optional supporting material can be uploaded and updated any time until the application deadline of May 30, 2016.

For more details: see the official event site FAQ (Russian) or send questions via email to msrschl@microsoft.com.

Venue

The Summer School will be held at the beautiful Grand Hotel in Kazan, where all speakers and students will be accommodated. The “Grand Hotel Kazan” is an ultramodern hotel, officially opened in February 2009, located in the heart of the Kazan city. with a panoramic view over the city centre. The hotel is within walking distance of the famous sights of Kazan, such as Kazan Kremlin, Kul-Shariff Mosque, State Academic Opera and Ballet Theatre, and the Russian Drama Theatre named after Kachalov. The hotel is directly connected to the The Mall “Koltso” and the underground station located in this Shopping Centre.

Kazan is one of the top IT innovation centers in Russia, an important cultural, sports, and political center. The city is more than 1,000 years old and offers plenty of museums, historical sites, and established theatres. Kazan lies at the confluence of the Volga and Kazanka Rivers in European Russia and is a one-hour flight from Moscow. Kazan is the capital and largest city of the Republic of Tatarstan, Russia. With a population of more than one million, it is the eighth most populous city in Russia.

Kazan, Tartarstan, Russia

Kazan, Tartarstan, Russia

Agenda

Sunday, 17 July

Time Session
18:00
Registration at Grand Hotel
19:00
Welcome party with buffet dinner

Monday, 18 July

*Download the agenda

Time Session Speaker
09:00
Sensing and Sense Making: Wearables, Ubiquitous Computing, and (Applied!) Machine Learning
Thomas Ploetz
10:30
Break
11:00
Indoor Location
Dimitrios Lymberopolous
12:30
Welcome and Introductions
Judith Bishop
13:00
Lunch
14:00
Networked Embedded Software
Mikhail Afanasov
15:30
Break
16:00
Networked Embedded Software
Carlo Alberto Boano
17:30
Introduction to the TI Kit
Carlo Alberto Boano
18:00
Introduction to MS Band Equipment
Thomas Ploetz
18:30
Free
19:00
Dinner
20:30
Excursion around Kazan (optional)
Students and Speakers

Tuesday, 19 July

Time Session Speaker
09:00
Applications on the Lab of Things
Nilanjan Banerjee
10:30
Break
11:00
Dependable IoT communications
Carlo Alberto Boano
12:30
Introduction to Lab of Things Equipment
Nilanjan Banerjee
13:00
Lunch
14:00
Sensing and Sense Making: Wearables, Ubiquitous Computing, and (Applied!) Machine Learning
Thomas Ploetz
15:30
Break
16:00
Indoor Location
Dimitrios Lymberopolous
17:30
Introduction to Location Equipment
Dimitrios Lymberopolous
18:00
Team Forming
Judith Bishop
18:30
Free
19:00
Dinner

Wednesday, 20 July

Time Session Speaker
09:00
Dependable IoT communications
Carlo Alberto Boano
10:30
Break
11:00
Applications on the Lab of Things
Nilanjan Banerjee
12:30
Project Q&A
Judith Bishop
13:00
Lunch
14:00
Indoor Location
Dimitrios Lymberopolous
15:30
Break
16:00
Networked Embedded Software
Carlo Alberto Boano
17:30
Tutorial Session
All
18:30
Free
19:00
Dinner

Thursday, 21 July

Time Session Speaker
09:00
Designing Connected Products and Services for the Internet of Things
Gerd Kortuem
10:30
Break
11:00
Sensing and Sense Making: Wearables, Ubiquitous Computing, and (Applied!) Machine Learning
Thomas Ploetz
12:15
Agile Approaches to the IOT
Alberto Sillitti
13:00
Lunch
14:00
Visit to Innopolis University or free time
Students
19:00
Dinner

Friday, 22 July

Time Session Speaker
09:00
Applications on the Lab of Things
Nilanjan Banerjee
10:30
Break
11:00
From smart homes to smart cities: how secure is smart world around us?
Denis Makrushin
12:15
Kaspersky Academy
Irina Selezneva
13:00
Lunch
14:00
Designing Connected Products and Services for the Internet of Things
Gerd Kortuem
15:30
Break
16:00
Security of Smart Things
Atul Prakash
17:30
Tutorial
All
18:30
Free
19:00
Dinner

Saturday, 23 July

Time Session Speaker
09:00
Designing Connected Products and Services for the Internet of Things
Gerd Kortuem
10:30
Break
11:00
Security of Smart Things
Atul Prakash
12:30
Microsoft and Your Future
Judith Bishop
13:00
Lunch
14:00
Security of Smart Things
Atul Prakash
15:30
Break
16:00
Poster Session and Judging
All
18:30
Free
19:00
Closing Banquet

*Download the agenda

Speakers

Mikhail Afanasov, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Mikhail AfanasovMikhail Afanasov is a research fellow in Politecnico di Milano. He obtained his PhD degree from Politecnico di Milano in 2015, with a thesis on self-adaptive cyberphysical systems software. In his research Mikhail focuses on the software design for networked embedded software with a particular focus on the context-awareness and self-adaptiveness. Mikhail’s research interests are including but not limited to Drone Sensor Networks, Networked Embedded Software, Wireless Sensor Networks, and Cyberphysical Systems.

Nilanjan Banerjee, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA

Nilanjan BanerjeeNilanjan Banerjee is an Associate Professor in Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at University of Maryland Baltimore County. He is a NSF Career Awardee and has received a Microsoft Research Software Engineering Innovations Award. His expertise is in the areas of sensor, mobile, and embedded systems.

Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research, USA

Judith BishopJudith Bishop is Director of Computer Science in Microsoft Research, USA. Her role is to create strong links between Microsoft’s research groups and universities globally, through encouraging projects and contests, supporting events, summits and summer schools, and engaging directly in research. She leads the Open Source Initiative and Quantum Computing outreach. Previous projects include the BBC micro:bit, Code Hunt, TouchDevelop and TryF#. Judith’s research expertise is in programming languages and distributed systems, with a strong practical bias. After studying in South Africa, Judith received her PhD from the University of Southampton, UK. She then served as a professor, most recently at the University of Pretoria. Judith is an ACM Distinguished Member, and has received the IFIP Silver Core Award, among other awards. She is a Fellow of the British Computer Society and the Royal Society of South Africa.

Carlo Alberto Boano, Graz University of Technology, Austria

Carlo Alberto Boano

Carlo Alberto Boano is an assistant professor at the Institute for Technical Informatics of Graz University of Technology, Austria. He received a doctoral degree with distinction from TU Graz in 2014, with a thesis on dependable wireless sensor networks. Before joining TU Graz, he was researcher at the University of Lübeck, Germany (2009-2013) and at the Swedish Institute of Computer Science, Sweden (2008-2009). Carlo Alberto’s current research interests encompass the design of dependable networked embedded systems, with emphasis on the energy-efficiency and reliability of low-power wireless communications, as well as on the robustness of IoT protocols against environmental influences.

Gerd Kortuem, TU Delft, The Netherlands

Gerd KortuemGerd Kortuem is professor of Computing at the Open University the UK and deputy director of the smart city project MK:Smart. His research focuses on the design of connected services—in particular, in the context of energy and mobility. Most recently, he has been exploring data-driven design methods for the Internet of Things for incorporating sensor data about people’s behaviors and practices into the design process. Before joining academia, Gerd worked as software developer for IBM and Apple.

Dimitrious Lymberopolous, Microsoft Research, USA

Dimitrious Lymberopolous is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research. His work focuses on low power sensing architectures, indoor location technologies and mobile context sensing for web search services. Since 2014 he has been organizing the Microsoft Indoor Localization Competition, a prime venue where academia and industry come together to benchmark the latest indoor location technologies. Dimitrios received his Ph.D. degree from the Electrical Engineering department at Yale University in 2008, where he designed and implemented wireless sensor networks for privacy-preserving, in-home elderly care monitoring.

Denis Makrushin, Kaspersky Lab

Denis Makrushin

Denis is the threat expert of Global Research and Analysis Team at Kaspersky Lab. He is a permanent speaker at international security conferences and specialized in threat researches.

Denis gained diverse experience while working in the information security area. He was engaged in penetration testing and security audit of corporate web-apps, stress testing information and banking systems for DDoS-attacks resistance, and he took part in the organization and produce of the international forum on practical security issue. He had time to look at the industry from the defending side perspective and provided information protection of energy facilities (integration and administration information security systems).

Denis graduated from National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Information Security Faculty. He continues research in the DDoS protection in postgraduate of MEPhI.

Luca Mottola, Politecnico di Milano, Italy

Luca MottolaLuca Mottola is an associate professor at Politecnico di Milano (Italy) and a senior researcher at SICS Swedish ICT. He completed his Ph.D. at Politecnico di Milano (Italy) in 2008. His research interests focus on modern networked embedded systems, with the current focus on the Internet of Things, Cyberphysical Systems, Drone Sensor Networks, and Low-power Wireless Sensing. His research recently earned him the Google Faculty Award, he was listed amongst Postscapes “Internet of Things Top 100 Thinkers,” and he was also awarded the ERCIM Cor Baayen Award, the MIT TR Italia Young Innovator Award, the EWSN/CONET European Best Ph.D. Thesis Award, the Best Paper Award at ACM/IEEE IPSN 2011, and the Best Paper Award at ACM/IEEE IPSN 2009. Luca routinely serves on the program committees of top conferences such as ACM SENSYS, ACM/IEEE IPSN, IEEE ICDCS, EWSN, and IEEE INFOCOM. He was PC co-chair for IEEE DCOSS 2015.

Thomas Ploetz, University of Newcastle, UK

Thomas PloetzThomas Ploetz is a Computer Scientist with expertise and almost 15 years experience in Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning research (PhD from Bielefeld University, Germany). His research agenda focuses on applied machine learning, that is developing systems and innovative sensor data analysis methods for real world applications. Primary application domain for his work is computational behaviour analysis where he develops methods for automated and objective behaviour assessments in naturalistic environments. Main driving functions for his work are “in the wild” deployments and as such the development of systems and methods that have a real impact on people’s lives.

Thomas works at the School of Computing Science at Newcastle University in Newcastle upon Tyne, UK, where he holds a Senior Lectureship (Assoc. Prof.) for “Context Aware Computing”. He is affiliated with Open Lab, Newcastle’s interdisciplinary research centre for cross-disciplinary research in digital technologies. Within Open Lab he leads the machine learning and ubiquitous computing research team — a group of 15 researchers (PhD students and postdoctorate research associates) who specifically work on applied machine learning projects primarily related to computational behaviour assessments within the wider ubicomp and wearables field.

Atul Prakash, University of Michigan, USA

Atul PrakashAtul Prakash is Professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Division at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. He received B.Tech. in Electrical Engineering from IIT Delhi in 1982, M.S. in Computer Science from UC Berkeley in 1984 and Ph.D. in EECS from University of California, Berkeley in 1989. His research is in the area of security and privacy of computer systems. His recent work has been analyzing the security of mobile operating systems and emerging Internet of Things programming environments and designing mechanisms to improve their security. He has served as Director of the Software Systems Lab in EECS at the University of Michigan. He also led the creation of the new Data Science undergraduate program at the University of Michigan. You can find more information about his research and teaching on the EECS website.

Claire Rowland, Independent UX Consultant, UK

Claire RowlandClaire Rowland is an independent UX and product consultant specializing in the Internet of Things. She has a particular interest in taking connected products from an early adopter user base to the mass market, and technologies that support mundane, everyday activities. Before becoming independent, she worked on energy management and home automation products as the service design manager for AlertMe.com, a connected home platform provider. Previously, she was head of research for design consultancy Fjord, where she led EU-funded R&D work investigating the inter-usability of interconnected embedded devices. She has worked in UX design and research for mobile, multiplatform, and web services since 1997.

Alberto Silitti, Innopolis University, Russian Federation

Alberto SillittiAlberto Sillitti, Ph.D., PEng is Full Professor of Software Engineering at the Innopolis University (Russian Federation) where he is also the director of the Cyber-Physical Systems Lab. He holds a PhD in Electronics and Computer Engineering received from the University of Genoa (Italy) in 2005. From 2005 to 2010 he has been Assistant Professor and from 2010 to 2015 Associate Professor at the Free University of Bolzano (Italy).

Alberto Sillitti has been involved in several EU funded projects related to Open Source Software, Service-Oriented Architectures, Agile Methods, Cyber-Physical Systems, and Mobile and Embedded Systems in which he applies non-invasive measurement approaches. He has served as member of the program committee of several international conferences and as program chair of the International Conference on Open Source Systems (OSS 2007) and International Conference on eXtreme Programming and Agile Processes in Software Engineering (XP 2010 and XP 2011). He is one of the founders of the International Conference in Software Engineering for Defense Applications (SEDA) for which served as program chair in 2012, 2013, and 2014. He has been the director of the International CASE Summer School on Practical Experimentation in Software Engineering from 2011 to 2014.

Alberto Sillitti serves in a few scientific associations: vice-chairman of the IFIP Working Group 2.13 on Open Source Systems for which he served as chairman from 2012 to 2015; founding member of the Italian Association for Software Engineering (founded in 2013); founding member of the Defense & Security Software Engineers Association (funded in 2015) where he serves as vice-chairman of the Research and Innovation Working Group; member of the board of the International Chapter of AICA (Italian Association for Computer Science and Automated Computation).

His research areas include open source development, agile methods, empirical software engineering, non-invasive measurement, software quality, cyber-physical systems, mobile and web services. In the last few years he has focused on mobile and energy-aware software development and quality for cyber-physical systems and Internet of Things. He is author of more than 150 papers published in international conferences and journals.

Abstracts

Designing Connected Products and Services for the Internet of Things

(joint course with Gerd Kortuem and Claire Rowland)

Gerd Kortuem, Prof. of Computing | Open University, United Kingdom

Claire Rowland, Independent UX consultant, UK

Connected products and services—such as networked thermostats, fitness monitors, home energy systems, and connected cars—are at the heart of the Internet of Things (IoT). The design of such IoT products and services raises new challenges which—despite a growing body of research on the Internet of Things—are still poorly understood.

This course is devoted to the exploration of how to design connected products and services, and how to create meaningful user experiences in a connected world. By using case studies of commercial products and research prototypes, this course will cover topics such as experience prototyping for the IoT, conceptual models for IoT products and services, usability challenges, design of data-driven products, and designing with IoT data.

This course is divided into two parts. Part 1 will cover theoretical aspects of designing connected products and services for the IoT. Part 2 will be devoted to practical exercises, which will provide participants the chance to apply learned concepts in practical design.

Networked Embedded Software

Luca Mottola and Mikhail Afanasov, Politecnico di Milano | SICS Swedish ICT

The vision of an “Internet of Things” is slowly materialising. Networked embedded sensors and actuators offer new ways of making use of existing assets and resources, backed by the availability of near real-time information from the environment and persons. These devices bridge the gap between the “machine” and the “world” around it: they dissolve the boundary between the digital domain and the physical world where the computing machine lives.

In this context, the course explores the design, implementation, and validation of the software powering networked embedded devices at the core of the Internet of Things. We will discuss the challenges in creating software artefacts that operate at the interface between the digital machine and the physical world, the state of the art in developing such a specific breed of software, and the issues in implementing complex functionality within limited resources. To complement the discussion, we will directly experiment with modern IoT programming platforms to gain initial hands-on experience, hopefully instrumental to foster the students’ creativity.

Sensing and Sense Making: Wearable, Ubiquitous Computing, and (Applied!) Machine Learning

Thomas Ploetz, Newcastle University, UK

Wearable and ubiquitous computing form one of the building blocks of the dawning age of the Internet of Things. Through massive and continuous miniaturisation of electronics it is now possible to integrate sensing and computing facilities into quite literally the  fabrics of everyday life. With the widespread adoption and integration of sensing and computing facilities comes the need for sophisticated sensor data analysis, which typically requires machine learning and pattern recognition methods.

In this course I will give an overview of the field of ubiquitous and wearable computing with specific focus on the Internet of Things, as well as on the basics of relevant sensing modalities. With this foundation the course will then specifically address sensor data analysis using machine learning techniques. I will provide a comprehensive introduction into relevant machine learning methods, most notably time series analysis procedures as they are being used for activity recognition applications. The course will conclude with practical consideration on how to evaluate sensor data analysis methods and what comes beyond activity recognition.

The practical part of the course will focus on projects based on the Microsoft Band 2 wearable sensing platform (paired with Android phones).

Dependable IoT Communications

Carlo Alberto Boano, Graz University of Technology

The Internet of Things will be the backbone of modern society and will embrace a system of wireless networks delivering end-users a plethora of attractive services and applications such as smart cities, smart grids, and smart healthcare. The latter heavily rely on the dependable operation of embedded wireless sensors and actuators, i.e., they expect a reliable data delivery within specific time boundaries as well as a high energy-efficiency. The environment in which wireless sensors and actuators are embedded, however, often negatively affects the performance of their wireless communications, making it hard to fulfill application-specific dependability requirements and sometimes compromising the functionality of the whole system.

In this context, the course illustrates state-of-the-art low-power wireless communication protocols and gives an overview of the influence of the environment on their performance. We will discuss the challenges in understanding and predicting the environmental impact, examples of environment-aware communication protocols, as well as the common issues in implementing complex functionalities on resource-constrained smart objects. The participants will also have the chance to gain hands-on experience and apply learned concepts through practical exercises.

Security of Smart Things

Atul Prakash, University of Michigan | Ann Arbor, USA

Learning Design of Systems for Smart Home Automation

Nilanjan Banerjee, University of Maryland | Baltimore County, USA

Smart Home Automation is an important paradigm in today’s sensor-driven world. Homes and buildings are being continuously instrumented with sensors like Kinect, energy meters, cameras, occupancy sensors, digital televisions, and smart switches. Home automation systems form an interesting confluence of sensors systems, operating systems, and cloud-driven data analytics. This hands on course will study the challenges in smart home automation systems from a hands-on and systems perspective. We will use an innovative and emerging platform, Lab of Things, from Microsoft Research to build software systems for smart home automation, including writing drivers and applications using Lab of Things. Knowledge of an object oriented language is a must. Knowledge of C# is a plus, however, there will be a review of C# at the start of the course.

Indoor Location

Dimitrios Lymberopoulos, Microsoft Research, USA

Location is a fundamental service for mobile devices and the exploding Internet-of-Things (IoT) space. The mobile and sensing research communities have made remarkable progress in location sensing in the recent years with contributions ranging from low-power outdoor location sensing, all the way to an explosion of indoor location technologies aiming to recreate the outdoor GPS experience indoors.

This talk will provide an in-depth presentation of the principles and practices of location sensing in mobile devices. The goal is to give students and researchers a broad sense of the state of the art, and to help them get hands on experience with some of the most accurate location technologies today.

From smart homes to smart cities: how secure is smart world around us?

Denis Makrushin, Kaspersky Lab | Moscow, Russia

Have you ever thought about how secure the emerging ‘smart’ world around us is?

Scare stories surrounding the Internet of Things (IoT) conjure up images of bad guys in hoodies who live for hacking and making the lives of folks harder – inventing millions of ways to infiltrate your life through your gadgets. Probably no one cares about their smart-home security, but what about smart-city threats? A huge number of public IoT devices affecting millions of people are vulnerable to abuse, potentially endangering users’ data and the networks of the companies they work for, or both.

The talk will be devoted to global security issues with regard to the growing Internet of Things, and how they might influence our lives.