Abstract

Findings from home interviews with older adults who consider themselves to be ‘recording their memories for posterity’ are presented. Two practices are highlighted: the archiving and preservation of family content, and the creation of new artefacts as a way of recording one’s memories. Themes that are highlighted include recipient design when recording stories, memory as an authentic resource for the past, and the frustration of wishing to pass on one’s stories but feeling that there is a lack of opportunity to do so. It is suggested that the findings could provide an interesting contrast to studies of newer technologies for reminiscing, and reminiscing practices by younger cohorts.