MSR Symposium on Computational Photography: “Creating, Editing, and Viewing Very BIG Images” and “Image-guided optimization for interactive image manipulation”

Date

July 18, 2007

Speaker

Michael Cohen, Matt Uyttendaele, Johannes Kopf, and Dani Lischinski

Affiliation

Microsoft Research

Overview

Creating, Editing, and Viewing Very BIG Images; Michael Cohen, Matt Uyttendaele, Johannes Kopf – Microsoft Research: Very high resolution “gigapixel” images offer a variety of new viewing and interaction paradigms including deep pan and zoom as well as dynamically modifying the exposure gain and bias during viewing. Viewing, creating and editing such images present a number of challenges. We will describe how we have overcome these and demonstrate an online viewing system called HD View. See http://www.research.microsoft.com/ivm/HDView.htm.
Image-guided optimization for interactive image manipulation; Dani Lischinski – Microsoft Research: A number of interactive image and video manipulation tasks may be carried out effectively through the use of an image-guided optimization framework. These tasks include colorization of grayscale images and video, selective recoloring, local manipulation of various tonal values, and natural image matting. In all of these interactive tasks the user’s intent is expressed as a set of sparse soft constraints, and an image-guided penalty functional is minimized subject to these constraints. The penalty functional is quadratic in its variables, and thus has a unique minimum that may be obtained by solving a sparse linear system.

Speakers

Michael Cohen, Matt Uyttendaele, Johannes Kopf, and Dani Lischinski

Michael Cohen is a Principal Researcher in the Interactive Visual Media (IVM) group at MSR. He arrived at MSR 13 years ago from the faculty at Princeton University.

Matt Uyttendaele is a Principal RSDE in the IVM group of MSR. His work on Image Based Modeling and Rendering of images and video is well known.

Johannes Kopf is a summer intern at MSR. He has 3 first authored SIGGRAPH papers to be presented this year including two resulting from the work we will describe.

Dani Lischinski is an associate professor at the School of Computer Science and Engineering at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, where he runs the Computer Graphics Lab. He received his PhD from the Department of Computer Science and the Program of Computer Graphics at Cornell University in 1994. His areas of interest span a wide variety of topics in the fields of computer graphics, visualization, virtual reality, and image and video processing. In particular, I have worked on algorithms for photorealistic image synthesis, simulation of global illumination, robust triangulation and mesh generation, interactive visualization of complex virtual scenes, computer-generated illustration, facial animation, image-based modeling and rendering, texture synthesis, video compression, medical visualization, tone mapping, and physically-based animation.

People