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Exam 70-480

Programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3

$150.00 USD*

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Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 logo
  • Published: August 20, 2012
  • Languages: English, Chinese (Simplified), French, German, Japanese, Portuguese (Brazil)
  • Audiences: Developers
  • Technology: Microsoft Visual Studio 2012
  • Credit toward certification: MCP, MCSD

Convince your boss email

Copy the following content into an email message to your boss and update [the bracketed text] with the appropriate content.

Dear [your boss's name]:

I'd like to expand and prove my technical skills by earning a Microsoft Certification. My next step is taking Exam 70-480. The registration fee is $150.00 USD.

When I pass this certification, you'll have proof of my ability to work with Microsoft Visual Studio 2012. Microsoft has training and online resources to help me prepare for the exam. I believe I'll be more effective and productive after achieving this valuable technical certification.

Let me know if you have any questions. In the meantime, you can find out more about this exam at https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/exam-70-480.aspx. As you can see, the exam validates skills that are crucial to our team's success.

Thank you for your support,

[your name]

Skills measured

This exam measures your ability to accomplish the technical tasks listed below. The percentages indicate the relative weight of each major topic area on the exam. The higher the percentage, the more questions you are likely to see on that content area on the exam.

Please note that the questions may test on, but will not be limited to, the topics described in the bulleted text.

  • Create the document structure

    • Structure the UI by using semantic markup, including for search engines and screen readers (Section, Article, Nav, Header, Footer, and Aside); create a layout container in HTML

  • Write code that interacts with UI controls

    • Programmatically add and modify HTML elements; implement media controls; implement HTML5 canvas and SVG graphics

  • Apply styling to HTML elements programmatically

    • Change the location of an element; apply a transform; show and hide elements

  • Implement HTML5 APIs

    • Implement storage APIs, AppCache API, and Geolocation API

  • Establish the scope of objects and variables

    • Define the lifetime of variables; keep objects out of the global namespace; use the “this” keyword to reference an object that fired an event; scope variables locally and globally

  • Create and implement objects and methods

    • Implement native objects; create custom objects and custom properties for native objects using prototypes and functions; inherit from an object; implement native methods and create custom methods

  • Implement program flow

    • Iterate across collections and array items; manage program decisions by using switch statements, if/then, and operators; evaluate expressions

  • Raise and handle an event

    • Handle common events exposed by DOM (OnBlur, OnFocus, OnClick); declare and handle bubbled events; handle an event by using an anonymous function

  • Implement exception handling

    • Set and respond to error codes; throw an exception; request for null checks; implement try-catch-finally blocks

  • Implement a callback

    • Receive messages from the HTML5 WebSocket API; use jQuery to make an AJAX call; wire up an event; implement a callback by using anonymous functions; handle the “this” pointer

  • Create a web worker process

    • Start and stop a web worker; pass data to a web worker; configure timeouts and intervals on the web worker; register an event listener for the web worker; limitations of a web worker

  • Validate user input by using HTML5 elements

    • Choose the appropriate controls based on requirements; implement HTML input types and content attributes (for example, required) to collect user input

  • Validate user input by using JavaScript

    • Evaluate a regular expression to validate the input format; validate that you are getting the right kind of data type by using built-in functions; prevent code injection

  • Consume data

    • Consume JSON and XML data; retrieve data by using web services; load data or get data from other sources by using XMLHTTPRequest

  • Serialize, deserialize, and transmit data

    • Binary data; text data (JSON, XML); implement the jQuery serialize method; Form.Submit; parse data; send data by using XMLHTTPRequest; sanitize input by using URI/form encoding

  • Style HTML text properties

    • Apply styles to text appearance (color, bold, italics); apply styles to text font (WOFF and @font-face, size); apply styles to text alignment, spacing, and indentation; apply styles to text hyphenation; apply styles for a text drop shadow

  • Style HTML box properties

    • Apply styles to alter appearance attributes (size, border and rounding border corners, outline, padding, margin); apply styles to alter graphic effects (transparency, opacity, background image, gradients, shadow, clipping); apply styles to establish and change an element’s position (static, relative, absolute, fixed)

  • Create a flexible content layout

    • Implement a layout using a flexible box model; implement a layout using multi-column; implement a layout using position floating and exclusions; implement a layout using grid alignment; implement a layout using regions, grouping, and nesting

  • Create an animated and adaptive UI

    • Animate objects by applying CSS transitions; apply 3-D and 2-D transformations; adjust UI based on media queries (device adaptations for output formats, displays, and representations); hide or disable controls

  • Find elements by using CSS selectors and jQuery

    • Choose the correct selector to reference an element; define element, style, and attribute selectors; find elements by using pseudo-elements and pseudo-classes (for example, :before, :first-line, :first-letter, :target, :lang, :checked, :first-child)

  • Structure a CSS file by using CSS selectors

    • Reference elements correctly; implement inheritance; override inheritance by using !important; style an element based on pseudo-elements and pseudo-classes (for example, :before, :first-line, :first-letter, :target, :lang, :checked, :first-child)

Preparation options

Find a Microsoft Learning Partner near you

Microsoft Certification PREP Talk: Exam 480

In this episode of Prep tips from certification experts, James Seymour, Certification Planner, and Jeremy Foster, Developer Evangelist, discuss the relevancy of the skills being measured on Exam 480.

  • This course provides an accelerated introduction to HTML5, CSS3, and JavaScript and helps students learn basic HTML5/CSS3/JavaScript programming skills. It focuses on using HTML5/CSS3/JavaScript to implement programming logic, define and use variables, perform looping and branching, develop user interfaces, capture and validate user input, store data, and create well-structured applications. This course uses Visual Studio 2012, running on Windows 8.

    The course is intended for developers who have at least six months of professional experience and who are interested in developing applications using HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3 (either Windows Store apps or IE10 apps for the Web). While the students may have little or no HTML5 coding experience, they should have some experience with HTML4.

Buy a practice test for Exam 70-480 from:

  • avatar image

    Free ebook: Programming Windows Store Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, Second Edition

    Posted by Veronica Sopher - Microsoft on 08 Apr 2014 at 15:53 GMT

    From Microsoft Press

     We’re pleased to announce our free (1311-page) ebook: Programming Windows Store Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, Second Edition, by Kraig Brockschmidt.

    Kraig began updating the first edition exactly a year ago, and when you examine the new ebook’s Table of Contents you’ll quickly see how much work he has done to share his deep understanding of Windows Store app building. Even in the simplest sense—new pages added to this edition: 478—Kraig’s effort and generosity are impressive. Thank you, Kraig, and enjoy, app builders!

    Download the PDF, the Mobi, the ePub, as well as the companion content.

    The following excerpt from Kraig’s introduction to the ebook shares our goals for the title:

    Introduction

    Work on this second edition began almost as soon as the first edition was released. (I’d make a quip about the ink not being dry, but that analogy doesn’t work for an ebook!) When Windows 8 became generally available in the fall of 2012, work on Windows 8.1 was already well underway: the engineering team had a long list of improvements they wanted to make along with features that they weren’t able to complete for Windows 8. And in the very short span of one year, Windows 8.1 was itself ready to ship.

    At first I thought writing this second edition would be primarily a matter of making small updates to each chapter and perhaps adding some pages here and there on a handful of new features. But as I got deeper into the updated platform, I was amazed at just how much the API surface area had expanded! Windows 8.1 introduces a number of additional controls, an HTML webview element, a stronger HTTP API, content indexing, deeper OneDrive support, better media capabilities, more tiles sizes (small and large), more flexible secondary tile, access to many kinds of peripheral devices, and more options for working with the Windows Store, like consumable in-app purchases. And clearly, this is a very short list of distinct Windows 8.1 features that doesn’t include the many smaller changes to the API. (A fuller list can be found on Windows 8.1: New APIs and features for developers.)

    Furthermore, even as I was wrapping up the first edition of this book, I already had a long list of topics I wanted to explore in more depth. I wrote a number of those pieces for my blog, with the intention of including them in this second edition. A prime example is Appendix A, “Demystifying Promises.”

    All in all, then, what was already a very comprehensive book in the first edition has become even more so in the second! Fortunately, with this being an ebook, neither you nor I need feel guilty about matters of deforestation. We can simply enjoy the process of learning about and writing Windows Store Apps with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.

    And what about Windows Phone 8.1? I’m glad you asked, because much of this book is completely applicable to that platform. Yes, that’s right: Windows Phone 8.1 supports writing apps in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, just like Windows 8.1, meaning that you have the same flexibility of implementation languages on both. However, the decision to support JavaScript apps on Windows Phone 8.1 came very late in the production of this book, so I’m only able to make a few notes here and there for Phone - specific concerns. I encourage you to follow the Building Apps for Windows blog, where we’ll be posting more about the increasingly unified experience of Windows and Windows Phone.

    Who should read this book?

    This book is about writing Windows Store apps using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. Our primary focus will be on applying these web technologies within the Windows platform, where there are unique considerations, and not on exploring the details of those web technologies themselves. For the most part, I'm assuming that you're already at least somewhat conversant with these standards. We will cover some of the more salient areas like the CSS grid, which is central to app layout, but otherwise I trust that you're capable of finding appropriate references for most everything else. For Java Script specifically, I can recommend Rey Bango’s Required JavaScript Reading list, though I hope you’ll spend more time reading this book than others!

    I'm also assuming that your interest in Windows has at least two basic motivations. One, you probably want to come up to speed as quickly as you can, perhaps to carve out a foothold in the Windows Store sooner rather than later. Toward that end, Chapter 2, “Quickstart,” gives you an immediate experience with the tools, APIs, and some core aspects of app development and the platform. On the other hand, you probably also want to make the best app you can, one that performs really well and that takes advantage of the full extent of the platform. Toward this end, I've also endeavored to make this book comprehensive, helping you at least be aware of what's possible and where optimizations can be made.

    Let me make it clear, though, that my focus in this book is the Windows platform. I won’t talk much about third-party libraries, architectural considerations for app design, and development strategies and best practices. Some of these will come up from time to time, but mostly in passing.

    Nevertheless, many insights have come from working directly with real-world developers on their real-world apps. As part of the Windows Ecosystem team, myself and my teammates have been on the front lines bringing those first apps to the Windows Store. This has involved writing bits of code for those apps and investigating bugs, along with conducting design, code, and performance reviews with members of the Windows engineering team. As such, one of my goals with this book is to make that deep understanding available to many more developers, including you!

See more posts on Born to Learn

Cover of 'Exam Ref 70-480: Programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3'

Exam Ref 70-480: Programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3

Published: August 15, 2014

Prepare for Exam 70-480—and help demonstrate your real-world mastery of programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3. Designed for experienced programmers ready to advance their status, Exam Ref focuses on the critical thinking and decision-making acumen needed for success at the MCSD level.

Buy this book at the Microsoft Press Store

Cover of 'Training Guide: Programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3'

Training Guide: Programming in HTML5 with JavaScript and CSS3

Published: March 15, 2013

Designed to help experienced programmers develop real-world, job-role-specific skills, this Training Guide focuses on creating applications with HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS3. Build hands-on expertise through a series of lessons, exercises, and suggested practices—and help maximize your performance on the job.

Buy this book at the Microsoft Press Store

Who should take this exam?

Candidates for this exam should have one or more years of experience programming the essential business/application logic for a variety of application types and hardware/software platforms using JavaScript. Candidates should also have a minimum of one to two years of experience developing with HTML in an object-oriented, event-driven programming model.

More information about exams

We recommend that you review this exam preparation guide in its entirety and familiarize yourself with the resources on this website before you schedule your exam. See the Microsoft Certification exam overview for information about registration, videos of typical exam question formats, and other preparation resources. For information on exam policies and scoring, see the Microsoft Certification exam policies and FAQs.

This preparation guide is subject to change at any time without prior notice and at the sole discretion of Microsoft. Microsoft exams might include adaptive testing technology and simulation items. Microsoft does not identify the format in which exams are presented. Please use this preparation guide to prepare for the exam, regardless of its format. To help you prepare for this exam, Microsoft recommends that you have hands-on experience with the product and that you use the specified training resources. These training resources do not necessarily cover all of the topics listed in the "Skills measured" section.