Training
Certifications
Books
Special Offers
Community




 
Troubleshooting Microsoft® Project 2002
Author Bonnie Biafore
Pages 512
Disk N/A
Level Beg/Int
Published 06/12/2002
ISBN 9780735615038
ISBN-10 0-7356-1503-9
Price(USD) $34.99
To see this book's discounted price, select a reseller below.
 

More Information

About the Book
Table of Contents
Sample Chapter
Index
Related Series
Related Books
About the Author

Support: Book & CD

Rate this book
Barnes Noble Amazon Quantum Books

 


Chapter: Creating tasks continued


I can't find a Hammock task type

Source of the problem

Hammock tasks are so named because the hammock task's duration hangs like a hammock from dates outside the task. Dates in other tasks determine hammock task start and finish dates. Hammock tasks are perfect for activities that take place continuously from one point in a project to another, such as supervising a crew throughout a construction job. If the job starts later and finishes earlier, supervision still starts when the job starts, and finishes when the job finishes. Its duration changes with the duration of the job.

The problem is that Project doesn't offer a Hammock task type. Regular task relationships only define a relationship at one end of a task, such as Finish to Start or Start to Start. A hammock task has a relationship at both ends. If you try to use a regular task for a hammock task, you can define the relationship at the start but you need a date constraint to create the relationship at the finish. Even then, the date constraint doesn't change as the project schedule changes, so you could spend your days changing date constraints in Project to reflect these ongoing activities. Fortunately, you can create a task that acts like a hammock by linking dates from other tasks to the start and finish dates of the hammock task.

How to fix it

To build a hammock task between two other tasks, follow these steps:

  1. Click in a row in the Gantt chart where you want to create the hammock task.
  2. Click Insert Task on the Insert menu.
  3. In the Task Name cell of the Gantt chart, type the name for the task.
  4. Click the cell in the Gantt chart that contains the date that controls the start of the hammock task. This date can be the Start date or the Finish date of a task. In the figure, this date is the Start date for the Move And Cover Furniture task.
  5. On the Edit menu, click Copy Cell.
  6. Click the Start date cell for the hammock task.
  7. On the Edit menu, click Paste Special.
  8. In the Paste Special dialog box, click the Paste Link option, and then click OK to link the start date of the hammock task to the start date of the controlling task.
  9. Click to view graphic
    Click to view graphic

  10. Click the cell in the Gantt chart that contains the date that controls the finish of the hammock task. This date can be the Start date or the Finish date of a task. In the figure, this date is the Finish date for the Clean Up task.
  11. On the Edit menu, click Copy Cell.
  12. Click the Finish date cell for the hammock task.
  13. On the Edit menu, click Paste Special.
  14. In the Paste Special dialog box, click the Paste Link option, and then click OK to link the finish date of the hammock task to the finish date of the controlling task.

Hammock tasks can be fussy

The linked dates in a hammock task can cause problems, or at least unexpected behavior, under certain circumstances. Keep an eye out for the following problems:

  • The Paste Linked dates in the hammock task control the start and finish of the task. Specifying a predecessor to the Hammock task has no effect on the hammock.
  • When a hammock task is subordinate to a summary task that has predecessors, the summary task might change the start date from the paste-linked date for the hammock task.
  • If you paste-link dates that make the hammock start date later than the hammock finish date, Project might change the start or finish date, miscalculate the hammock duration, or change the hammock into a milestone.


Previous   |  Table of Contents   |   Next



Last Updated: June 3, 2002
Top of Page