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How do digital youth of the “app generation” learn, communicate, and express themselves

Read more How do digital youth of the “app generation” learn, communicate, and express themselves

Do you know what your children are doing online?

Read more Do you know what your children are doing online?

Online Safety—At Work and at Home

The idea of sharing our work experiences with our kids gained a lot of momentum when the Take our Daughters and Sons to Work Foundation was launched 20 years ago. This group's annual event provides an opportunity for millions of children to learn about what their parent, guardian, or mentor may do, see where they work, and discover possibilities about their future

For me, this event was a good reminder that Online Safety isn’t just about families. The strategies for protecting your home PC and your children are not all that different from protecting your employees and your business or workplace.

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Read more Online Safety—At Work and at Home

1,000,000 Facebook fans for Microsoft Safer Online

Read more 1,000,000 Facebook fans for Microsoft Safer Online

Social Circles to Social Outcasts: Mobile Manners & Madness

From loud talkers, to people who answer their cell phone while you’re in mid-sentence, there are a number of mobile phone pet peeves that are getting under people’s skin. Microsoft’s Safer Online Facebook poll asked our social media fans; What do they find most annoying about the way people use their mobile phone? Have their ever…and, who is safer? 
Here’s what they told us; 

Their “Top Five” most selected pet peeves include:
• Constant phone checking (44 percent of the respondents included this in their top five)
• Loud talkers (41 percent)
• Using or not silencing the phone when appropriate, for instance in social settings (40 percent)
• Using the phone during face-to-face conversations (39 percent)
• Delaying traffic (35 percent)

Have they ever…oh yes they did!  Respondents shared with us, a number of entertaining stories; like pocket dialing while singing along to the radio.  This may be simply irritating to some, but it’s a great example of how you may be doing more than just annoying your social circles, or becoming a social outcast. In fact, you could be putting your personal information at risk. 

Our Microsoft Safer Online poll found that:
• Nearly half of respondents (47percent) said they have lost their mobile phone,
• Exactly half (50 percent) said they have pocket dialed someone, and
• More than half (58 percent) have shared their location

Read more Social Circles to Social Outcasts: Mobile Manners & Madness

Men or women – Who is better when it comes to their mobile manners?

Chances are you have your mobile phone with you right now. These devices allow us to keep pace with the demands of our busy digital lifestyles. They also allow us to tell everyone, everything, all the time. There are multiple opinions on the breakdown of social etiquette due to oversharing information, but there’s no denying that certain mobile phone behaviors are not only annoying, they may even be risky.

Whether it’s loud talkers or not silencing a phone during a movie, some mobile manners like pocket dialing someone because your phone isn’t locked, or tagging photos without permission, may put personal information at risk. But who is better at protecting their personal information? Men, or women?

At Microsoft, we want to know what you think. That’s why we’re kicking off our Mobile Manners and Mayhem Facebook poll. Rank your biggest mobile phone pet peeves and tell us your own mobile mayhem story. On May 20, we’ll release the results and reveal who is better at protecting themselves online, men or women.

At a very young age, we are taught to share.  Share our toys, our thoughts, our gratitude.  But in today’s digital society, all this oversharing online, may put us in harm’s way. Your personal information is a valuable commodity to criminals and, just like your personal computer, your mobile phone is equally attractive to those who would misuse this information.

Read more Men or women – Who is better when it comes to their mobile manners?

Jeannette Wing: The Woman Asking All The Right Questions

What do computer science and social issues have in common?  A lot more than might you think.  For starters, computer science is being used to help solve some of the toughest issues that we’re facing around the world.

“Advances in computer science can be potentially transformative in sectors that make up the fabric of society: health care, transportation, energy, agriculture, and education,” says Dr. Jeanette Wing, Microsoft vice president and head of Microsoft Research International. 

 

Within the computer science community, Dr. Wing is well-known for her advocacy of  “computational thinking,” an approach to problem solving, designing systems and understanding human behavior that draws upon concepts fundamental to computer science.  It’s about asking the right questions combined with the important skills that most subjects help develop, like creativity, ability to explain and team work.  Dr. Wing sees it as a “universally applicable attitude and skill set that everyone, not just computer scientists, should be eager to learn and use.”

In her three-page article in the Communications of the ACM entitled Five Deep Questions in Computing she asks thought provoking questions to the computer-science community in order to start a specific dialogue around problem solving using key science drivers.

- Is there a complexity theory for analyzing our real-world computing systems
as there is for the algorithms we invent?

Read more Jeannette Wing: The Woman Asking All The Right Questions

New Microsoft app helps you become more scam savvy in the New Year

Read more New Microsoft app helps you become more scam savvy in the New Year

“Bing it On” and Search Yourself

No matter which search engine someone prefers, a key piece of advice from safety advocates to help protect your online reputation, is to conduct an Internetsearch on yourself, using several search engines.  And then, evaluate whether your online life mirrors the reputation you want others to see.

Recently, the Bing team launched an Internet search tool that lets you conduct a side-by-side search engine comparison with Google.  Now, while I think it’s cool, I thought; what if people used this double search feature for good – their own good.  What a great time to use one tool, to help manage your online reputation: Search for yourself, and check out what’s being said about you.  According to a recent study*, 37 percent of adults never do this. 

Read more “Bing it On” and Search Yourself

Online Safety and Security: Sharing the Knowledge

Computer security and online safety is a 24/7 hour affair. Business leaders at work are frequently family leaders at home and – particularly for security issues – are interested in online safety for their family.

This week, the Family Online Safety Institute launched a groundbreaking new tool called the Platform for Good (PfG).  With the backing of some of the top industry leaders including Facebook, Google and Microsoft, along with the backing of the MacArthur Foundation, PfG is designed to promote and encourage good online behavior, also known as digital citizenship.

How?  PfG will help connect parents, educators, and youth by bringing attention to the many positive ways families and schools use technology through interactive features.  It will also provide resources to help bridge the generational divide in the digital world.

Read more Online Safety and Security: Sharing the Knowledge