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Promote Digital Civility this Safer Internet Day

Welcome to Safer Internet Day 2017, an international day of action to promote safer, more responsible use of technology and services, particularly among children and young people. Microsoft has been involved in Safer Internet Day each year since it started in 2004. This year, under the Safer Internet Day theme of, “Be the change: Unite for a better internet,” Microsoft is launching its Digital Civility Challenge.

We challenge teens, young people and adults who are online around the world to live by four, positive tenets. Commit daily and share on social media how you’re doing. Use the hash tags #challenge4civility and #Im4digitalcivility.

Digital Civility Challenge

I embrace the challenge to be a leader in making the internet a better and safer place. I commit to do my part every day by living up to the four Digital Civility Challenge ideals:

1

Live the Golden Rule.

I will act with empathy, compassion and kindness in every interaction, and treat everyone I connect with online with dignity and respect.

2

Respect differences.

I will appreciate cultural differences and honor diverse perspectives. When I disagree, I will engage thoughtfully and avoid name calling and personal attacks.

3

Pause before replying.

I will pause and think before responding to things I disagree with. I will not post or send anything that could hurt someone else, damage my reputation, or threaten my safety or the safety of others.

4

Stand up for myself and others.

I will tell someone if I feel unsafe, offer support to those who are targets of online abuse or cruelty, report activity that threatens anyone’s safety, and preserve evidence of inappropriate or unsafe behavior.

As a leader in the effort to make the internet a better place, I will share my experiences on social media using #challenge4civility or #Im4digitalcivility and encourage others to join the Digital Civility Challenge.

Other "To Do's" for Safer Internet Day

In addition to taking the challenge and telling us how you’re doing on social media, we’re offering other ways to learn and get involved this Safer Internet Day.

Digital Civility Index - For instance, check out our new Digital Civility Index and Research that we conducted in 14 countries: Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, France, Germany, India, Mexico, Russia, South Africa, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. We surveyed teens and adults in each of these countries, and some of the results may surprise you.

Best Practices - Along with the new index, we’re also sharing suggested Best Practices for digital civility. Our hope is that policymakers, companies and organizations will consider our suggestions and build on our initial efforts through fresh digital civility-related projects and programs.

Voices for Digital Civility - And, check out our Voices for Digital Civility with comments from leading advocacy organizations and groups in favor of spreading the word about digital civility.

Council for Digital Good - Also, you may have heard: last month we began accepting applications for our new Council for Digital Good in the U.S. We’re looking for between 12 and 15 teens ages 13 to 17 who live in the U.S. and are interested in exploring concepts like Digital Civility and other online safety issues. Those accepted will receive an paid trip to Redmond, WA, for a two-day summit on the Microsoft campus in early August. If you’re interested or know of someone who might be, fill out this application.

Twitter & Facebook - Whatever you plan to do and however you plan to get involved this Safer Internet Day, be sure to share it! You can find us @Safer_Online on Twitter and at www.facebook.com/saferonline/. Happy Safer Internet Day 2017!

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