Restricted Substances

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Microsoft has created several environmental compliance specifications to inform suppliers of restricted substance requirement, which are set by law and Microsoft policy, and to establish documentation controls for achieving such requirements, as follows:

  • Microsoft Restricted Substances for Hardware Products Specification (H00594) This document provides details about which substances are not allowed in our products, packaging and supplier manufacturing operations. Microsoft restricted substances are identified based on a scientific approach and the precautionary principle. Where we have reasonable grounds for concern over a chemical’s potential for severe or irreversible damage to health or the environment, we believe actions should be taken to gather and assess additional data. Such investigations may lead to voluntary restrictions beyond legal requirements.
  • Restricted Substances Control System for Hardware Products (H00642) - This document contains the required documentation suppliers must provide to demonstrate their adherence to H00594. All suppliers are required to provide full material declarations and other documentation to ensure parts and products supplied to Microsoft meet the requirements of H00594. Having full material declarations allows us to respond swiftly if new concerns arise about any substance, or if the regulatory landscape expands beyond the current Microsoft substance restrictions in H00594.

These specifications work together to ensure all parts, components, products, and packaging supplied to Microsoft meet global and Microsoft-specific restricted substance requirements. We use an independent laboratory to complete testing for certain restricted substances in all our hardware products. We use test results to validate supplier material declarations and monitor compliance throughout the product life cycle.

 

Learn more on our Materials and Substances page.

All Microsoft hardware products comply with the applicable restricted substance requirements of the European Union’s Restriction of the use of certain Hazardous Substances in Electrical and Electronic Equipment (RoHS) Directive (2002/95/EC) as amended by the EU RoHS Recast Directive (2011/65/EU). The EU RoHS Recast requires self-declaration to RoHS restrictions through the Declaration of Conformity (DoC) process and CE marking.

 

Delegated Directive 2015/863 (“RoHS3) is an amendment to Directive 2011/65/EU and not a Directive under ROHS. Therefore, the Declaration of Conformity will continue to reference the governing Directive,  2011/65/EU, and not the amendment specifically as it only pertains to the addition of the four substances. The Overall Directive 2011/65/EU includes the existing substances and the amendment, and our compliance letter clearly documents that our products comply with Directive 2011/65/EU, which includes the additional substances as amended by Directive 2015/863.

 

Download our REACH Article 33 disclosure on environmental compliance for our products.

The European Union’s Regulation on the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) (2006/1907/EC) entered into force on June 1, 2007. Pursuant to Article 33, Microsoft communicates information regarding Substances of Very High Concern (SVHC) that are contained in articles in a concentration above 0.1% by weight at the link provided. Microsoft actively monitors the European Chemical Agency’s SVHC candidate list on an ongoing basis and restricts SVHCs that have been added to the ECHA authorization list through the H00594 specification.

 

Download our REACH Article 33 Disclosure on Environmental Compliance

Yes, we do. Please click on the link below to access the Declaration of Conformity (DoC) documents, also known as CE Certification, SoC (Statement of Conformity), or RoHS Compliance Form.

 

Download a Declaration of Conformity for a Microsoft product.

Electronic devices do not have Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS). We do have a Lithium Battery Transportation Document which contains the Product Data Sheet for all products containing lithium ion batteries.

Download our Product Data Sheet for more information.

For these two countries only, please contact emmu@microsoft.com.

Sustainability

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Yes, our devices are registered to EPEAT. The Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) is managed by the Green Electronics Council (GEC). EPEAT registered products must meet environmental performance criteria covering the complete product lifecycle from design to recycling.

 

See the EPEAT webpage.

Yes, our devices are registered to EPEAT.

 

See the EPEAT webpage.

For those devices where eco profiles are available, they can be downloaded from Microsoft.com website.

 

Download our EcoProfiles.

Recycling

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We partner with recycling organizations, join forces with collection schemes, and work with Microsoft stores and our supply chain partners to facilitate the return and end-of-life management process of devices, batteries, and packaging. If you need specific details as to where to recycle these items in your region, please go to the link and select your specific location.

 

Learn more on our End-of-life Management and Recycling page

Packaging

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Microsoft is committed to the continual improvement of environmentally sound packaging by signing the Australia Packaging Covenant (APCO) on March 25, 2009. We continued our commitment to the updated Australia Packaging Covenant (APCO) by signing and submitting the APCO Declaration form in August 2010. Microsoft has since expanded the APCO) to all global packaging programs.

 

Learn more in our Devices Sustainability at Microsoft report

 

See our APCO report and action plan

Microsoft designs its hardware and software packaging to meet global environmental requirements. Microsoft suppliers are required to comply with applicable laws and regulations, including compliance with the European Union’s Directive on Packaging and Packaging Waste (1994/62/EC), as amended by 2018/852/EU and CEN packaging standards (EN 13427:2005) as well as US Toxics in Packaging legislation.  Packaging for Microsoft products meets heavy metal restrictions, labelling, and essential requirements regarding packaging optimization, manufacturing, composition, recovery and reuse.  Microsoft’s commitment to the continual improvement of environmentally sound packaging was initiated when Microsoft signed the Australia Packaging Covenant (APC) on March 25, 2009 and reinforced when Microsoft signed the APC Declaration form in August 2010. Microsoft has since expanded the APC to all global packaging programs.

 

Learn more on our Packaging page

Battery

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The battery transport information is available in the Product Data Sheet for our lithium ion and lithium ion polymer batteries.

 

Download our Lithium Ion Transportation Document.

The battery specifications are available in the Product Data Sheet for our lithium ion and lithium ion polymer batteries.

 

Download our Lithium Ion Transportation Document.

Energy

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Microsoft devices comply with the EU Ecodesign Directive for Energy Related Products (2009/125/EC), and its implementing regulations when applicable. Microsoft products also comply with EU Commission Regulation for Standby and Off Mode Power Consumption for Electronic Household and Office Equipment (1275/2008) and US Department of Energy and US state energy conservation standards when applicable. Products that are equipped with external power supplies meet international efficiency requirements. Microsoft is a signatory to the EU’s Game Console Voluntary Agreement. This voluntary agreement commits Microsoft to strive constantly for improved game console energy efficiency.

 

Learn more on our Energy Efficiency page.

Many of our devices have been certified to ENERGY STAR.

 

See the ENERGY STAR webpage

Copyright Levy Fees

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A Copyright Levy Fee is a legally authorized fee added to the price of hardware capable of recording copyrighted media in many countries within the European Economic Area (EEA). The Copyright Levy Fee must be collected upon the first sale or distribution of the device and remitted to an appropriate in-country copyright collection society. The Copyright Levy Fee is used to compensate copyright holders for the private copying of their copyrighted materials, including music, movies and books.

No. Copyright Levy Fees are not new fees. Microsoft has been collecting and paying Copyright Levy Fees in countries with laws requiring fee collection and payment for many years. What is new? Microsoft is refining its execution of Copyright Levy Fee management to align with legal requirements and sharing this FAQ for partner planning and information purposes.

The formulas for calculating Copyright Levy Fees vary by country and by specific hardware device.

No. Copyright Levy Fees are intended to compensate copyright holders for the private copying of their copyrighted works. Copyright Levy Fee laws authorize the collection fees on hardware products and/or media capable of the private copying and storing of copyrighted works. Blank storage media, USB sticks, computers, and tablets are commonly covered by Copyright Levy Fees. For Microsoft, our Surface line of computer devices is primarily impacted. You are advised to check with your legal counsel to determine product scope coverage in countries where you operate.

Most European countries have enacted copyright levy laws requiring distributors, retailers, and resellers to collect, report, and remit Copyright Levy Fees to copyright collection societies. These collection societies use the collected fees to compensate copyright holders for the private copying of their copyrighted works. If you are a distributor, retailer, or reseller of covered devices, you may have legal obligations to collect, report, and remit Copyright Levy Fees on covered hardware products and/or media.

European Union (EU) Directive 2001/29/EC provides EU Member States with the authority to enact laws to compensate right holders for the private copying of their copyrighted works. Most EU Member States have enacted country-specific legislation to establish a Copyright Levy Fee payment scheme to compensate rights holders. No uniform Copyright Levy Fee law applies consistently across EU Member States. A few non-EU countries within the European Economic Area have also enacted legislation. Regarding liability, most laws impose primary liability on the entity that places the covered devices on the local market for distribution or sale; however, you are advised to check with your legal counsel to determine your legal obligations.

No. The payment of a Copyright Levy Fee is not voluntary. Payment is a mandatory requirement established by law. You are advised to check with your legal counsel to determine if you have legal obligations under local law.

Effective July 2019, Microsoft and its distribution and retail partners will independently collect, report, and remit Copyright Levy Fees based on local copyright levy laws. Distributors and retailers may be the primary obligated entities that will need to comply with in-country copyright levy laws for the distribution and sale of covered Microsoft devices. In such cases, Microsoft partners will need to collect, report, and remit applicable Copyright Levy Fees directly to the local collecting society. Microsoft will collect, report, and remit Copyright Levy Fees only where it has primary legal obligations under local copyright levy laws. You are advised to check with your legal counsel to determine your legal obligations.

Effective August 2019, Microsoft will collect, report, and remit Copyright Levy Fees only where it has primary legal obligations under local copyright levy laws. Microsoft will continue to collect, report, and remit such fees on behalf of distributors and retailers only in countries where Microsoft has primary copyright levy fee obligations, such as when distributors or retailers purchase covered devices from in-country Microsoft subsidiaries. In all other cases, Microsoft’s distributors, retailers, orother channel partners will need to collect, report, and remit applicable Copyright Levy Fees if obligated by local copyright levy laws. You are advised to check with your legal counsel to determine your legal obligations.

Microsoft is making this change to better align its execution of Copyright Levy Fee collection, reporting, and payment to legal requirements.

Yes, in some countries, but not all. On January 18, 2017, the European Court of Justice ruled that VAT cannot be applied to Copyright Levy Fees. However, some EU Member States still need to codify this change into local law.

Exemptions to the local Copyright Levy Fee laws exist but may vary by country. You are advised to check with your legal counsel regarding possible exemptions that may apply to your distribution or sales.

No. Microsoft invests in Readiness and Training programs to provide our Partners with the necessary IT and Business support to ensure successful transition to modified partner arrangements. We recommend that Partners utilize the support provided through these channels. ​

Please contact Microsoft at AskECT@microsoft.com