Phoenix: Experience with an Analysis and Optimization Framework


July 18, 2005


Although the Phoenix project is still under development at Microsoft, it offers a set of analysis and program transformation tools that can be used in many software engineering projects. In this session of the 2005 Microsoft Research Faculty Summit, faculty who have been using Phoenix as part of their research will discuss their research goals and offer some insight into how Phoenix has helped them advance their research agenda.


Bradley Calder, Chandra Krintz, Matt Mitchell, Michael Smith, Rajiv Gupta, and Vladimir Safonov

Chandra Krintz is an Assistant Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). She joined the UCSB faculty in 2001 after receiving her Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) under the advisement of Dr. Brad Calder. Chandra also received her M.S. degree in Computer Science from UCSD. Chandra’s research interests include adaptive compiler and runtime techniques that improve program performance or reduce power consumption by exploiting the time-varying behavior in underlying resource performance and program execution.

Rajiv Gupta is a Professor of Computer Science at The University of Arizona. His areas of research interest include Program Analysis; Compiler and Architectural Support for Optimization of Performance, Power and Memory in Embedded Systems; and Software Tools for Profiling, Slicing, and Debugging. Rajiv has published over 190 articles in refereed conferences and journals, he holds 8 US patents, and has supervised 15 PhD dissertations. Papers coauthored by him have been selected for: inclusion in 20 Years of PLDI (1979-1999), distinguished paper award in ICSE 2003, most original paper award in ICPP 2003, and outstanding paper award in ICECCS 1996.Rajiv is a member of the Technical Advisory Group on Networking and Information Technology of the US President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. He received the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1991. He served as the Program Chair for PLDI’03, HPCA’03, and LCTES’05 conferences and Co-General Chair for CGO’05 conference. He has also been appointed as the General Chair of PLDI’08 conference and Program Co-Chair of HiPEAC’08 conference. He serves as an Associate Editor for ACM Transactions on Architecture and Code Optimization and a number of other journals.