Faculty Summit 2015

Agenda

Now that the summit is over, we hope you will enjoy the recorded sessions and access the presentation materials.

Wednesday, July 8

Time Session Speaker Location
7:30 – 8:30
Breakfast
Hood/Baker
8:30 – 9:15
Welcome and Introduction
Microsoft’s Unique Role in the Computing Research Ecosystem
  • P. Anandan, Managing Director, Microsoft Research
  • Jeannette Wing, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research | video | slides
Kodiak
9:15 – 10:00
Panel: Progress in AI: Myths, Realities, and Aspirations
Moderator: Eric Horvitz, Managing Director, Microsoft Research | video
Panelists:

  • Christopher Bishop, Distinguished Scientist, Microsoft Research
  • Oren Etzioni, Chief Executive Officer, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence
  • Fei-Fei Li, Associate Professor, Stanford University
  • Michael Littman, Professor of Computer Science, Brown University
  • Josh Tenenbaum, Professor, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Kodiak
10:00 – 10:30
Break
10:30 – 12:00
Commonsense and World Knowledge
Chair: Margaret Mitchell, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Ray Mooney, University of Texas at Austin | slides
  • Dan Roth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | slides
  • Lucy Vanderwende, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Benjamin Van Durme, Johns Hopkins University | slides
Kodiak
What Can We Solve with a Quantum Computer?
Chair: Krysta Svore, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Edward Farhi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology | slides
  • Matthias Troyer, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich | slides
  • Nathan Wiebe, Microsoft Research | slides
Cascade
Research Challenges in Internet Governance
Chair: Carolyn Nguyen, Microsoft | video
Speakers:
  • Susan Aaronson, George Washington University
  • Laura DeNardis, American University
  • Stephanie Forrest, University of New Mexico
  • Brenden Kuerbis, Syracuse University
Rainier
Programmability at Cloud Scale
Chair: Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Gul Agha, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | slides
  • Philip Bernstein, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Sergey Bykov, Microsoft | slides
St. Helens
12:00 – 1:00
Lunch
 
1:00 – 2:30
Vision to Language
Chair: Larry Zitnick, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Julia Hockenmaier, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign | slides
  • Margaret Mitchell, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Richard Zemel, University of Toronto | slides
Kodiak
Computing for Global Development and Resource Constraint
Chair: Ed Cutrell, Microsoft Research | video | slides
Speakers:
  • Elizabeth Belding, University of California-Santa Barbara
  • Andrew Cross, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Aaditeshwar Seth, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi | slides
Cascade
Universal Design: How to Attract More Diverse Researchers
Chair: Kristin Tolle, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Lili Cheng, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Ann Quiroz Gates, University of Texas at El Paso | slides
  • Charles Isbell, Georgia Institute of Technology | slides
  • Ed Lazowska, University of Washington | slides
Rainier
Design Verification: Treating Networks Like Programs or Chips
Chairs: Nikolaj Bjorner and Ratul Mahajan, Microsoft Research | video | slides
Speakers:
  • Nate Foster, Cornell University | slides
  • Sharad Malik, Princeton University | slides
  • George Varghese, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Geoffrey Xie, Naval Postgraduate School | slides
St. Helens
2:30 – 3:00
Break
 
3:00 – 4:30
Question Answering
Chair: Matthew Richardson, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Yan Ke, Microsoft | slides
  • Benjamin Van Durme, Johns Hopkins University | slides
  • Scott Wen-tau Yih, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Luke Zettlemoyer, University of Washington | slides
Kodiak
Digital Ink and Touch on NextGen Devices
Chairs: Bill Buxton, Microsoft Research; Jeff Han, Microsoft
Speakers:
  • Niklas Elmqvist, University of Maryland | slides
  • Steven Feiner, Columbia University | slides
  • Tracy Hammond, Texas A&M University
  • Andries van Dam, Brown University | slides
Cascade
Computer Vision and Intelligent Services
Chairs: Baining Guo, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Martial Hebert, Carnegie Mellon University | slides
  • Tao Mei, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Zhengyou Zhang, Microsoft Research | slides
Rainier
5G: Opportunities and Challenges
Chair: Aakanksha Chowdhery, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Sharon Gillett, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Sundeep Rangan, New York University | slides
  • Xinyu Zhang, University of Wisconsin Madison | slides
  • Heather Zheng, University of California Santa Barbara | slides
St. Helens
4:30 – 5:15
Fireside Chat
Chair: Ed Lazowska, Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science & Engineering, University of Washington
Speaker: Harry Shum, Executive Vice President, Technology and Research, Microsoft
Kodiak
5:15 – 6:00
Travel to Seattle
 
6:00 – 9:00
Dinner at Chihuly Garden and Glass at the Seattle Center
 

Thursday, July 9

Time Session Speaker Location
8:00 – 9:00
Breakfast
Hood/Baker
9:00 – 9:45
Keynote
A Revolution Against Big-Brother Social Networks
Speaker: Monica Lam, Professor, Stanford University | video Kodiak
9:45 – 1:00
Research Showcase
 
McKinley
11:45 – 1:00
Lunch
1:00 – 2:30
Integrative AI
Chair: Eric Horvitz, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Dan Bohus, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Manuela Veloso, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Larry Zitnick, Microsoft Research | slides
Kodiak
Privacy in Context
Chair: Ben Zorn, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Jaeyeon Jung, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Ben Livshits, Microsoft Research
  • Arvind Narayanan, Princeton University
Rainier
Programming Models for Estimates, Approximation, and Probabilistic Reasoning
Chair: Kathryn S. McKinley, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Michael Carbin, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Noah Goodman, Stanford University | slides
  • Dan Grossman, University of Washington | slides
  • Todd Mytkowicz, Microsoft Research | slides
St. Helens
2:30 – 3:00
Break
 
3:00 – 4:30
Integrative AI: Panel
Chair: Dan Bohus, Microsoft Research | video
Panelists:
  • Eric Horvitz, Microsoft Research
  • Charles Rich, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Manuela Veloso, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Lidong Zhou, Microsoft Research
  • Larry Zitnick, Microsoft Research
Kodiak
The Holoscene: Virtual and Mixed Reality
Chair: Jaron Lanier, Microsoft Research
Speakers:
  • Mark Bolas, University of Southern California | slides
  • Steven Feiner, Columbia University | slides
  • Henry Fuchs, University of North Carolina | slides
  • Shahram Izadi, Microsoft Research
  • Ken Perlin, New York University
Cascade
Semantics and Knowledge Bases for Next-Generation Scholarly Discovery
Chairs: Alex Wade and Yang Song, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • C. Lee Giles, Pennsylvania State University | slides
  • Oren Etzioni, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence | slides
  • Jie Tang, Tsinghua University, China | slides
  • Kuansan Wang, Microsoft Research | slides
Rainier
Industry Embraces Open Source—What This Means for Academia
Chair: Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research | video
Speakers:
  • Ross Gardler, Microsoft
  • Phil Haack, GitHub | slides
  • Carlos Jensen, Oregon State University | slides
  • Rustan Leino, Microsoft Research | slides
St. Helens
4:30 – 5:30
A Better Way to Deliver Innovation?
Speaker: Peter Lee, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research | video | slides
Kodiak
5:30 – 7:00
Reception
 
Hood/Baker
7:00
Summit Closes
 

Abstracts

Wednesday, July 8

Commonsense and World Knowledge

Chair: Margaret Mitchell, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Ray Mooney, University of Texas at Austin | slides
  • Dan Roth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | slides
  • Lucy Vanderwende, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Benjamin Van Durme, Johns Hopkins University | slides

Everyday intelligence relies on a large store of background—or “common sense”—knowledge about the world. As humans, we acquire this knowledge in part through our experiences; artificially intelligent systems currently do not have access to this same kind of input. However, both explicit and implicit information about the world can be learned from data available in text and images. This session focuses on some key research in this area, with talks on extracting information from data in order to acquire commonsense knowledge about the human world.

What Can We Solve with a Quantum Computer?

Chair: Krysta Svore, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Edward Farhi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology | slides
  • Matthias Troyer, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich | slides
  • Nathan Wiebe, Microsoft Research | slides

In 1982, Richard Feynman first proposed using a quantum computer founded on the laws of quantum physics to simulate physical systems and achieve exponential computational speed-ups over conventional computers. In the thirty years since, quantum algorithms have been invented to solve problems in fields like number theory, chemistry, and materials science that would otherwise take longer than the lifetime of the universe to solve on an exascale classical machine. Quantum algorithms promise ways to break RSA (a mainstay of e-commerce), combat global warming, and design room-temperature superconductors. In addition, recent advances show how quantum computers can learn better deep machine learning models for use in speech and vision tasks. This session highlights killer applications of quantum computers and the potential global impacts, both scientific and societal, as well as pose challenging open questions for the computer science community to tackle.

Research Challenges in Internet Governance

Chair: Carolyn Nguyen, Microsoft | video

Speakers:

  • Susan Aaronson, George Washington University
  • Laura DeNardis, American University
  • Stephanie Forrest, University of New Mexico
  • Brenden Kuerbis, Syracuse University

Internet governance (IG), at its core, is a global discussion between governments, businesses, civil societies, technical experts, academic researchers, and other interested parties on how to shape the evolution and use of the Internet. A central debate concerns whether a federated multi-stakeholder approach, in which all interested parties can participate, is a more appropriate model than a centralized intergovernmental model, where countries would enter into treaties that are negotiated at the government-to-government level. Another issue concerns the role of the US government in managing the operations of the Internet.

This session aims to explain the issues involved in Internet governance, the upcoming milestones that make 2015 a critical year for engaging in IG, and explore how academic researchers can enable more thoughtful, evidence-based dialogues with policy stakeholders in the ongoing debates on issues ranging from required technology innovations, to economic analyses, multi-stakeholder policy frameworks, and studies on socio-cultural impacts.

Programmability at Cloud Scale

Chair: Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Gul Agha, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | slides
  • Philip Bernstein, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Sergey Bykov, Microsoft | slides

Building interactive services that are scalable and reliable is hard. Interactivity imposes strict constraints on availability and latency, as that directly impacts end-user experience. To support a large number of concurrent user sessions, high throughput is essential. Many mobile device applications are backed by cloud servers and storage, but the current technology for programming cloud applications is tedious and potentially error prone. Developing individual application components is not difficult, but developing an entire system that is scalable and fault tolerant and makes efficient use of resources is far more challenging, especially for mainstream developers who are not distributed system experts. In this session we look at modern approaches to solving these problems. A variety of applications require interactive services and we’ll discuss a few, such as game platforms and Internet of Things.

Vision to Language

Chair: Larry Zitnick, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Julia Hockenmaier, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign | slides
  • Margaret Mitchell, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Richard Zemel, University of Toronto | slides

The recent advances in computer vision, natural language processing and other related areas has led to a renewed interest in artificial intelligence applications spanning multiple domains. Specifically, the generation of natural human-like captions for images has seen an extraordinary increase in interest. In this session, the speakers provide insight into this area. They describe several techniques that combine state-of-the-art computer vision techniques and language models to produce descriptions of visual content with surprisingly high quality. The limitations of current approaches and the challenges that lie ahead are both emphasized.

Computing for Global Development and Resource Constraint

Chair: Ed Cutrell, Microsoft Research | video | slides

Speakers:

  • Elizabeth Belding, University of California-Santa Barbara
  • Andrew Cross, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Aaditeshwar Seth, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi | slides

As the cost of information technology falls and the reach of communication systems grows ever more pervasive, hundreds of millions of people are being exposed to computing technologies for the very first time. This gives rise to the question: can all this technology be used to help people in the world’s poorest regions improve their lives? What can computing technology do for the unique context of a wage laborer in India, a farmer in Tanzania, or a child in a São Paulo favela? This session focuses on some of the ways that research in IT and computing can contribute to the well-being of people in communities under severe resource constraint in terms of finances, language, education, infrastructure (power, Internet access) and availability of devices. Our speakers describe innovations in networking, health-care administration, and media sharing for communities in challenging contexts in the global south. We hope to engage the audience in a dialog on the challenges and unique rewards of computing research in these areas.

Universal Design: How to Attract More Diverse Researchers

Chair: Kristin Tolle, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Lili Cheng, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Ann Quiroz Gates, University of Texas at El Paso | slides
  • Charles Isbell, Georgia Institute of Technology | slides
  • Ed Lazowska, University of Washington | slides

The world is moving to create buildings, products, devices, services, and real and virtual environments that are more universally designed. It is possible to create environments that are usable and enable the success of all people regardless of age, culture, gender, or disability. Given the importance of computing as an underlying infrastructure technology, it is critical to the success of this movement to graduate more computer scientists from diverse groups, in particular PhDs, who can contribute to solutions with perspectives that may challenge conventional thought. With only 3.3% of the 2012–2013 doctoral graduates in computing coming from underrepresented ethnic groups, new and different recruitment and retention approaches at our academic institutions are required. This session introduces the new field of universal design and then panelists discuss the challenge of keeping up with the increased demand in computer science programs and hiring of underrepresented minorities. They suggest some controversial solutions to the industry issue. Join us for a lively discussion.

Design Verification: Treating Networks Like Programs or Chips

Chairs: Nikolaj Bjorner and Ratul Mahajan, Microsoft Research | video | slides

Speakers:

  • Nate Foster, Cornell University | slides
  • Sharad Malik, Princeton University | slides
  • George Varghese, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Geoffrey Xie, Naval Postgraduate School | slides

Surveys reveal that network outages are prevalent, and that many outages take hours to resolve, resulting in significant lost revenue. Many bugs are caused by errors in configuration files, which are programmed using arcane, low-level languages, akin to machine code. Further, mistakes are often hunted down using rudimentary tools such as Ping and Traceroute. Taking our cue from other fields such as hardware design, we would like to explore fresh approaches and contrast them to standard approaches to verification using model checking, SAT solvers, and so forth. While network verification is similar to finite state machine verification, there is domain-specific structure that can be exploited and a different set of properties to verify. Early results suggest that concepts from EDA and program verification can be leveraged to create what might be termed Network Design Automation. What might the equivalent of Layout Versus Schematic tools or Specification Mining be? Could there be a theory of types for networks? Our panelists explore this vision, touching upon modular network semantics, language design, performance invariants, and interactive network debuggers. We also explore, with the help of SDN experts, the connections between this vision and the vision of Software Designed Networks.

Question Answering

Chair: Matthew Richardson, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Yan Ke, Microsoft | slides
  • Benjamin Van Durme, Johns Hopkins University | slides
  • Scott Wen-tau Yih, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Luke Zettlemoyer, University of Washington | slides

Natural-language question answering (QA) has clear practical and scientific values, such as evaluating a machine’s understanding of a domain, or providing succinct and precise answers to search engine queries. While both Bing and Google have incorporated more “semantics” to return direct answers to queries, QA is far from solved, and is becoming more important as natural language interaction becomes popular (e.g., Siri and Cortana). In this session, we invite experts from both academia and Microsoft to present recent technologies for improving QA. The topics include traditional IR approaches for QA, machine reading for knowledge acquisition and representation, and semantic parsing for answering questions using structured databases like Freebase or Satori. In addition, we invite product groups (Bing QnA team) to discuss the technical challenges faced in the real-world scenarios and highlight the research need.

Digital Ink and Touch on NextGen Devices

Chairs: Bill Buxton, Microsoft Research; Jeff Han, Microsoft

Speakers:

  • Niklas Elmqvist, University of Maryland | slides
  • Steven Feiner, Columbia University | slides
  • Tracy Hammond, Texas A&M University
  • Andries van Dam, Brown University | slides

Microsoft recently unveiled plans to go to market with a brand new large touch device, the Surface Hub. The opportunity for this device to enhance and even transform how some research areas visualize, capture and display findings is brand new territory. This session shows some of the earliest efforts to understand how these new, powerful devices can provide exciting new platforms for research.

Computer Vision and Intelligent Services

Chair: Baining Guo, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Martial Hebert, Carnegie Mellon University | slides
  • Tao Mei, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Zhengyou Zhang, Microsoft Research | slides

Recent advances in image understanding have opened many avenues for computer vision-based intelligent services. These technological advances—which span a broad range of visual understanding tasks including object recognition, video event detection, image search, and scene reconstruction—can facilitate a variety of image analysis applications from visual identification of users to 3D city mapping and detecting child exploitation images. Moreover, by harnessing the power of the cloud, computationally-intensive vision tasks have become increasingly accessible to ordinary users. This session focuses on the latest developments in image understanding as well as a discussion on consumer services that they may enable.

5G: Opportunities and Challenges

Chair: Aakanksha Chowdhery, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Sharon Gillett, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Sundeep Rangan, New York University | slides
  • Xinyu Zhang, University of Wisconsin Madison | slides
  • Heather Zheng, University of California Santa Barbara | slides

The demand for Internet speeds continues to explode with the new applications such as augmented reality, artificial intelligence on mobile devices, and Internet of Things. As more and more wireless devices connect to the Internet and more and more data flows to and from the cloud, the wireless spectrum once deemed sufficient to handle such traffic quickly is getting stretched. The challenges include enabling 1–100 Gigabits/sec of speeds per device to 1,000x more devices within 10-millisecond latency at lower costs and longer battery lives. Come and learn about how 5G promises to overcome these challenges from both technical and policy perspectives of a panel of prominent academic and Microsoft researchers.

Thursday, July 9

A Revolution Against Big-Brother Social Networks

Speaker: Monica Lam, Professor, Stanford University | video

With the widespread adoption of proprietary social networks like Facebook and mobile chat platforms like Wechat, we may be heading to a future where all our communication are monetized and our online transactions are mediated by closed monopolistic big-data companies.

This talk describes an open social movement led by Omlet, an open messaging service and distributed computing platform that spun out of four years of research at Stanford University. To the user, Omlet appears as a super chat app with many plug-ins and extensions; deep down, Omlet is actually a distributed social OS and network. At the heart of Omlet is a universal messaging system where devices can communicate with each other via existing identities such as phone numbers or email addresses, without giving up ownership of the communication data. Built upon this messaging layer is a distributed semantic file system that enables collaborative apps be written easily while allowing data be distributed in the cloud service of the users’ choice.

Launched in March 2014, Omlet has already been distributed to millions of phones. Because of its data protection policy, Omlet is a suitable foundation for social applications in education, commerce, finance, and Internet-of-things.

Integrative AI

Chair: Eric Horvitz, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Dan Bohus, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Manuela Veloso, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Larry Zitnick, Microsoft Research | slides

Over the last 15 years, significant advances have been made in inference and decision making under uncertainty, machine learning, vision, speech recognition, natural language processing, and dialog. Supported by these advances, efforts to develop end-to-end intelligent systems that integrate multiple competencies and act in the open world have brought into focus new research challenges. Interesting opportunities arise at the confluence of traditional AI fields, for instance between computer vision and natural language processing. The science of engineering larger, integrated systems that are efficient, robust, transparent, and maintainable is still very much in its infancy. The speakers in this session provide a sampler of research challenges, from work at the intersection of vision and language, to situated dialogue systems and interactive robots, and highlight opportunities in integrative AI. The session was followed by a panel discussion.

Privacy in Context

Chair: Ben Zorn, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Jaeyeon Jung, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Ben Livshits, Microsoft Research
  • Arvind Narayanan, Princeton University

Big data equals Big Brother? The big data explosion forces us to confront the privacy implications of this wide-ranging societal change. In this session, we talk about privacy-related efforts: both in Microsoft Research and in academia. What does privacy means in the context of always-on sensors such as Kinect? What happens to parents and teenagers living in Internet-connected homes? How do we sanitize documents on a large scale? How can we quantify privacy and privacy loss? These topics and others are discussed with the goal of creating shared understanding as well as collaborative research opportunities.

Programming Models for Estimates, Approximation, and Probabilistic Reasoning

Chair: Kathryn S. McKinley, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Michael Carbin, Microsoft Research | slides
  • Noah Goodman, Stanford University | slides
  • Dan Grossman, University of Washington | slides
  • Todd Mytkowicz, Microsoft Research | slides

Many emerging applications produce and use estimates in domains as diverse as probabilistic reasoning, machine learning, data analytics, approximate computing, and sensor programming. This session focuses on programming language models for expert developers and the masses (application programmers without statistics background). In particular, we explore how well current languages support developers in producing estimation models, computing with estimates, and reasoning about what the resulting programs mean.

Integrative AI: Panel

Chair: Dan Bohus, Microsoft Research | video

Panelists:

  • Eric Horvitz, Microsoft Research
  • Charles Rich, Worcester Polytechnic Institute
  • Manuela Veloso, Carnegie Mellon University
  • Lidong Zhou, Microsoft Research
  • Larry Zitnick, Microsoft Research

The panel discusses challenges and opportunities in integrative AI, an area concerned with the development of systems that efficiently and robustly integrate multiple AI technologies (e.g., vision, speech, learning, real-time control) and can act and interact in the open world. While over the past years we have seen significant progress on core AI technologies, the science of integrating these competencies into larger systems that are robust, transparent, and maintainable remains very much in its infancy. Numerous research and engineering questions come to the fore: from algorithmic challenges in multimodal representations and modeling, to the science of systems that self-monitor, diagnose their limitations and improve through interaction, all the way to the necessity of research platforms, data, and broader community efforts in this space.

The Holoscene: Virtual and Mixed Reality

Chair: Jaron Lanier, Microsoft Research

Speakers:

  • Mark Bolas, University of Southern California | slides
  • Steven Feiner, Columbia University | slides
  • Henry Fuchs, University of North Carolina | slides
  • Shahram Izadi, Microsoft Research
  • Ken Perlin, New York University

This is a special time for research in VR and mixed reality. Consumer products such as Valve Vive, Oculus Rift, and HoloLens will soon be available. While long anticipated, current developments bring up questions that are not yet answered: Should researchers still seek to create VR hardware that remains ahead of the commercial curve? Can that even be done? Or, are there cloud architectural challenges that the research community is better suited to attack than industry? Broadly, how can researchers best interact with an explosive, competitive industry? Are there important insights that commercial developers haven’t yet gleaned from the VR research community? How can and should the wave of “consumerization” influence basic VR research? What are the best experimental methods for engaging large numbers of users in VR-based human factors/cog sci/social research? Might commercial interests steer research away from important methodologies or topics? Are there new ethical questions?

Semantics and Knowledge Bases for Next-Generation Scholarly Discovery

Chairs: Alex Wade and Yang Song, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • C. Lee Giles, Pennsylvania State University | slides
  • Oren Etzioni, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence | slides
  • Jie Tang, Tsinghua University, China | slides
  • Kuansan Wang, Microsoft Research | slides

As web search is becoming more and more structured thanks to the availability of knowledge bases, scholar engines are also evolving towards that direction while facing the similar challenges and issues. This session focuses on bridging the gap between unstructured text and structured relationships to create new sematic scholar engines. We hope this session can serve as a discussion forum to bring together researchers from both academia and industrial labs from different disciplines to work together and exchange ideas on how to jointly optimize scholar engines and knowledge base systems while sharing their respective experiences in dealing with common issues in both areas.

Industry Embraces Open Source—What This Means for Academia

Chair: Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research | video

Speakers:

  • Ross Gardler, Microsoft
  • Phil Haack, GitHub | slides
  • Carlos Jensen, Oregon State University | slides
  • Rustan Leino, Microsoft Research | slides

Open source is a powerful way of advancing software development and sharing data for experimentation. Microsoft has started putting research projects as well as key software such as .NET in open source repositories. Developers are jumping on to fix bugs and extend the systems. Academia has long wanted access to industrial projects, but now that it is a reality, what exactly can be done and by whom? There are many options, for example: instructors can use the software as illustration in their classes; software can be extended for research purposes; capstone projects can be based on OSS; and open data can be shared for analysis. The panel of experts bring their experiences with using open source, from repositories, creation, and education.

Speakers

Susan Ariel Aaronson, George Washington University

Susan Ariel AaronsonSusan Ariel Aaronson is research professor at The George Washington University’s Elliott School of International Affairs and the former Minerva Chair at the National War College. Dr. Aaronson’s research examines the relationship between economic change and human rights. She is currently directing projects on digital trade and digital rights, repression and civil conflict, and rethinking labor rights. Her work has been funded by major international foundations including MacArthur, Ford, Rockefeller; governments such as the Netherlands, United States, and Canada; the UN, ILO, and World Bank, and US corporations including Ford Motor. Aaronson is the author of six books and numerous articles on trade, human rights, digital trade, and globalization. She is a member of Working Group 2 of the Freedom Online Coalition (24 governments working on digital rights). Aaronson is also the director of the eBay Policy Scholars and is developing a new international affairs curriculum on the Internet.

Gul Agha, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Gul AghaGul Agha is professor of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Agha is a Fellow of the IEEE. He served as editor-in-chief of IEEE Concurrency: Parallel, Distributed and Mobile Computing (1994-98), and of ACM Computing Surveys (1999-2007). He has published over 200 research articles and supervised 30 PhD dissertations. His book, Actors, is among the most widely cited in concurrent and distributed computing. Besides work on semantics and implementation of actor languages, Agha’s research group has developed novel coordination languages, methods for software testing (including concolic testing), computational learning for verification, statistical model checking, and Euclidean model checking. In collaboration with civil engineers, he has developed methods for autonomic structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure using wireless smart sensor networks. Agha is a co-founder of Embedor Technologies, a company providing solutions for infrastructure monitoring in smart cities.

P. Anandan, Managing Director, Microsoft Research

P. AnandanP. Anandan is the managing director of Microsoft Research Outreach. Previously, he was the managing director of Microsoft Research India. He was awarded the title of Distinguished Scientist in 2010 in recognition of his contributions to Microsoft and the research community. Since June 1997, before being named managing director of Microsoft Research India, Anandan was a senior researcher at Microsoft Research headquarters in Redmond, where he built one of the world’s strongest research teams in computer vision and video processing.During that time, he also served as an ambassador for the Microsoft Research University Relations program in India. Anandan helped develop strong relationships between Indian universities and Microsoft Research. He has also represented Microsoft in meetings with the government of India to emphasize the company’s commitment to research and development. He was part of the working group constituted by the 12th Planning Commission to make recommendations on India’s Higher Education Policy. Anandan continues Microsoft Research’s ongoing relationships with the government and academic communities in his new role.

Before joining Microsoft, Anandan was an assistant professor of computer science for four years at Yale University, where he founded the computer vision group. Following this, he was a research manager at Sarnoff Corp. His group developed state-of-the-art video stabilization technology and systems for ground and airborne video surveillance. During a research career that has spanned two decades, Anandan has done pioneering research in video motion analysis and is recognized for his fundamental contributions in the area of optical flow, motion estimation, video mosaicking and 3-D scene analysis.

Anandan holds a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, which presented him with a Distinguished Alumni award in 2006. He earned his master of science in computer science from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, and his undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology Madras. He received the Distinguished Alumni award from IIT Madras in 2010, and was also inducted into the “Hall of Computing” by the University of Nebraska in 2010. Anandan is currently on the Board of Governors of IIIT Delhi and IIT Madras.

Anandan is a native of Chennai, India. His interests outside work include the study of philosophy, especially philosophy of the mind.

Elizabeth M. Belding, University of California-Santa Barbara

Elizabeth M. BeldingElizabeth M. Belding is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Elizabeth’s research focuses on mobile networking, specifically monitoring, advanced service support, and solutions for developing and underdeveloped regions. She is the founder and director of the Mobility Management and Networking (MOMENT) Laboratory. Elizabeth is the author of over 100 technical papers and has served on more than 60 program committees for networking conferences. She is currently on the editorial board of the IEEE Pervasive Magazine. She is an ACM Distinguished Scientist and an IEEE Fellow, and she received the 2015 NCWIT Harrold and Notkin Research and Graduate Mentoring Award and the 2012 UCSB Outstanding Graduate Mentor Award.

Philip A. Bernstein, Microsoft Research

Philip A. BernsteinPhilip A. Bernstein is a Distinguished Scientist at Microsoft Research. Over the past 35 years, he has also been a product architect at Microsoft and Digital Equipment Corp., a professor at Harvard University and Wang Institute of Graduate Studies, and a VP Software at Sequoia Systems. During that time, he has published many papers and two books on the theory and implementation of database systems, especially on transaction processing and data integration, which are still the main focus of his research. He is an ACM Fellow, a winner of the ACM SIGMOD Innovations Award, a member of the Washington State Academy of Sciences and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received a B.S. degree from Cornell and M.Sc. and Ph.D. from University of Toronto.

Chris Bishop, Distinguished Scientist, Microsoft Research

Chris BishopChris Bishop is a Distinguished Scientist and Deputy Managing Director at Microsoft Research Cambridge, where he is head of the Machine Learning and Perception group. His research interests include probabilistic approaches to machine learning, as well as their application to fields such as biomedical sciences and healthcare. He is also Professor of Computer Science at the University of Edinburgh where he is a member of the Institute for Adaptive and Neural Computation in the School of Informatics. He is a Fellow of Darwin College Cambridge, a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. Chris is the author of the influential textbooks Neural Networks for Pattern Recognition (Oxford University Press, 1995) which has over 23,000 citations, and Pattern Recognition and Machine Learning (Springer, 2006), which has over 16,000 citations. He has an MA in Physics from Oxford, and a PhD in quantum field theory from the University of Edinburgh.

Judith Bishop, Microsoft Research

Judith BishopJudith Bishop is director of Computer Science at Microsoft Research. Her role is to create strong links between Microsoft’s research groups and universities globally, through encouraging projects, supporting conferences, and engaging directly in research. Her expertise spans programming languages, software engineering, and distributed systems with a strong practical bias. Her current projects are Orleans and Code Hunt, and she worked previously on TouchDevelop and Try F#. She received her PhD from the University of Southampton and was a professor in South Africa for many years, with visiting positions in the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Italy, and the United States. She was general co-chair of ICSE 2010 and co-chair of several Microsoft Research summits. She serves frequently on editorial, program, and award committees. She has written 16 books on programming, which have been translated into six languages. Judith received the ACM Distinguished Educator Award in 2014, the IFIP Silver Core and Outstanding Service Award in 2006, and South Africa’s Distinguished Woman Scientist of the Year in 2005.

Nikolaj Bjorner, Microsoft Research

Nikolaj BjornerNikolaj Bjorner is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, Redmond, working in the area of Automated Theorem Proving and Software Engineering. His current main line of work is around the state-of-the art theorem prover Z3, which is used as a foundation of several software engineering tools. Previously, he designed the DFSR, Distributed File System – Replication, co-designed RDC, remote differential compression, protocol both shipped with Windows Server since 2005 and before that worked on distributed file sharing systems at a startup XDegrees, and program synthesis and transformation systems at the Kestrel Institute. He received his master’s and Ph.D. degrees in computer science from Stanford University, and spent the first three years of university at DTU and DIKU.

Dan Bohus, Microsoft Research

Dan BohusDan Bohus is a Researcher in the Adaptive Systems and Interaction Group at Microsoft Research. The central question that drives his long term research agenda is: how can we develop systems that naturally embed interaction and computation deeply into the flow of everyday tasks, activities, and collaborations? In the last few years Dan’s work has focused on developing computational models for multiparty engagement, turn taking, interaction planning, and on addressing the challenges in inference and decision making that such models bring to the fore. Prior to joining Microsoft, Dan obtained his Ph.D. degree from Carnegie Mellon University, where he investigated problems of dialog management and error handling in speech interfaces.

Mark Bolas, University of Southern California

Mark BolasMark Bolas, who is the Director of the Mixed Reality Lab at the Institute for Creative Technologies and an Associate Professor at the USC School of Cinematic Arts, has been exploring presence and immersive experiences for over three decades, putting forward his thoughts on the medium of virtual reality as early as 1989. Bolas’ decision to open-source his seminal work and research has helped to usher in the current VR revolution. The influence of his lab’s DIY VR projects (FOV2GO, VR2GO, MxR Unity Package) can be seen in current commercial products like the Samsung GearVR, the Oculus Rift and Google Cardboard. Emerging VR companies founded by students who have prototyped work at the MxR Lab under the supervision of Bolas, include: Survios, Otherworld Interactive, Oculus VR, and the Emblematic Group.

Bolas has recently launched a new effort, The Rosetta Project, to bridge the gap between the language of cinema and the emerging medium of VR, including a fun project that brings stop motion maquettes into head mounted displays via light field rendering. Bolas co-founded Fakespace Labs, Inc. in 1988 and developed and sold VR hardware and systems for dozens of major research labs over the decades. He holds more than twenty patents and has been recognized with awards from the Consumer Electronics Association, Popular Science, SIGGRAPH Best Emerging Technology, IEEE’s Industry Excellence, and IEEE’s Virtual Reality Technical Achievement Award.

Bill Buxton, Microsoft Research

Bill BuxtonBill Buxton is a relentless advocate for innovation, design, and especially the appropriate consideration of human values, capacity, and culture in the conception, implementation, and use of new products and technologies. This is reflected in his research, teaching, talks, and writing — including his column on design and innovation for BusinessWeek.com, and his 2007 book, Sketching User Experiences.

Sergey Bykov, Microsoft

Sergey BykovSergey Bykov joined Microsoft in 2001 and worked in several product groups, such as e-Business Servers, Embedded Devices, and Online Services, before moving to Research in 2008. He has been working on Project “Orleans” since its inception, and is leading the team that keeps innovating to bring more exciting features to the platform.

Michael Carbin, Microsoft Research

Michael CarbinMichael Carbin is researcher at Microsoft Research, a visiting scientist at MIT, and will be joining MIT as an assistant professor in January of 2016. His research interests include the theory, design, and implementation of programming systems, including languages, program logics, static and dynamic program analyses, runtime systems, and mechanized verifiers. Carbin’s recent research has focused on the design and implementation of programming systems that deliver improved performance and resilience by incorporating approximate computing and self-healing. His research on verifying the reliability of programs that execute on unreliable hardware has received best paper awards at leading programming languages conferences (OOPSLA 2013 and OOPSLA 2014). His undergraduate research at Stanford University received the Wegbreit Prize for Best Computer Science Undergraduate Honors Thesis. As a graduate student at MIT, Carbin received the MIT Lemelson Presidential and Microsoft Research Graduate Fellowships.

Lili Cheng, Microsoft Research

Lili ChengLili Cheng is a Distinguished Engineer and General Manager in Microsoft Research. She manages FUSE (Future Social Experiences) Labs, which is a multidisciplinary team which applies expertise to areas such as: interest-based networks, nearby sharing, creative expression, crowd work, and collective action. We collaborate with colleagues in startups, academia, the art & design community, as other teams across Microsoft and industry.

Prior to Microsoft, Lili worked in Apple Computer’s Advanced Technology Group, on the User Interface research team, where she focused on Quicktime Conferencing and Quicktime VR. Lili is also a registered architect; she worked in Tokyo and Los Angeles for Nihon Sekkei and Skidmore Owings and Merrill on commercial urban design and large-scale building projects. She has taught at NYU-Interactive Telecommunications as well as Harvard University.

Lili was born in Tokyo, is married with three boys, and lives in Bellevue Washington.

Aakanksha Chowdhery, Microsoft Research

Aakanksha ChowdheryDr. Aakanksha Chowdhery is a postdoctoral researcher in the Mobility and Networking Group at Microsoft Research. She completed her MS and PhD in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. In 2012, she became the first woman to win the Paul Baran Marconi Young Scholar Award, given for the scientific contributions in the field of communications and the Internet. She also received the Youngmi Joo Stanford School of Engineering Fellowship and the Stanford’s Diversifying Academia Recruiting Excellence (DARE) fellowship. Prior to joining Stanford, she completed her Bachelor’s degree at IIT Delhi where she received the President’s Silver Medal Award. Her research focuses the design of algorithms and protocols for next-generation mobile systems, wireless and wire-line networks.

Andrew Cross, Microsoft Research

Andrew CrossAndrew Cross is a Research Program Manager in the Technology for Emerging Markets group at the Microsoft Research lab in Bangalore. His research and project focus, spanning work in Latin America, Africa, and for the past 3.5 years India, is on developing low-cost technology-based solutions that enhance and empower human efforts to deliver quality healthcare and education. His role at Microsoft Research is piloting novel research ideas in the field, and scaling up successful trials as broader deployments often in collaboration with universities, hospitals, NGOs, and government organizations. His current work overlaps several fields including human-computer interaction (HCI), education, health, and development. His education includes a BS in Computer Engineering and Plan II Honors at the University of Texas at Austin, and MPhil in Engineering for Sustainable Development at the University of Cambridge.

Ed Cutrell, Microsoft Research

Ed CutrellEd Cutrell manages the Technology for Emerging Markets (TEM) group at Microsoft Research India. TEM is a multidisciplinary group working to study, design, build, and evaluate technologies and systems useful for people living in underserved rural and urban communities. The goal of this work is to understand how people in the world’s poor and developing communities interact with information technologies, and to invent new ways for technology to meet their needs and aspirations. Ed has worked in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) since 2000; he is trained in cognitive neuropsychology, with a PhD from the University of Oregon.

Laura DeNardis, American University

Laura DenardisDr. Laura DeNardis is a scholar of Internet architecture and governance and a professor in the School of Communication at American University in Washington, DC. The author of The Global War for Internet Governance (Yale University Press 2014) and other books, her expertise has been featured in Science Magazine, The Economist, National Public Radio, New York Times, Time Magazine, Christian Science Monitor, Slate, Reuters, Forbes, The Atlantic, and The Wall Street Journal. Dr. DeNardis is an affiliated fellow of the Yale Law School Information Society Project and previously served as its executive director. She is a Senior Fellow of the Centre for International Governance Innovation and holds an international appointment as research director for the Global Commission on Internet Governance. She holds an AB in Engineering Science from Dartmouth College, a Master of Engineering from Cornell University, a PhD in Science and Technology Studies from Virginia Tech, and was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from Yale Law School.

Niklas Elmqvist, University of Maryland

Niklas ElmqvistNiklas Elmqvist is an associate professor in the College of Information Studies at University of Maryland, College Park. His research areas include information visualization, human-computer interaction (HCI), and visual analytics. He received his PhD in December 2006 from the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at Chalmers University of Technology. Before joining University of Maryland, he was at Purdue where he was a postdoctoral researcher in the Aviz group at INRIA Saclay in Paris, France.

Oren Etzioni, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence

Oren EtzioniDr. Oren Etzioni is Chief Executive Officer of the Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence. He was a Professor at the University of Washington’s Computer Science department starting in 1991, receiving several awards including GeekWire’s Hire of the Year (2014), Seattle’s Geek of the Year (2013), the Robert Engelmore Memorial Award (2007), the IJCAI Distinguished Paper Award (2005), AAAI Fellow (2003), and a National Young Investigator Award (1993). He was also the founder or co-founder of several companies, including Farecast (sold to Microsoft in 2008) and Decide (sold to eBay in 2013), and the author of over 100 technical papers that have garnered roughly 20,000 citations. The goal of Oren’s research is to solve fundamental problems in AI, particularly the automatic learning of knowledge from text. Oren received his Ph.D. from Carnegie Mellon University in 1991, and his B.A. from Harvard in 1986.

Edward Farhi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Eddie FarhiEdward (Eddie) Farhi was educated at the Bronx High School of Science and had stops at Brandeis, Harvard, SLAC and CERN before coming to MIT where since 2004 he has served as the Director of the Center for Theoretical Physics. He was trained as a particle physicist and started his career working on jets which are collimated beams of particles now of great interest at the LHC. He also worked on models of elementary particles in which quarks and leptons are themselves composites. He studied the properties of a superdense form of matter called Strange Matter. He worked with Alan Guth on two fundamental questions in general relativity: Is it possible to create a new inflationary universe in the lab? Is it possible to construct a time machine in a universe which does not have one?

After learning that a quantum computer could be used for factoring, Eddie devoted himself to the development of quantum algorithms, advocating a physics-based approach. Working with Goldstone, Gutmann and Sipser, he introduced the Quantum Adiabatic Algorithm which is the basis of the design of the D-Wave machine and other superconducting device architectures. He showed that ideas from quantum scattering theory could be used to develop quantum algorithms and he (along with Goldstone and Gutmann) then showed that a quantum computer can determine who wins a game faster than any classical algorithm. Eddie along with Shor and others collaborators introduced a quantum cryptographic protocol, quantum money. Recently Eddie (again with Goldstone and Gutmann) introduced a quantum algorithm for approximate optimization. Here they were able to prove that the quantum algorithm could achieve non-trivial approximation ratios. This result is the first of its kind in showing the power of quantum computers for combinatorial search and is opening a whole line of investigation related to current ideas in classical computer science.

Steve Feiner, Columbia University

Steven FeinerSteve Feiner is professor of Computer Science at Columbia University, where he directs the Computer Graphics and User Interfaces Lab, and co-directs the Columbia Vision and Graphics Center. His lab has been doing Augmented Reality (AR) research for over 20 years, designing and evaluating interaction and visualization techniques, creating the first outdoor mobile AR system using a see-through head-worn display, and pioneering experimental applications of AR to fields such as tourism, journalism, maintenance, and construction. Steve received an A.B. in Music and a Ph.D. in Computer Science, both from Brown University. He is coauthor of Computer Graphics: Principles and Practice, received the IEEE VGTC 2014 Virtual Reality Career Award, and was elected to the CHI Academy. Together with his students, he has won the ACM UIST Lasting Impact Award and best paper awards at ACM UIST, ACM CHI, ACM VRST, and IEEE ISMAR.

Stephanie Forrest, University of New Mexico

Stephanie ForrestStephanie Forrest is Regents Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at the University of New Mexico (UNM) in Albuquerque, and a member of the Santa Fe Institute External Faculty. She was educated at St. John’s College (B.A.) and The University of Michigan (M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science). She served as department chair 2006-2011 and recently spent one year at the U.S. Department of State working on cyber-policy. Forrest has over 20 years’ experience leading interdisciplinary research and education programs at UNM, primarily in the intersection of biology and computation, including work on evolutionary diseases such as influenza and cancer, immunological algorithms for computer security, automatically repairing bugs in software, and studying complex systems.

Some of Forrest’s awards include the Stanislaw Ulam Memorial Lectures (2013), the UNM Annual Research Lecture (2012), the ACM/AAAI Allen Newell Award (2011), and the Presidential Young Investigator Award (1991). She is a Fellow of the IEEE.

Nate Foster, Cornell University

Nate FosterNate Foster is an assistant professor of Computer Science at Cornell University. His research focuses on developing language abstractions and tools for building reliable systems. He received a PhD in Computer and Information Science from the University of Pennsylvania in 2009, an MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science and Medicine from Cambridge University in 2008, and a BA in Computer Science from Williams College in 2001. His awards include a Sloan Research Fellowship, an NSF CAREER Award, a Most Influential POPL Paper Award, a Tien ’72 Teaching Award, an NSDI ’13 Community Award, a Yahoo! Academic Career Enhancement Award, and the Penn CIS Morris and Dorothy Rubinoff Award.

Henry Fuchs, University of North Carolina

Henry FuchsHenry Fuchs (PhD, University of Utah, 1975) is the Federico Gil Distinguished Professor of Computer Science and adjunct professor of Biomedical Engineering at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is one of three co-directors (together with Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann and Markus Gross) of the BeingThere International Research Center in Telepresence, collaboration between ETH Zurich, NTU Singapore, and UNC Chapel Hill. Active in computer graphics since the 1970s, Fuchs has coauthored over 200 papers on a variety of topics, including rendering algorithms (BSP Trees), graphics hardware (Pixel-Planes), virtual environments, telepresence, medical and training applications. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, recipient of the 1992 ACM SIGGRAPH Achievement Award, and the 2013 IEEE VGTC Virtual Reality Career Award.

Ross Gardler, Microsoft

Ross GardlerRoss Gardler is a long-time open source guy. In the past he ran the publicly funded OSS Watch open source advisory service to the UK Higher and Further Education Sector and currently works for Microsoft Open Technologies with a focus on Linux. He is currently the President of the Apache Software Foundation.

Ann Quiroz Gates, University of Texas at El Paso

Ann GatesDr. Ann Quiroz Gates is a Professor and Chair of the Computer Science Department at the University of Texas at El Paso and directs the NSF-funded Cyber-ShARE Center of Excellence. Her research areas are in formal software specification and scientific workflows. Gates leads the Computing Alliance for Hispanic-Serving Institutions, an NSF-funded consortium that is focused on the recruitment, retention, and advancement of Hispanics in computing, and is a founding member of the National Center for Women in Information Technology. She received CRA’s 2015 A. Nico Habermann Award, the 2010 Anita Borg Institute Social Impact Award, and the 2009 Richard A. Tapia Achievement Award for Scientific Scholarship, Civic Science, and Diversifying Computing. In addition, Gates was recognized for her service to the IEEE-Computer Society with the IEEE-CS Golden Core Award and was named to Hispanic Business magazine’s 100 Influential Hispanics in 2006.

C. Lee Giles, Pennsylvania State University

Dr. C. Lee Giles is the David Reese Professor of Information Sciences and Technology at the Pennsylvania State University with appointments in the departments of Computer Science and Engineering, and Supply Chain and Information Systems. His research interests are intelligent cyberinfrastructure and big data, specialty search engines, information retrieval, knowledge and information extraction, data mining, entity disambiguation, and social networks with over 400 papers published in these areas. He was a co-creator of the popular academic search engine CiteSeer (now CiteSeerX) and related scholarly and scientific search engines. He is a fellow of the ACM, IEEE, and INNS. He recently gave a keynote at the ACM International Conference on Information and Knowledge Management (CIKM 2013) on “Scholarly Big Data: Information Extraction and Data Mining.” His research has been funded by NSF, DARPA, Microsoft, Dow Chemical, Lockheed Martin, Raytheon, Smithsonian, IBM, NEC, NASA, Ford, and others.

Sharon Gillett, Microsoft Research

Sharon GillettMs. Sharon Gillett has been principal technology policy strategist at Microsoft Corporation since June 2013. Ms. Sharon Gillett is head of the Massachusetts Department of Telecommunications and Cable. Ms. Gillett is a member of Advisory Board at Meadow Networks, Inc. Her experience includes 10 years in the high-tech industry developing software and managing projects in computer networking (at BBN) and supercomputing (at Thinking Machines Corporation). She served as the executive director and research associate for the Internet and Telecoms Convergence Consortium, an industry-sponsored consortium at MIT. Her research lies at the intersection of Internet infrastructure technology and policy. She has published numerous peer-reviewed and trade-press articles focusing on broadband policy issues and has been a lecturer for communications policy at both MIT and Cambridge University in the UK.

Noah D. Goodman, Stanford University

Noah GoodmanNoah D. Goodman is assistant professor of Psychology, Linguistics (by courtesy), and Computer Science (by courtesy) at Stanford University. He studies the computational basis of human thought, merging behavioral experiments with formal methods from statistics and programming languages. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Texas at Austin in 2003. In 2005, he entered cognitive science, working as postdoc and research scientist at MIT. In 2010 he moved to Stanford where he runs the Computation and Cognition Lab. CoCoLab studies higher-level human cognition including language understanding, social reasoning, and concept learning; the lab also works on applications of these ideas and enabling technologies such as probabilistic programming languages.

Dan Grossman, University of Washington

Dan GrossmanDan Grossman has been a faculty member in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington since 2003. He holds the J. Ray Bowen Professorship for Innovation in Engineering Education. His research interests are in several areas of programming languages, and he has collaborated for several years with colleagues in computer architecture on better approaches to concurrent programming and approximate programming. Dan completed his Ph.D. at Cornell University and his undergraduate studies at Rice University.

Phil Haack, GitHub

Phil HaackPhil Haack (yes, it’s pronounced “hack”) works at GitHub as an engineering manager for the Desktop team. This team is responsible for GitHub for Mac, GitHub for Window, and the GitHub Extension for Visual Studio. He also led the team that created https://choosealicense.com/, an effort to demystify and simplify the choosing of an open source license. Prior to GitHub, he was a senior program manager at Microsoft responsible for shipping ASP.NET MVC and NuGet. These projects were released under open source licenses and helped served as examples to other teams for how to ship open source software. He regularly writes for his blog http://haacked.com/ and tweets random observations on Twitter as @haacked. He also speaks at conferences here and there, and has quit writing technical books forever several times now.

Tracy Hammond, Texas A&M University

Tracy HammondTracy Hammond is the Director of the Sketch Recognition Lab and Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, Dr. Hammond is an international leader in activity recognition (focusing on eye, body, and sketch motions), haptics, intelligent fabrics, smartphone development, and computer human interaction research.

Jeff Han, Microsoft

Jeff HanAs General Manager for Microsoft Surface Hub, Jeff Han leads a world-class interdisciplinary team of hardware, manufacturing, and software engineers, along with interaction designers and researchers dedicated to building large-format interactive displays and experiences.

Martial Hebert, Carnegie Mellon University

Martial HebertMartial Hebert is a Professor of Robotics at Carnegie-Mellon University and director of the Robotics Institute. His interest includes computer vision, especially recognition and scene understanding in images and video data, model building and object recognition from 3D data, and perception for mobile robots and for intelligent vehicles. His group has developed approaches for object recognition and scene analysis in images, 3D point clouds, and video sequences. In the area of machine perception for robotics, his group has developed techniques for people detection, tracking, and prediction, and for understanding the environment of ground vehicles from sensor data.

Julia Hockenmaier, University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign

Julia HockenmaierJulia Hockenmaier is associate professor in Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She works on natural language processing. Her current research focuses on automatic image description, statistical parsing, and unsupervised grammar induction. Julia received her PhD from the University of Edinburgh and did postdoctoral work at the University of Pennsylvania. She has received an NSF CAREER award was shortlisted for the British Computer Society’s Distinguished Dissertation award.

Eric Horvitz, Microsoft Research

Eric HorvitzEric Horvitz is serving as the managing director of the Microsoft Research lab at Redmond, balancing lab-wide responsibilities with ongoing research on machine intelligence and on opportunities to leverage the complementarities of human and machine intelligence. Visit his home page.

His ongoing research builds on representations of probability and utility, and centers on identifying ideal actions under uncertainty and bounded informational, computational, and cognitive resources. Beyond curiosity-driven research on foundations of machine perception, learning, and reasoning, he has been excited about building real-world systems that provide value to people, organizations, and society, working in multiple areas, including human-computer interaction, information retrieval, healthcare, transportation, operating systems, and aerospace.

See the Microsoft Research home page as a starting point for browsing through projects, events, and people and contact information for the Microsoft Research lab at Redmond—and other Microsoft labs in the United States and throughout the world.

Charles Isbell, Georgia Institute of Technology

Charles IsbellDr. Charles Isbell received his B.S. in Computer Science from Georgia Tech and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from MIT. After four years at AT&T Labs/Research, he returned to Georgia Tech to join the faculty of the College of Computing. Charles’ research interests are varied, but he focuses on building autonomous agents that engage in life-long learning in the presence of thousands of other intelligent agents, including humans. His work has been featured in the popular media, as well as in technical collections. Charles also pursues reform in computing education. He was a developer of Threads, Georgia Tech’s structuring principle for computing curricula and one of the developers of Georgia Tech’s MOOC-supported Masters of Science in Computer Science, the first of its kind in the world. Recently, he has assumed the role of the Senior Associate Dean for the College.

Harold Javid, Microsoft Research

Harold JavidHarold Javid’s career spans industry and academia. After completing a PhD in EE from UIUC, Harold worked for small companies as electronics division manager and general manager developing real time embedded controls and industrial optimizers. In between, he worked in large companies including GE and Boeing as application engineer, researcher, and research manager. In 1998, after turning around a small company and then supporting its sale, he followed his heart back to his technical love—by joining Microsoft. In Microsoft Research, as director of academic outreach, he leads collaborations between Microsoft Research and universities in North America. One of Harold’s most fun responsibilities is as chief organizer of the Microsoft Research Faculty Summit. Harold is actively involved in service to the IEEE as a founding chair of the IEEE-CS Research Advisory Board and Division V director elect of the IEEE Board of Directors.

Carlos Jensen, Oregon State University

Carlos JensenCarlos Jensen is an associate professor in the School of EECS at Oregon State University. He is the Director of the Center for Applies Systems and Software (CASS), which includes the OSU Open Source Lab, home to over 160 medium and large open source projects like the Linux Foundation, Apache Foundation, and Drupal. His research is in the intersection of usability and software engineering; he and his students study how open source developers to produce great software, where they fail to, and what tools and techniques we can develop to help more projects be successful.

He is deeply engaged in developing experiential learning opportunities. Through partnerships with industry, government and open source foundations, CASS provides on-campus development, testing and devops jobs for 70+ students, mentored by 14 full-time staff. Our students help run critical open source infrastructure, develop emergency response systems for the Oregon DOT, and test next generation switches, all while gaining valuable hands-on experience.

Carlos Jensen received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the Georgia Institute of Technology (2005).

Jaeyeon Jung, Microsoft Research

Jaeyeon JungJaeyeon Jung is a researcher at Microsoft Research. Prior to joining Microsoft, she was a research scientist at Intel Labs Seattle (2007–2011) after a brief stint as a software architect at Mazu networks (2006–2007). She obtained her PhD from MIT in 2006. Her current research focuses on developing new technologies for protecting consumer privacy, particularly in the areas of mobile systems and emerging consumer devices for the home.

Yan Ke, Microsoft

Yan KeYan Ke is a principal software engineering manager in the Bing Experiences group, working on entity understanding and question answering. His team developed many of the ranking algorithms for the entity pane, carousel, and fact answer triggering. Previously, he developed the Web Index Discovery and Selection algorithms for Bing. Yan joined Microsoft in 2008 after graduating with his Ph.D. in Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, specializing in computer vision.

Brenden Kuerbis, Syracuse University

Brenden KuerbisBrenden Kuerbis is a postdoctoral researcher at Syracuse University’s School of Information Studies, where his work focuses on the governance of Internet identifiers. He is currently researching governance structures in securing Internet routing as part of a NSF Secure and Trustworthy Computing (SaTC) project. Kuerbis is a regular contributor to the Internet Governance Project (IGP), a leading source for coverage and analysis of the political economy of global Internet policy, which puts research expertise into practical action by participating directly in Internet governance debates and institutions. Kuerbis participates in ICANN’s Cross Community Working Group to develop an IANA transition proposal. His work has appeared in academic and popular press including International Studies Review, Telecommunications Policy, Info, Communications & Strategies, Washington Internet Daily, and Forbes. Kuerbis holds a Ph.D. in information studies from Syracuse University, an MBA, MSIT from University of Denver, and a B.A. in international affairs from the University of Colorado Boulder.

Monica Lam, Professor, Stanford University

Monica LamDr. Monica Lam has been a Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University since 1988. She received a BSc from University of British Columbia in 1980 and a PhD in Computer Science from Carnegie Mellon University in 1987. She is the Faculty Director of the Stanford MobiSocial Computing Laboratory. Her current research interests are in building an open and federated social computing infrastructure. She has worked in the areas of architecture, compiler optimization, software analysis to improve security, mobile and social computing. Lam is an ACM Fellow, received an NSF Young Investigator award in 1992, and has won a range of best paper awards from the ACM. She is a co-author of the “dragon book”, the most popular textbook in compilers. She is also the founding CEO of Omlet, a Stanford spinoff to create an open social platform.

Jaron Lanier, Microsoft Research

Jaron LanierJaron Lanier either coined or popularized the term “VR.” His primal startup VPL created the first commercial VR products, first avatars, first multi-person virtual world experiences, and initial prototypes of surgical simulation and other major applications. Lanier has helped spawn startups that were acquired by Oracle, Adobe, Google, and Pfizer. He is currently interdisciplinary scientist at Microsoft Research.

Both of his books (Who Owns the Future? and You Are Not a Gadget) have been international bestsellers and prominently hailed as among the most influential books of recent years. Lanier was awarded the 2014 Peace Prize of the German Book Trade, one of the highest and most visible cultural honors in Europe. He’s also received honorary PhDs and a lifetime career award from the IEEE.

Lanier is also a musician. He maintains one of the largest and most varied collections of actively played rare instruments in the world. He has performed with Philip Glass, Ornette Coleman, and many others.

Ed Lazowska, University of Washington

Ed LazowskaEd Lazowska holds the Bill & Melinda Gates Chair in Computer Science & Engineering at the University of Washington, where his research and teaching concern the design, implementation, and analysis of high performance computing and communication systems, and, more recently, the techniques and technologies of data-intensive discovery. A long-time advocate for increasing participation in the field, he serves on the Executive Advisory Council of the National Center for Women & Information Technology, and on the National Research Council’s Committee on Women in Science, Engineering, and Medicine. He is a Member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Peter Lee, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research

Peter LeeDr. Peter Lee, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research, is responsible for Microsoft Research New Experiences and Technologies, or MSR NExT, an organization of world-class researchers, engineers, and designers devoted to creating potentially disruptive technologies for Microsoft and the world. While NExT will continue to advance the field of computing research and produce work with significant scholarly impact, its priority is developing technologies that benefit Microsoft and the world more broadly.

In this role, Lee oversees Microsoft Research Asia, Microsoft Research Technologies, FUSE Labs, and Microsoft Research Special Projects, along with several incubation project teams.

Prior to joining Microsoft, Lee has held key positions in both government and academia. His most recent position was at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), where he founded and directed a major technology office that supported research in computing and related areas in the social and physical sciences. One of the highlights of his work at DARPA was the DARPA Network Challenge, which mobilized millions of people worldwide in a hunt for red weather balloons — a unique experiment in social media and open innovation that fundamentally altered the thinking throughout the Department of Defense on the power of social networks.

Before DARPA, Lee served as head of Carnegie Mellon University’s nationally top-ranked computer science department. He also served as the university’s vice provost for research. At CMU, he carried out research in software reliability, program analysis, security, and language design. He is well-known for his co-development of proof-carrying code techniques for enhanced software security, and has tackled problems as diverse as programming for large-scale modular robotics systems and shape analysis for C programs.

Lee is a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and serves the research community at the national level, including policy contributions to the President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology and membership on both the National Research Council’s Computer Science and Telecommunications Board and the Advisory Council of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate of the National Science Foundation. He was the former chair of the Computing Research Association and has testified before both the US House Science and Technology Committee and the US Senate Commerce Committee.

Lee holds a Ph.D. in computer and communication sciences from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and bachelor’s degrees in mathematics and computer sciences, also from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

Rustan Leino, Microsoft Research

Rustan LeinoRustan Leino is Principal Researcher in the Research in Software Engineering (RiSE) group at Microsoft Research, Redmond, and Visiting Professor in the Department of Computing at Imperial College London. He is known for his work on programming methods and program verification tools, and is a world leader in building automated program verification tools. These include the languages and tools Dafny, Chalice, Jennisys, Spec#, Boogie, Houdini, ESC/Java, and ESC/Modula-3.

Prior to Microsoft Research, Leino worked at DEC/Compaq SRC. He received his PhD from Caltech (1995), before which he designed and wrote object-oriented software as a technical lead in the Windows NT group at Microsoft. Leino collects thinking puzzles on a popular web page and hosts the Verification Corner channel on YouTube. In his spare time, he plays music and, recently having ended his tenure as cardio exercise class instructor, is trying to learn to dance.

Fei-Fei Li, Associate Professor, Stanford University

Fei-Fei LiFei-Fei Li is an Associate Professor in the Computer Science Department at Stanford, and the Director of the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Lab and the Stanford Vision Lab. Her research areas are in machine learning, computer vision and cognitive and computational neuroscience, with an emphasis on Big Data analysis. Dr. Fei-Fei Li has published more than 100 scientific articles in top-tier journals and conferences, including Nature, PNAS, Journal of Neuroscience, CVPR, ICCV, NIPS, ECCV, IJCV, IEEE-PAMI, etc. Research from Fei-Fei’s lab have been featured in New York Times, New Scientists and a number of popular press magazines and newspapers. Dr. Fei-Fei Li obtained her B.A. degree in physics from Princeton in 1999 with High Honors, and her PhD degree in electrical engineering from California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in 2005. Dr. Fei-Fei Li is a recipient of the 2014 IBM Faculty Fellow Award, 2011 Alfred Sloan Faculty Award, 2012 Yahoo Labs FREP award, 2009 NSF CAREER award, the 2006 Microsoft Research New Faculty Fellowship, and a number of Google Research awards.

Michael Littman, Professor of Computer Science, Brown University

Michael LittmannMichael Littman works mainly in reinforcement learning, but has done work in machine learning, game theory, computer networking, partially observable Markov decision process solving, computer solving of analogy problems and other areas. He is currently a professor of computer science at Brown University. Before graduate school, Littman worked with Thomas Landauer at Bellcore and was granted a patent for one of the earliest systems for cross-language information retrieval. Littman received his Ph.D. in computer science from Brown University in 1996. From 1996 to 1999, he was a professor at Duke University. During his time at Duke, he worked on an automated crossword solver PROVERB, which won an Outstanding Paper Award in 1999 from AAAI and competed in the American Crossword Puzzle Tournament. From 2000 to 2002, he worked at AT&T. From 2002 to 2012, he was a professor at Rutgers University; he chaired the department from 2009 to 2012. In summer 2012 he returned to Brown University as a full professor.

Ben Livshits, Microsoft Research

Ben LivshitsBen Livshits is a research scientist at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, and an affiliate professor at the University of Washington. Originally from St. Petersburg, Russia, he received a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science and Math from Cornell University in 1999, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from Stanford University in 2002 and 2006, respectively. Dr. Livshits’ research interests include application of sophisticated static and dynamic analysis Techniques to finding errors in programs.

Ben has published papers at PLDI, POPL, Oakland Security, Usenix Security, CCS, SOSP, ICSE, FSE, and many other venues. He is known for his work in software reliability and especially tools to improve software security, with a primary focus on approaches to finding buffer overruns in C programs and a variety of security vulnerabilities (cross-site scripting, SQL injections, etc.) in web-based applications. He is the author of several dozen academic papers and patents. Lately, he has been focusing on topics ranging from security and privacy to crowdsourcing an augmented reality. Ben generally does not speak of himself in the third person.

Ratul Mahajan, Microsoft Research

Ratul MahajanRatul Mahajan is a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and an Affiliate Professor at the University of Washington. His research interests include all aspects of networked systems. His current work focuses on network verification and optical networks, and his past work spans software-defined networking, Internet routing and measurements, incentive-compatible protocol design, vehicular and wireless networks, and connected homes. He has published over 50 papers in top-tier venues such as SIGCOMM, SOSP, MobiCom, and CHI. He is a winner of the ACM SIGCOMM Test of Time award, ACM SIGCOMM Rising Star award, the William R. Bennett prize, the SIGCOMM best paper award, and Microsoft Research Graduate Fellowship.

Sharad Malik, Princeton University

Sharad MalikSharad Malik received the B. Tech. degree in Electrical Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi in 1985 and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1987 and 1990 respectively. Currently he is the George Van Ness Lothrop Professor of Engineering at Princeton University and the chair of the Department of Electrical Engineering. Previously he served as the director of the Keller Center for Innovation in Engineering Education at Princeton University (2006-2011) and the director of the multi-university Gigascale Systems Research Center (2009-2012).

Malik’s research focuses on design methodology and design automation for computing systems. His research in functional timing analysis and propositional satisfiability has been widely used in industrial electronic design automation tools.

He has received the DAC Award for the most cited paper in the 50-year history of the conference (2013), the CAV Award for fundamental contributions to the development of high-performance Boolean satisfiability solvers (2009), the ICCAD Ten Year Retrospective Most Influential Paper Award (2011), the Princeton University President’s Award for Distinguished Teaching (2009), as well as several other research and teaching awards. In 2009 he received the IIT Delhi Distinguished Alumni Award. He is a fellow of the IEEE and ACM.

Kathryn S. McKinley, Microsoft Research

Kathryn MckinleyKathryn S. McKinley is a principal researcher at Microsoft. She was previously an Endowed Professor of Computer Science at The University of Texas at Austin and received her PhD, MS, and BA from Rice University. Her research interests span programming language implementation, architecture, security, performance, and energy. She and her collaborators have produced widely used tools: the DaCapo Java Benchmarks, TRIPS Compiler, Hoard memory manager, MMTk garbage collector toolkit, and the Immix garbage collector. Her awards include the 2012 ACM SIGPLAN Programming Languages Software Award, the 2011 ACM SIGPLAN Distinguished Service Award, Best & Most Influential awards (ASPLOS, OOPSLA, ICS, SIGMETRICS), IEEE Top Picks, and CACM Research Highlights. Her service includes program chair for ASPLOS ’04, PACT ’05, PLDI ’07, ISMM’12, and CGO’13; editor-in-chief of ACM TOPLAS (2007-2010); DARPA ISAT member (2012–present), CRA Board member (2012-present), and CRA-W co-chair (2011–2014). Dr. McKinley was honored to testify to the House Science Committee (Feb. 14, 2013). She has graduated 18 PhD students. She is an IEEE Fellow and an ACM Fellow.

Tao Mei, Microsoft Research

Tao MeiTao is a Lead Researcher with Microsoft Research, Beijing, China. His current research interests include multimedia information retrieval and computer vision. He has authored or co-authored over 100 papers in journals and conferences, 10 book chapters, and edited three books. He holds 13 granted U.S. patents and more than 20 in pending. Tao was the recipient of several paper awards from prestigious multimedia journals and conferences, including the IEEE T-CSVT (2013) and T-MM (2014) Best Paper Awards, and the ACM Multimedia Best Paper Awards (2007 and 2009). He is an Associate Editor of IEEE Trans. on Multimedia and ACM/Springer Multimedia Systems, and a Senior Member of IEEE and ACM. He received the B.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, China, in 2001 and 2006, respectively.

Margaret Mitchell, Microsoft Research

Margaret MitchellMargaret Mitchell is a researcher in Microsoft’s NLP Research Group, working on grounded language generation. Before joining Microsoft, she was a postdoctoral researcher at The Johns Hopkins University Center of Excellence, where she worked on semantic role labeling and sentiment analysis using graphical models.

Margaret received her PhD in Computer Science from the natural language generation (NLG) group at the University of Aberdeen. As a student, she focused on how to naturally refer to visible, everyday objects, blending research in vision, language, statistics, and cognitive science.

Margaret also spent several years as a visiting scholar at the Center for Spoken Language Understanding, part of OHSU, in Portland, Oregon, where she worked on understanding the syntactic and phonetic characteristics in the language of people with neurological disorders.

Ray Mooney, University of Texas at Austin

Ray MooneyRaymond J. Mooney is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Texas at Austin. He received his Ph.D. in 1988 from the University of Illinois at Urbana/Champaign. He is an author of over 150 published research papers, primarily in the areas of machine learning and natural language processing. He was the President of the International Machine Learning Society from 2008–2011, program co-chair for AAAI 2006, general chair for HLT-EMNLP 2005, and co-chair for ICML 1990. He is a Fellow of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Association for Computational Linguistics, and the recipient of best paper awards from AAAI-96, KDD-04, ICML-05 and ACL-07.

Todd Mytkowicz, Microsoft Research

Todd MytkowiczTodd Mytkowicz is a researcher at Microsoft Research. His research focuses on creating abstractions that help programmers easily express complex problems and yet are sufficiently constrained to deliver efficient and powerful implementations. Mytkowicz has a PhD in computer science from the University of Colorado at Boulder and enjoys mountain biking, skiing, and spending time with his family. Contact him at toddm@microsoft.com.

Arvind Narayanan, Princeton University

Arvind NarayananArvind Narayanan (Ph.D. 2009) is an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at Princeton. He studies information privacy and security and has a side-interest in technology policy. His research has shown that data anonymization is broken in fundamental ways, for which he jointly received the 2008 Privacy Enhancing Technologies Award. Narayanan leads the Princeton Web Transparency and Accountability project that aims to uncover how companies are collecting and using our personal information. He also studies the security and stability of Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies.

Narayanan is an affiliated faculty member at the Center for Information Technology Policy at Princeton and an affiliate scholar at Stanford Law School’s Center for Internet and Society.

Carolyn Nguyen, Microsoft

Carolyn NguyenM-H. Carolyn Nguyen is a Director in Microsoft’s Telecommunications and Internet Governance Group, focused on policy issues related to Internet governance through engagements with relevant stakeholders globally. Her past activities have included policy initiatives on privacy, security, open/big data, the internet of things, intelligent systems, and their effects on existing social, economic, and policy frameworks. She has worked at the intersection of these disciplines, developing an evidence base to encourage more holistic approaches to policy through collaboration with multidisciplinary researchers and other experts, including the Digital Enlightenment Forum, the World Economic Forum, and Microsoft Research.

Prior to joining Microsoft in 2011, Carolyn held positions with Research in Motion, Avaya Communications, Lucent Technologies, and Bell Laboratories. Carolyn received her BSEE from Princeton University, MEng from Cornell University, and PhD from Columbia University, all in electrical engineering. She also completed Executive Programs at Harvard Business School and London Business School.

Cathy Palmer, Microsoft Research

Cathy PalmerCathy Palmer is principal research program manager for Microsoft Research. She provides leadership and support for strategic research initiatives across Microsoft Research and Microsoft product teams. Her expertise spans operating systems, networking, and distributed systems, focusing currently on cloud computing. She received her PhD from the University of Washington and joined Tera Computer Company (now Cray, Inc.) where she was a kernel OS developer for the MTA, a multithreaded high performance parallel computer. She also served as software project leader for a large-scale multiprocessor system for the US Department of Energy, ranked Top 10 on the Top500. She joined the Microsoft High Performance Team in 2006, where she served as lead program manager responsible for system administration for multiple product releases of the Microsoft HPC Server and owned the job scheduling for Azure HPC Scheduler. She joined Microsoft Research in 2012, focusing on initiating and enabling strong research collaborations between Microsoft Research and Microsoft engineering.

Ken Perlin, New York University

Ken PerlinKen Perlin, a professor in the Department of Computer Science at New York University, directs the NYU Games For Learning Institute, and a participating faculty member in the NYU Media and Games Network (MAGNET). He was also founding director of the Media Research Laboratory and director of the NYU Center for Advanced Technology. His research interests include graphics, animation, augmented and mixed reality, user interfaces, science education and multimedia. He received an Academy Award for Technical Achievement from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for his noise and turbulence procedural texturing techniques, which are widely used in feature films and television, as well as the 2008 ACM/SIGGRAPH Computer Graphics Achievement Award, the TrapCode award for achievement in computer graphics research, the NYC Mayor’s award for excellence in Science and Technology and the Sokol award for outstanding Science faculty at NYU, and a Presidential Young Investigator Award from the National Science Foundation. Dr. Perlin currently serves on the program committee of the AAAS. He was general chair of the UIST2010 conference, and has been a featured artist at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Sundeep Rangan, New York University

Sundeep RanganDr. Sundeep Rangan received the B.A.Sc. at the University of Waterloo, Canada and the M.Sc. and Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley, all in Electrical Engineering. He has held postdoctoral appointments at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and Bell Labs. In 2000, he co-founded (with four others) Flarion Technologies, a spin-off of Bell Labs that developed Flash OFDM, the first cellular OFDM data system. Flarion grew to over 150 employees with trials worldwide. In 2006, Flarion was acquired by Qualcomm Technologies. Dr. Rangan was a director of Engineering at Qualcomm involved in OFDM infrastructure products. He joined the ECE department at Poly in 2010. His research interests are in wireless communications, signal processing, information theory, and control theory.

Charles Rich, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Charles RichCharles Rich is a Professor of Computer Science and a member of the associated faculty of the Interactive Media and Game Development and the Robotics Engineering programs at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. He was previously Distinguished Research Scientist and a founding member of Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories. Rich earned his PhD at the MIT Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, where he was a founder and director of the Programmer’s Apprentice project. He is a Fellow and past Councilor of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, a Senior Member of the IEEE, as well as having served as chair of the 1992 International Conference on Principles of Knowledge Representation and Reasoning, co-chair of the 1998 National Conference on Artificial Intelligence, program co-chair of the 2004 and general co-chair of the 2010 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, and program co-chair of the 2011 International Conference on the Foundations of Digital Games.

Matthew Richardson, Microsoft Research

Matthew RichardsonMatthew Richardson is a principal researcher at Microsoft Research. His research includes work on natural language processing, machine learning, data mining, and extracting knowledge from large scale datasets such as query logs. His current work is focused on question answering and machine comprehension. He received his B.S. from Caltech, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Washington in 2004. While at Microsoft, he has published papers at a wide variety of conferences, including EMNLP, AAAI, KDD, SIGIR, and WWW, won a best paper award at CHI2011, co-organized the SIGIR 2009 workshop on IR for advertising, and has served on 50 program committees.

Dan Roth, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Dan RothDan Roth is a Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the Beckman Institute at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and a University of Illinois Scholar. He is the director of the DHS funded Center for Multimodal Information Access & Synthesis (MIAS) and has faculty positions also at the Statistics, Linguistics and ECE Departments and at the graduate School of Library and Information Science.

Roth is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the Association of Computing Machinery (ACM), the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI), and the Association of Computational Linguistics (ACL), for his contributions to Machine Learning and to Natural Language Processing.

He has published broadly in machine learning, natural language processing, knowledge representation and reasoning and learning theory, and has developed advanced machine learning based tools for natural language applications that are being used widely by the research community. Prof. Roth has given keynote talks in major conferences, including AAAI, The Conference of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence; EMNLP, The Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing, ECML & PKDD, the European Conference on Machine Learning and the Principles and Practice of Knowledge Discovery in Databases, and EACL, the European Conference of Computational Linguistics. He has also presented several tutorials in universities and conferences including at ACL and the European ACL and has won several teaching and best paper awards.

Roth is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research (JAIR) and has served on the editorial board of several of the major journals in his research areas. He was the program chair of AAAI’11, ACL’03 and CoNLL’02 and serves regularly as an area chair and senior program committee member in the major conferences in his research areas.

Prof. Roth got his B.A. Summa cum laude in Mathematics from the Technion, Israel and his Ph.D. in Computer Science from Harvard University in 1995.

Aaditeshwar Seth, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi

Aaditeshwar SethAaditeshwar Seth is an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science at IIT Delhi, where he runs the ACT4D (Appropriate Computing Technologies for Development) research group. He graduated with a PhD degree from the University of Waterloo in Canada in 2008, and completed his B.Tech from IIT Kanpur in 2002. Aaditeshwar is passionate about building technologies for social development. He won the Knight News Challenge award in 2008 to start an organization, Gram Vaani, which builds low-cost voice-based systems for community media in rural areas. Gram Vaani’s technologies and work done by Aadi’s students are now in use by over 100 developmental organizations in India, Africa, Afghanistan, and Pakistan, where collectively more than 2 million people have directly touched their platforms. Several elements of their work have also been adopted by government departments in India for scaleup, and have influenced the use of ICTs for development within many international aid and development organizations.

Harry Shum, Executive Vice President, Technology and Research, Microsoft

Harry ShumFormer managing director of Microsoft Research Asia, Dr. Harry Shum, after leading Bing product development for several years as a Corporate Vice President, has taken the new role of Microsoft Executive Vice President, Technology and Research.

Dr. Shum is an Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Fellow and an Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Fellow. He served on the editorial board of the International Journal of Computer Vision, and was a Program Chair of the International Conference of Computer Vision (ICCV) 2007. Dr. Shum has published more than 100 papers in computer vision, computer graphics, pattern recognition, statistical learning, and robotics. He holds more than 50 U.S. patents.

Dr. Shum joined Microsoft Research in 1996 where he worked in Redmond, WA as a researcher on computer vision and computer graphics. In 1999, Shum moved to Beijing to help start Microsoft Research China (later renamed Microsoft Research Asia). His tenure there began as a research manager and subsequently moved up to Assistant Managing Director, Managing Director of Microsoft Research Asia, Distinguished Engineer, and Corporate Vice President. In 2007, Shum became Microsoft Corporate Vice President responsible for Bing product development. In 2013, he took on the responsibilities of Microsoft Executive Vice President including oversight of Microsoft Research.

Dr. Shum received a doctorate in robotics from the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University. In his spare time, he enjoys playing basketball, rooting for the Pittsburgh Steelers, and spending quality time with his family.

Yang Song, Microsoft Research

Yang SongDr. Yang Song is a Researcher at the Internet Services and Research Center (ISRC), Microsoft Research Redmond. He has been with Microsoft Research since 2009. His research interests include information retrieval, machine learning, data mining and user modeling. He has published over 40 scientific research works on international conferences, journals and books. He also holds five US patents. Dr. Song received his Ph.D. degree from Department of Computer Science and Engineering, the Pennsylvania State University, and B.S. degree from Department of Computer Science, Zhejiang University, China.

Krysta Svore, Microsoft Research

Krysta SvoreDr. Krysta Svore is a Senior Researcher at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Washington, where she manages the Quantum Architectures and Computation group. Svore’s research includes the development and implementation of quantum algorithms, including the design of a scalable, fault-tolerant software architecture for translating a high-level quantum program into a low-level, device-specific quantum implementation, and the study of quantum error correction codes and noise thresholds. She has also developed machine-learning methods for web applications, including ranking, classification, and summarization algorithms. Dr. Svore received an ACM Best of 2013 Notable Article award. In 2010, she was a member of the winning team of the Yahoo! Learning to Rank Challenge. She received her Ph.D. in Computer Science with highest distinction from Columbia University in 2006 and her B.A. from Princeton University in Mathematics and French in 2001. She is a Senior Member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM), serves as a representative for the Academic Alliance of the National Center for Women and Information Technology (NCWIT), and is an active member of the American Physical Society (APS).

Jie Tang, Tsinghua University, China

Jie TangJie Tang is an associate professor with Department of Computer Science and Technology, Tsinghua University. His interests include social network analysis, data mining, and machine learning. He published more than 100 journal/conference papers and holds 10 patents. He served as PC Co-Chair of WSDM’15, ASONAM’15, ADMA’11, SocInfo’12, KDD-CUP Co-Chair of KDD’15, Poster Co-Chair of KDD’14, Workshop Co-Chair of KDD’13, Local Chair of KDD’12, Publication Co-Chair of KDD’11, and as the PC member of more than 50 international conferences. He is the principal investigator of National High-tech R&D Program (863), NSFC project, Chinese Young Faculty Research Funding, National 985 funding, and international collaborative projects with Minnesota University, IBM, Google, Nokia, Sogou, etc. He leads the project Arnetminer.org for academic social network analysis and mining, which has attracted millions of independent IP accesses from 220 countries/regions in the world. He was honored with the Newton Advanced Scholarship Award, CCF Young Scientist Award, NSFC Excellent Young Scholar, and IBM Innovation Faculty Award.

Kristin Tolle, Microsoft Research

Kristin TolleDr. Tolle is the Director of the Data Science Initiative in Microsoft Research Outreach, Redmond, WA. Since joining Microsoft in 2000, Dr. Tolle has acquired numerous patents and worked for several product teams including the Natural Language Group, Visual Studio, and the Microsoft Office Excel Team. Since joining Microsoft Research’s outreach program in 2006, she has run several major initiatives from biomedical computing and environmental science to more traditional computer and information science programs around natural user interactions and data curation. She was also directed the development of the Microsoft Translator Hub and the Environmental Science Services Toolkit. Dr. Tolle is one of the editors and authors of one of the earliest books on data science, The Fourth Paradigm: Data Intensive Scientific Discovery. Her current focus is develop an outreach program to engage with academics on data science in general and more specifically around using data to create meaningful and useful user experiences across devices platforms.

Matthias Troyer, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich

Matthias TroyerMatthias Troyer is professor of computational physics at ETH Zurich and consultant for the quantum computing activities at Microsoft Research. He is a recipient of an ERC Advanced Grant of the European Research Council, a Fellow of the American Physical Society and a Trustee of the Aspen Center for Physics. His research activities center on large scale simulations of quantum systems, development of new simulation algorithms and high performance computing. His love for new tech gadgets has led him from supercomputing to quantum devices. He has tested quantum random number generators, validated analog quantum simulators for materials (one of the scientific breakthroughs of the year 2010 according to Science magazine), explored the computational capabilities of the controversial devices built by D-Wave Systems, and is now working on quantum algorithms for real-world applications. Besides his research on quantum physics he is collaborating with an interdisciplinary team of colleagues towards the modeling and simulations of island ecosystems.

Andries van Dam, Brown University

Andy van DamAndries van Dam (Andy) has been on Brown’s faculty since 1965, and was one of the Computer Science Department’s co-founders and its first Chairman, from 1979 to 1985. He was a Principal Investigator and was the Director from 1996 to 1998 in the NSF Science and Technology Center for Graphics and Visualization, a research consortium including Brown, Caltech, Cornell, North Carolina (Chapel Hill), and the University of Utah. He served as Brown’s first Vice President for Research from 2002 to 2006.

Lucy Vanderwende, Microsoft Research

Lucy VanderwendeLucy Vanderwende’s research focuses on text understanding. She is deeply involved with developing MindNet, a method for automatically acquiring semantic information; when extracting from dictionaries, much of this information might be considered common sense. Lucy has been involved in projects to extract information from electronic health records, for phenotype determination and prediction, where identifying the truth value of the sentence contributes to greater accuracy. Further, Lucy has worked with Sumit Basu on various projects of Question Generation, primarily for the purpose of generating quizzes from arbitrary text to support self-motivated learning. Lucy has been at Microsoft Research since 1992 and Affiliate Faculty at University of Washington Department of Biomedical Health Informatics since 2011.

Benjamin Van Durme, Johns Hopkins University

Benjamin Van DurmeBenjamin Van Durme is the lead of Natural Language Understanding research at the Johns Hopkins University Human Language Technology Center of Excellence (HLTCOE), as well as an assistant research professor in both Computer Science and Cognitive Science at Johns Hopkins University. Between the HLTCOE, his small army of PhD students, and affiliated post-doctoral researchers, research areas covered include: information extraction and knowledge base population, streaming and randomized algorithms in HLT, topic modeling, author attribute prediction in social media, educational NLP, and various aspects of computational semantics.

George Varghese, Microsoft Research

George VargheseGeorge Varghese obtained his Ph.D. in 1992 from MIT. He worked from 1993-1999 at Washington University, and from 1999 to 2012 at UCSD, both as professor of computer science. He won the ONR Young Investigator Award in 1996, and was elected to be a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) in 2002. His book, Network Algorithmics, was published in December 2004 by Morgan-Kaufman. In May 2004, he co-founded NetSift Inc., which was acquired by Cisco Systems in 2005. He joined Microsoft Research in 2012. He has received the 2014 ACM SIGCOMM Award, the 2014 IEEE Koji Kobayashi Computers and Communications Award, and the 2015 Distinguished Alumni Award from IIT Bombay.

Manuela M. Veloso, Carnegie Mellon University

Manuela VelosoManuela M. Veloso is the Herbert A. Simon University Professor in the Computer Science Department at Carnegie Mellon University. She researches in artificial intelligence and robotics. She founded and directs the coral research laboratory, for the study of autonomous agents that collaborate, observe, reason, act, and learn.

Professor Veloso is IEEE Fellow, AAAS Fellow, AAAI Fellow, and the past President of AAAI and RoboCup. Professor Veloso and her students have worked with a variety of autonomous robots, including mobile service robots and soccer robots. The CoBot service robots have autonomously navigated for more than 1,000km in our multi-floor office buildings. See www.cs.cmu.edu/~mmv for further information, including publications.

Alex Wade, Microsoft Research

Alex WadeAlex Wade is Director of Scholarly Communication at Microsoft Research. He currently focused on Microsoft Academic, spanning areas of knowledge acquisition, knowledge representation, intentionality, dialog systems, semantic search and intelligent agents. During his career at Microsoft, Alex has managed the enterprise search and taxonomy management systems, delivered Windows Search for multiple OS releases, and has implemented an Open Access policy governing Microsoft Research’s scholarly output. Prior to joining Microsoft, he worked in the library systems of the University of Washington, the University of Michigan and the University of California at Berkeley. Alex holds a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from U.C. Berkeley, and a Masters of Librarianship degree from the University of Washington.

Kuansan Wang, Microsoft Research

Kuansan WangKuansan Wang is a Principal Researcher and Director of Internet Service Research Center and Conversational System Research Center at Microsoft Research in Redmond where he is currently conducting research in web search, large scale data mining, dialog systems and web-scale natural language processing. He joined the Speech Technology Group in Microsoft Research in 1998, and has been the software architect for Speech Server 2004, Microsoft Response Point 2007 and co-authored six ISO/ECMA/W3C standards. Kuansan has a BS, MS from National Taiwan University and PhD from U of Maryland, College Park, all in Electrical Engineering.

Nathan Wiebe, Microsoft Research

Nathan WiebeNathan Wiebe received his PhD in 2011 from the University of Calgary studying quantum simulation and adiabatic quantum computing. He then accepted a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Waterloo before accepting a post-doctoral researcher position at Microsoft Research in 2013. His current work focuses on quantum machine learning, quantum simulation, quantum circuit design, and quantum device characterization.

Jeannette Wing, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research

Jeannette WingJeannette Wing joined Microsoft Research in January 2013 after holding positions in academia and government, most recently at Carnegie Mellon University and the National Science Foundation (NSF). From 2007 to 2010, she served as assistant director of the Computer and Information Science and Engineering Directorate at the NSF, where she led the directorate that funds academic computer science research in the United States. Her areas of expertise are in trustworthy computing, formal methods, concurrent and distributed systems, programming languages, and software engineering.

Wing was on the faculty at the University of Southern California for two years before joining the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. As a student, she worked at Bell Laboratories and Xerox PARC. She spent sabbaticals at MIT and Microsoft Research Redmond. She received the CRA Distinguished Service Award in 2011 and the SIGSOFT Retrospective Paper Award in 2012. Wing is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the Association for Computing Machinery, and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers.

Wing received her bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Geoffrey G. Xie, Naval Postgraduate School

Geoffrey XieGeoffrey G. Xie is a professor and associated chair of the computer science department, Naval Postgraduate School. He received the BS degree in computer science from Fudan University, China, and the PhD degree in computer sciences from the University of Texas at Austin. He was a visiting scholar in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University from 2003 to 2004, and the Computer Laboratory of the University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from 2010 to 2011. He has published more than 70 articles in various areas of networking. He co-chaired the ACM SIGCOMM Internet Network Management Workshop in 2007. He won the best paper award at the 2007 IEEE ICNP conference and the 2011 IEEE Fred W. Ellersick Award. His current research interests include formal network analysis, routing design and theories, and abstraction driven design of enterprise networks.

Scott Wen-tau Yih, Microsoft Research

Scott Wen-tau YihScott Wen-tau Yih is a senior researcher at Microsoft Research Redmond. His research interests include natural language processing, machine learning and information retrieval. Yih’s current work focuses on continuous semantic representations using neural networks and matrix/tensor decomposition methods, with applications in lexical semantics, knowledge base embedding and question answering. Yih received the best paper award from CoNLL-2011 and has served as area chairs (HLT-NAACL-12, ACL-14) and program co-chairs (CEAS-09, CoNLL-14) in recent years. Yih received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, before joining Microsoft Research.

Richard Zemel, University of Toronto

Richard ZemelRichard Zemel is a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Toronto, where he has been a faculty member since 2000. Prior to that, he was an Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Psychology at the University of Arizona, and was a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Salk Institute and at Carnegie Mellon University. He received the B.Sc. degree in History & Science from Harvard University in 1984, and a Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Toronto in 1993. He has received several awards and honors, including a Young Investigator Award from the Office of Naval Research, and six Dean’s Excellence Awards at the University of Toronto. He is a Fellow of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research, and a member of the NIPS Advisory Board. His research interests include topics in machine learning, vision, and neural coding. His recent research focuses on structured output models, image-text analysis, and fairness.

Luke Zettlemoyer, University of Washington

Luke ZettlemoyerLuke Zettlemoyer is an assistant professor in computer science and engineering at the University of Washington. He does research in natural language processing, with a focus on empirical computational semantics. Honors include paper awards at UAI and ACL, selection to the DARPA CSSG, an NSF CAREER Award, and an Allen Distinguished Investigator Award. Luke received his PhD from MIT and was a postdoc at the University of Edinburgh.

Xinyu Zhang, University of Wisconsin Madison

Xinyu ZhangXinyu Zhang is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received the B.E. degree in 2005 from Harbin Institute of Technology, China; the M.S. degree in 2007 from the University of Toronto, Canada; and the Ph.D. degree in 2012 from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. His research interest lies in designing and implementing protocols that improve the capacity, interoperability, and energy-efficiency of wireless networks. He is a recipient of ACM MobiCom Best Paper Award in 2011 and NSF CAREER Award in 2014.

Zhengyou Zhang, Microsoft Research

Zhengyou ZhangZhengyou Zhang is a principal researcher with Microsoft Research, Redmond, Washington, and the research manager of the Multimedia, Interaction, and Experiences group. Before joining Microsoft Research in March 1998, he was with INRIA (French National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Control), France, for 11 years and was a senior research scientist from 1991. From 1996-1997, he spent a one-year sabbatical as an Invited Researcher with the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR), Kyoto, Japan.

He is an IEEE Fellow, and an ACM Fellow. He is the Founding Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Autonomous Mental Development, and serves as an Associate Editor of several journals. He has been on the program committees for numerous international conferences in the areas of computer vision, audio and speech signal processing, multimedia, human-computer interaction, and autonomous mental development. He received the IEEE Helmholtz Test of Time Award at ICCV 2013 for his paper published in 1999 on camera calibration, now known as Zhang’s method.

Heather Zheng, University of California Santa Barbara

Heather ZhengHeather Zheng received Ph.D. (1999) and M.S.E. (1998) degrees in Electrical and Computer Engineering from the University of Maryland, College Park and a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Xi’an Jiaotong University, China (1995). Zheng is currently an associate professor of Computer Science at UC Santa Barbara where she leads the LINK Lab, part of the Next Generation Networking Group. Before coming to UCSB in 2005, she spent six years in industry research positions at Bell-Labs, Murray Hill, and Microsoft Research Asia. In 2006, her work on Cognitive Radios was featured in MIT Technology Review as a Top-10 Emerging Technology, and she recently became a fellow of the World Technology Network. In 2005, she was one of MIT Technology Review’s Top 35 Innovators under the age of 35 for her work on cognitive radios. Zheng received Bell Laboratories President’s Gold Award from Lucent Bell-Labs (2002), and the George Harhalakis Outstanding Graduate Student Award from Institute of System Research, University of Maryland, College Park (1998–1999). She was admitted to the highly gifted class of Xi’an Jiaotong University, China at age of 15, and graduated with the highest honors.

Lidong Zhou, Microsoft Research

Lidong ZhouLidong Zhou is a Principal Researcher and Research Manager of the Systems Research Group in Microsoft Research Redmond. Previously, he managed the System Research Group of Microsoft Research Asia from 2008 to 2012 and was a researcher at Microsoft Research Silicon Valley from 2002 to 2008. His main research interest is in the area of distributed systems. He holds a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell University.

Larry Zitnick, Microsoft Research

Larry ZitnickC. Lawrence Zitnick is a principal researcher in the Interactive Visual Media group at Microsoft Research, and is an affiliate associate professor at the University of Washington. He is interested in a broad range of topics related to visual object recognition, language and artificial intelligence. He developed the PhotoDNA technology used by Microsoft, Facebook, Google, and various law enforcement agencies to combat illegal imagery on the web. Before joining Microsoft Research, he received the PhD degree in robotics from Carnegie Mellon University in 2003.

Ben Zorn, Microsoft Research

Ben ZornBen Zorn is a Research Manager and Principal Researcher, co-managing the Research in Software Engineering (RiSE) group, a group of over 30 researchers and developers working on programming languages and software engineering in Microsoft Research, Redmond. After receiving a PhD in Computer Science from UC Berkeley in 1989, he served eight years on the Computer Science faculty at the University of Colorado in Boulder, receiving tenure and being promoted to Associate Professor in 1996. Dr. Zorn left the University of Colorado in 1998 to join Microsoft Research, where he currently works. His research interests include programming language design and implementation for reliability, security, and performance. Dr. Zorn has served as both Program Chair (1999) and General Chair (2010) of the PLDI conference, as an Associate Editor of the ACM journals Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems and Transactions on Architecture and Code Optimization. He has also served seven years as a Member-at-Large of the SIGPLAN Executive Committee and four years as a member of the ACM Software Systems Award Committee. He is currently a member of the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) Council, a committee of the Computing Research Association.

Research Showcase

Thursday, July 9 | 9:45 AM-1:00 PM

Artificial intelligence

Accurately predicting body fat, waist size, and BMI

Body measurements are important for health assessments and weight control. This project accurately obtains body measurements without measuring devices. Participants match their body type to a computer-generated image, and the system deduces their waist size and Body Mass Index (BMI).

Beyond A/B tests: multiworld testing as a service

We demonstrate a “decision service” built on multiworld testing, which can answer much more detailed questions than A/B testing can. Designed to interoperate with existing systems and scenarios, the service includes multiple consumable pieces and a standalone cloud service.

Deep models for automated melanoma diagnosis

Early detection of melanomas is crucial to clinical outcomes. Using deep probabilistic models trained on images of moles, our system distinguishes benign lesions from malignant tumors, surpassing the diagnostic ability of previous computational attempts and experienced dermatologists.

Feature discovery and exploration for interactive ML

Our platform promotes quick interaction between human teacher and learning machine. It uses an interactive loop, where users alternate between feature ideation to fix errors in the training set and exploration to discover new pockets of false positives and false negatives.

Fully articulated hand tracking

We present a real-time, articulated hand tracker that enables new possibilities for human-computer interaction. Our system accurately reconstructs complex hand poses, using only a single depth camera. It also allows for a high-degree of robustness, continually recovering from tracking failures.

Image captioning with near-human performance

People can look at a picture and immediately describe what is important. This project gives computers similar capabilities, combining the latest in deep neural network image processing with the latest approaches to language modeling to produce an automated captioning system.

SysSieve: turn user feedback to actionable insights

Microsoft customer support specialists handle issues captured by free-form and unstructured text input. SysSieve employs machine learning, natural language processing, information theory and ontology modeling to derive automated inference and insights from a range of free-form text.

Computing in society

Crypto-verified elections: reality in Texas

Learn how the STAR-Vote system will soon enable voters in Austin, Texas, to verify the accuracy of election results directly, without relying on election officials and system vendors. Oh, and it will save them money, too.

Eye Gaze wheelchair

Begun during the Microsoft Summer 2014 Hackathon, Eye Gaze technology strives to bring independent mobility to people with disabilities who cannot use a joystick.

Minecraft in education

Learn how Minecraft is being used in education. From math and science to humanities and history, Minecraft is empowering teachers and engaging students to create, collaborate and share.

Project Premonition: detecting emerging infectious diseases

Project Premonition seeks to detect pathogens before they make people sick. It uses drones and robotic traps to capture mosquitoes, which are potent disease vectors, and then detects pathogens by gene sequencing the collected mosquitoes and computationally searching for pathogens.

qCards: low-cost audience polling using computer vision

We present a low-cost alternative to electronic response systems such as i>clicker. Our system uses paper cards for voting and a low-cost smartphone or a laptop plus webcam to capture and process votes.

Devices

Be there: 3D audio virtual presence

Using 3D scans of your head, we synthesize your personal head-related transfer function. Then you don headphones and stand before of a pair of large screens, experiencing sights and 3D sounds as if you were there.

Multi-touch interaction using dynamic chord gestures

DynaChord allows the use of dynamic, hierarchical chord gestures to interact with a large multi-touch display. We show how DynaChord’s in-context visual feedback and feedforward help the user learn the gestures and actively assist in their performance.

Presenter Camera: a virtual camera for best presentation

See how our Presenter Camera addresses the bane of presentation videos: either you see the presenter but not the digital contents, or you watch the stream of the digital contents, but you don’t know what the presenter refers to.

Rapid prototyping with TouchDevelop

Devices are everywhere: from those we use, like phones and tablets, to those we can program, including Arduinos and IoT sensors. TouchDevelop now supports the creation of device firmware—so even beginners can use devices to program devices.

RoomAlive toolkit

The RoomAlive Toolkit is an open-source software development kit that enables developers to create new immersive augmented reality experiences by calibrating a network of multiple Kinect sensors and video projectors.

Secure, anonymous and instant communication between phones and touch

We present a new technique for pairing devices using the phone’s camera and capacitive touch sensing. Our technique provides rapid, secure pairing with device tracking and targeted interactions, enabling a range of interactive functions.

Textile electronic touch sensor

We show designs that deliver multi-touch performance from a textile platform and demonstrate how these touch sensors offer unique functionality to next-generation electronic devices.

Engaging with Microsoft

Artificial intelligence at Microsoft

Learn about artificial intelligence research, applications (e.g., Hyperlapse) and datasets (e.g., MS COCO) that you can engage with, and see their impact in such Microsoft products as Bing, Cortana, Kinect, HoloLens, and Oxford.

Azure for Research and Azure Machine Learning

Amp up your research. Microsoft Azure for Research offers grants that enable big data computations in the cloud. Microsoft Azure Machine Learning makes it easy for the academic community to use machine learning technology for their research.

Data Science at Microsoft Research

Microsoft has products, tools and services that promote data science research, education and insights, and we’re eager to facilitate collaborations with the academic community by supporting technology programs and data. Learn what’s on the horizon in data science.

Open Source Software from Microsoft for Academics

Open source is a powerful way of advancing software development. Microsoft has open sourced cutting-edge research projects as well as such key software as .NET, and has classified it especially for academics. Often the software is cross platform, too.

Project Catapult: FPGA-based enhancement of server hardware

Project Catapult is a ground-breaking FPGA-based enhancement of server hardware that vastly improves the performance and speed of datacenter workloads. We will demonstrate its power by running workloads on both a standard server and a server enhanced with Catapult.

Cognitive Services

Cognitive Services offers an evolving portfolio of APIs and SDKs, enabling developers to add intelligent services to their solutions. The current portfolio includes services for facial recognition, speech, computer vision and natural language.

Research Fellowships

The Microsoft Research Fellowship Program provides financial support for students and early-career faculty, allowing them to focus on their research. Fellowships build lasting relationships between Microsoft Research and academic institutions.

Research Internships

Interns at Microsoft Research put theory into practice, while working with renowned researchers and networking with fellow PhD students from around the world. Microsoft Research Internship opportunities are available year-round at all our worldwide labs.

Academic Services

Academic Services is a suite of apps and services that will help researchers and students be more productive and stay current with their research domain and related areas.

What’s it like to work at Microsoft Research?

Learn about internship, fellowship and career opportunities that put you on the forefront of computer science research and technology development, let you see your work impact real-world applications and enable you to collaborate and network with researchers around the globe.

Research in action

Project Flashprog: data transformation by example

Project Flashprog develops technologies for extracting data from semi-structured documents into a relational table, which can be used for analysis or visualization tasks. An intuitive interface allows users to express their intent, explore the resulting program and tailor it to their needs.

Microsoft Research Computational Photography applications

The Microsoft Research Computational Photography Group uses computation to push the limits of photography, conducting early-stage research and turning promising research into applications. The demo will showcase some of our recently shipped applications and walk through the technology behind them.

NUIGraph: explore and display your data with touch

Big data offers immense potential for insights, but it can be challenging to interact with and analyze. By combining visualization and analytics, NUIGraph helps uncover answers even when we don’t know exactly what questions we could be asking.

Power Map

Power Map provides robust analytical tools for big data. From the familiar base of Excel, you can map data, discover new insights, and then create and share stories about that data.

Prediction Lab

An interactive platform that combines data from a variety of sources, Microsoft Prediction Lab enables people to produce and consume information about the present status and predicted outcomes of a wide range of market intelligence questions.

Microsoft Band: Reimagining personal healthcare

Built on years of research, testing, iterating and inventing, Microsoft Band represents an entirely new product category for the company. Using a security-enhanced cloud platform, Microsoft Band stores and analyzes personal health data, potentially transforming personal health and fitness. See how to use Microsoft Band SDK to write applications that communicate with the Band.

Removing the language barrier with Skype Translator

Incorporating the latest advances in machine learning, speech recognition and automatic translation, Skype Translator seeks to remove the last hurdle to global communication: the language barrier. See it in action and learn how it works.

Software

Code Hunt: exploring how programmers code

Code Hunt is an education game whose 140,000 participants have generated over 1.5M programs, which we can link to specific levels of expertise. Discover how coders code and how technology can make the process more accurate and less painful.

Madoko: create and share programmable documents

Madoko lets you write papers in advanced markdown and get both beautiful HTML and PDF output. It promotes collaborative editing, with concurrent changes automatically shown and merged. Madoko also runs on the web and automatically synchronizes changes in the cloud.

Node Atlas

Node Atlas is an agile, flexible geographical Azure database with a web front-end that allows users to curate and explore countless pieces of information indexed by geography, date, time, and any number of metadata items.

Programmability of scalable, geo-distributed, interactive applications

Orleans enables programmers to build scalable, interactive applications that run across hundreds of servers in a datacenter. We show new mechanisms that enable Orleans applications to scale across many datacenters, with improved fault tolerance and latency at no cost to the programmer.

Spatial search optimization

Query from Cortana is often expanded into a complex spatial search reflecting both geographic intent of current location and geo-specific keyword rewrites. See how a cost-based optimization vastly outperforms existing techniques motivates predictive optimization deployed to Bing from our prior work.

Time-travel debugging for JavaScript

Our Time-Travelling Debugger for client-side HTML/JavaScript applications lets developers step forward and backwards through time. It leverages memory management and virtualization features so that developers enjoy a much faster cycle for bug hypothesis generation and investigation, with negligible runtime overhead.

Trill & Tempe: high speed temporal analytics and visualization in real time

We demonstrate how Halo debugged their multiplayer application using two Microsoft Research technologies: Trill, a streaming query processor, and Tempe, a Web-based interactive, real-time dashboarding and analysis tool.

Verifying networks like programs

Network configuration errors frequently cause outages. Our tool, Batfish, detects a broad range of such errors proactively, before the configuration is applied to the network. Learn how Batfish analyzed bugs in two large university networks, finding many misconfigurations.

The design and implementation of a wireless surveillance-based system

In smart cities, cameras will generate copious amount of video data, but their ubiquity limits video that can be sent to the cloud, especially on wireless networks. See how a real-time distributed wireless surveillance system uses edge computing to save wireless capacity.

What can we solve with a quantum computer?

Wondering what quantum computing actually requires and the high-level physics behind it? This demo explains the software architecture and shows how to run small quantum algorithms on your laptop through simulation.

Co-located events

Each year, we hold events in conjunction with the Faculty Summit to provide opportunities for deeper technical engagement. Below, you will see a number of opportunities participants had for further engagement during the 2015 Faculty Summit.

Tuesday, July 7

Microsoft Azure Machine Learning Training and Grants

Chair: Vani Mandava, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Research

Tuesday, July 7, 3:00 – 5:00 P.M. | Hyatt Regency Bellevue Hotel

Join us for a 90-minute Microsoft Azure Machine Learning (Azure ML) all-hands training where you will explore the power of cloud-based predictive analytics. Hear from students who have used Azure ML and how it has helped facilitate collaboration with colleagues without extensive technical training in the academic community. Azure ML will enable you with the following:

  • Capability to visually compose machine learning experiments
  • Access to proven algorithms from Microsoft Research, Bing, and Xbox
  • First-class support for R, enabling you to bring in existing work seamlessly
  • Unmatched ease of collaboration; simply click share my workspace and share experiments with anyone, anywhere
  • Tools to help you immediately deploy a predictive model as a machine-learning web service on the cloud

Take advantage of the Microsoft Azure for Research program and learn how you can receive a free Azure award! We want to hear from researchers and students who are focusing on solving real problems for the benefit of society. Proposals are due August 15, 2015.

Note for participants: please bring a laptop and power cord for your use at this training.

Software Engineering Mix

Chairs: Tom Zimmermann and Andrew Begel, Senior Researchers, Microsoft Research

Tuesday, July 7, 10:00 A.M. – 4:30 P.M. | Hyatt Regency Bellevue Hotel

The Software Engineering Mix provides a forum for our colleagues from academia to interact directly with Microsoft engineers. The program will feature talks from academics: highlights of published research that is highly relevant for Microsoft and blue sky talks summarizing emerging research areas. In addition, practitioners will give presentations about theoretical and pragmatic engineering challenges they face, perhaps soliciting help from academia. A coffee round table setting will be used to facilitate discussions. This session builds on the success of SEIF Days, which provided a discussion forum about the future of software engineering.

Friday, July 10

Advances in Quantum Algorithms and Devices

Chair: Krysta Svore, Senior Researcher, Microsoft Research

Friday, July 10, 8:30 A.M. – 4:30 P.M. | Microsoft Conference Center, Sonora

This workshop aims to answer the question: if we had a quantum computer, what would we do with it? Quantum computers are hypothetical devices that would use the quantum mechanical properties of superposition and entanglement to solve problems that are likely to be forever out of reach of classical computers. There is currently a major worldwide effort to build quantum computers in order to realize these speedups over classical, digital computing. Already we have dramatic and diverse examples of quantum algorithms that outperform the classical counterparts: Shor’s factoring algorithm and its variants break all currently used public-key cryptosystems, and quantum simulations, as initially proposed by Feynman, will have applications throughout chemistry and material science. More recent work suggests that quantum computers may have important applications in machine learning and even in the simulation of classical systems. But quantum algorithms are generally much less well understood than their classical cousins. In particular, we lack a good understanding of which important problems can be solved much faster on quantum computers and which cannot. In this workshop, we will discuss current challenges in building a quantum computer, designing quantum algorithms, and implementing them in hardware.

Big Scholarly Data: Birds of a Feather Session

Chair: Alex Wade, Principal Program Manager, Microsoft Research

Friday, July 10, 9:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. | Microsoft Conference Center, St. Helens

Citation counts and related metrics, such as Journal Impact Factor (JIF) and researcher h-index calculations, attempt to quantify the relative impacts of published works, journals, and authors with mixed success and with often unintended re-applications. Others have run experiments of the citation graph in order to discover emerging areas of research, collaboration and influence networks, ranked lists of researchers and institutions, and funding trends. Several core challenges, such as the tools and methods for analyzing and mining scholarly data will be the main center of discussions at the workshop. The goal of this Birds of a Feature workshop is to foster a community interested in collaborating around this area, including new ranking approaches, recommender systems, social network analysis and other appropriate technologies.

Digital Ink and Touch Driven Research

Chair: Roy Zimmermann, Director, Microsoft Research

Friday, July 10, 9:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. | Microsoft Conference Center, Lassen

Microsoft distributed large, next-generation touch displays to academic researchers to seed early research. The research conducted on these prototype devices included information visualization, human computer interaction, health informatics, visual analytics, science visualization, accessibility and education. This workshop will be an opportunity for the researchers to share their findings with each other, envision the future potential of large touch display devices, as well as with other interested researchers and Microsoft engineers.

HoloLens for Research

Chair: Dan Fay, Senior Director, Microsoft Research

Friday, July 10, 9:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M. | Microsoft Conference Center, Hood

Holograms are the next evolution in computing. While we have just scratched the surface of what is possible, this workshop will discuss potential research around how Holographic computing and, specifically, Microsoft HoloLens. Microsoft HoloLens goes beyond augmented reality and virtual reality by enabling you to interact with three-dimensional holograms blended with your real world. Microsoft HoloLens features see-through, holographic, high-definition lenses and spatial sound so that you can see and hear holograms in the world around you. Complete with advanced sensors and a new Holographic Processing Unit (HPU) that understands the world around you, Microsoft HoloLens is able to run without any wires while processing terabytes of data from the sensors in real-time. Workshop attendees will learn more about how to get started designing and developing for Microsoft HoloLens and explore how to bring their apps to life.

Programmability at Cloud Scale

Chair: Judith Bishop, Director, Microsoft Research

Friday, July 10, 9:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. | Microsoft Conference Center, Rainier

Distributed computing with the cloud in mind is not easy. Having systems that are reliable and fast is taken for granted these days, but the software required to build them is still hard to use. This workshop will start with a deep dive into one of the more successful systems for developing reliable, scalable interactive applications for the cloud: Orleans. Orleans is used by Microsoft as the basis for the Halo game, among other applications, and in January 2015 was released as open source. Thereafter there will be talks and discussion of other similar systems, and of how open source can be utilized to advance and improve the tools we have. The Orleans team as well as Microsoft Research Outreach will be at the workshop to start a community in building high-scale distributed computing applications.

Project Catapult

Chair: Arjmand Samuel, Senior Research Program Manager, Microsoft Research

Friday, July 10, 9:00 A.M. – 3:00 P.M. | Microsoft Conference Center, Baker

Catapult is a Microsoft project investigating the use of field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) to improve performance, reduce power, and provide new capabilities in the datacenter. We have designed an FPGA board that plugs into the Microsoft-designed server that was released publically as the Open CloudServer v1. The Catapult project started as a collaboration between Microsoft Research and Bing. Catapult improved the operations per second of a critical component of Bing’s search engine by nearly a factor of two. Many other applications and services can be accelerated as well. The bottom line for datacenters is more throughput and lower latencies, translating to lower power and cost, higher quality results, or a combination of both. In this workshop the speakers will present design of Catapult and possible applications where the power of Catapult can be harnessed to the fullest.

On demand

Watch the streamed sessions on demand

Wednesday 8 July 2015

Welcome and opening keynote
Watch the opening keynote, “Microsoft’s Unique Role in the Computing Research Ecosystem,” presented by Jeannette Wing, corporate vice president, Microsoft Research.

Panel: Progress in AI: Myths, Realities and Aspirations
Watch the panel, “Progress in AI: Myths, Realities, and Aspirations,” moderated by Eric Horvitz, managing director, Microsoft Research.

Thursday 9 July 2015

A Revolution Against Big-Brother Social Networks
Watch the day 2 opening keynote, “A Revolution Against Big-Brother Social Networks,” presented by Monica Lam, professor of computer science, Stanford University.

A Better Way to Deliver Innovation?
Watch the closing keynote, “A Better Way to Deliver Innovation?”, presented by Peter Lee, corporate vice president, Microsoft Research.

In-person sessions

Posts

Crowd wisdom among many topics examined at top AI event

By George Thomas Jr., Writer, Microsoft Research Researchers have for years sought to understand the way opinions are formed and disseminated throughout social settings. Is there such a thing as the wisdom of the crowd? New research presented at…

July 2015

Microsoft Research Blog

The 2015 Microsoft Research Faculty Summit breaks records

Walking into the Microsoft Conference Center this morning, I could feel the excitement in the air as 600 academics and researchers started meeting up for the Microsoft Research Faculty Summit in Redmond, Washington. High on the agenda of this, our…

July 2015

Microsoft Research Blog